Alternatives to Mongoose logo

Alternatives to Mongoose

MongoDB, Anaconda, Python, and Mongoid are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Mongoose.
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What is Mongoose and what are its top alternatives?

Let's face it, writing MongoDB validation, casting and business logic boilerplate is a drag. That's why we wrote Mongoose. Mongoose provides a straight-forward, schema-based solution to modeling your application data and includes built-in type casting, validation, query building, business logic hooks and more, out of the box.
Mongoose is a tool in the Object Document Mapper (ODM) category of a tech stack.
Mongoose is an open source tool with 19.9K GitHub stars and 2.7K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Mongoose's open source repository on GitHub

Mongoose alternatives & related posts

MongoDB logo

MongoDB

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The database for giant ideas
MongoDB logo
MongoDB
VS
Mongoose logo
Mongoose

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Jeyabalaji Subramanian
Jeyabalaji Subramanian
CTO at FundsCorner · | 24 upvotes · 346.7K views
atFundsCornerFundsCorner
MongoDB
MongoDB
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
MongoDB Stitch
MongoDB Stitch
Node.js
Node.js
Amazon SQS
Amazon SQS
Python
Python
SQLAlchemy
SQLAlchemy
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Zappa
Zappa

Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

See more
Robert Zuber
Robert Zuber
CTO at CircleCI · | 22 upvotes · 217.1K views
atCircleCICircleCI
MongoDB
MongoDB
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Redis
Redis
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon S3
Amazon S3

We use MongoDB as our primary #datastore. Mongo's approach to replica sets enables some fantastic patterns for operations like maintenance, backups, and #ETL.

As we pull #microservices from our #monolith, we are taking the opportunity to build them with their own datastores using PostgreSQL. We also use Redis to cache data we’d never store permanently, and to rate-limit our requests to partners’ APIs (like GitHub).

When we’re dealing with large blobs of immutable data (logs, artifacts, and test results), we store them in Amazon S3. We handle any side-effects of S3’s eventual consistency model within our own code. This ensures that we deal with user requests correctly while writes are in process.

See more
Anaconda logo

Anaconda

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The Enterprise Data Science Platform for Data Scientists, IT Professionals and Business Leaders
    Be the first to leave a pro
    Anaconda logo
    Anaconda
    VS
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    Mongoose

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    Guillaume Simler
    Guillaume Simler
    at Velchanos.io · | 4 upvotes · 19.3K views
    Jupyter
    Jupyter
    Anaconda
    Anaconda
    Pandas
    Pandas
    IPython
    IPython

    Jupyter Anaconda Pandas IPython

    A great way to prototype your data analytic modules. The use of the package is simple and user-friendly and the migration from ipython to python is fairly simple: a lot of cleaning, but no more.

    The negative aspect comes when you want to streamline your productive system or does CI with your anaconda environment: - most tools don't accept conda environments (as smoothly as pip requirements) - the conda environments (even with miniconda) have quite an overhead

    See more
    Python logo

    Python

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    A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java.
    Python logo
    Python
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    Mongoose logo
    Mongoose

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    Nick Parsons
    Nick Parsons
    Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 33 upvotes · 270.3K views
    atStreamStream
    Stream
    Stream
    Go
    Go
    JavaScript
    JavaScript
    ES6
    ES6
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Babel
    Babel
    Yarn
    Yarn
    Python
    Python
    #FrameworksFullStack
    #Languages

    Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

    We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

    We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

    Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

    #FrameworksFullStack #Languages

    See more
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    Jeyabalaji Subramanian
    CTO at FundsCorner · | 24 upvotes · 346.7K views
    atFundsCornerFundsCorner
    MongoDB
    MongoDB
    PostgreSQL
    PostgreSQL
    MongoDB Stitch
    MongoDB Stitch
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Amazon SQS
    Amazon SQS
    Python
    Python
    SQLAlchemy
    SQLAlchemy
    AWS Lambda
    AWS Lambda
    Zappa
    Zappa

    Recently we were looking at a few robust and cost-effective ways of replicating the data that resides in our production MongoDB to a PostgreSQL database for data warehousing and business intelligence.

    We set ourselves the following criteria for the optimal tool that would do this job: - The data replication must be near real-time, yet it should NOT impact the production database - The data replication must be horizontally scalable (based on the load), asynchronous & crash-resilient

    Based on the above criteria, we selected the following tools to perform the end to end data replication:

    We chose MongoDB Stitch for picking up the changes in the source database. It is the serverless platform from MongoDB. One of the services offered by MongoDB Stitch is Stitch Triggers. Using stitch triggers, you can execute a serverless function (in Node.js) in real time in response to changes in the database. When there are a lot of database changes, Stitch automatically "feeds forward" these changes through an asynchronous queue.

    We chose Amazon SQS as the pipe / message backbone for communicating the changes from MongoDB to our own replication service. Interestingly enough, MongoDB stitch offers integration with AWS services.

    In the Node.js function, we wrote minimal functionality to communicate the database changes (insert / update / delete / replace) to Amazon SQS.

    Next we wrote a minimal micro-service in Python to listen to the message events on SQS, pickup the data payload & mirror the DB changes on to the target Data warehouse. We implemented source data to target data translation by modelling target table structures through SQLAlchemy . We deployed this micro-service as AWS Lambda with Zappa. With Zappa, deploying your services as event-driven & horizontally scalable Lambda service is dumb-easy.

    In the end, we got to implement a highly scalable near realtime Change Data Replication service that "works" and deployed to production in a matter of few days!

    See more
    Mongoid logo

    Mongoid

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    Ruby ODM framework for MongoDB
    Mongoid logo
    Mongoid
    VS
    Mongoose logo
    Mongoose