Alternatives to pip logo

Alternatives to pip

npm, Homebrew, Yarn, RequireJS, and Bower are the most popular alternatives and competitors to pip.
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What is pip and what are its top alternatives?

It is the package installer for Python. You can use pip to install packages from the Python Package Index and other indexes.
pip is a tool in the Front End Package Manager category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to pip

  • npm

    npm

    npm is the command-line interface to the npm ecosystem. It is battle-tested, surprisingly flexible, and used by hundreds of thousands of JavaScript developers every day. ...

  • Homebrew

    Homebrew

    Homebrew installs the stuff you need that Apple didn鈥檛. Homebrew installs packages to their own directory and then symlinks their files into /usr/local. ...

  • Yarn

    Yarn

    Yarn caches every package it downloads so it never needs to again. It also parallelizes operations to maximize resource utilization so install times are faster than ever. ...

  • RequireJS

    RequireJS

    RequireJS loads plain JavaScript files as well as more defined modules. It is optimized for in-browser use, including in a Web Worker, but it can be used in other JavaScript environments, like Rhino and Node. It implements the Asynchronous Module API. Using a modular script loader like RequireJS will improve the speed and quality of your code. ...

  • Bower

    Bower

    Bower is a package manager for the web. It offers a generic, unopinionated solution to the problem of front-end package management, while exposing the package dependency model via an API that can be consumed by a more opinionated build stack. There are no system wide dependencies, no dependencies are shared between different apps, and the dependency tree is flat. ...

  • Browserify

    Browserify

    Browserify lets you require('modules') in the browser by bundling up all of your dependencies. ...

  • Component

    Component

    Component's philosophy is the UNIX philosophy of the web - to create a platform for small, reusable components that consist of JS, CSS, HTML, images, fonts, etc. With its well-defined specs, using Component means not worrying about most frontend problems such as package management, publishing components to a registry, or creating a custom build process for every single app. ...

  • Bundler

    Bundler

    It provides a consistent environment for Ruby projects by tracking and installing the exact gems and versions that are needed. It is an exit from dependency hell, and ensures that the gems you need are present in development, staging, and production. ...

pip alternatives & related posts

npm logo

npm

61K
46.3K
1.6K
The package manager for JavaScript.
61K
46.3K
+ 1
1.6K
PROS OF NPM
  • 649
    Best package management system for javascript
  • 382
    Open-source
  • 327
    Great community
  • 147
    More packages than rubygems, pypi, or packagist
  • 112
    Nice people matter
  • 5
    Audit feature
  • 4
    Good following
  • 4
    As fast as yarn but really free of facebook
  • 1
    Stability
  • 1
    Super fast
CONS OF NPM
  • 5
    Problems with lockfiles
  • 5
    Bad at package versioning and being deterministic
  • 3
    Node-gyp takes forever
  • 1
    Super slow

related npm posts

Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH | 24 upvotes 路 1.7M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API鈥檚 resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
See more
Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps | 19 upvotes 路 1.2M views

So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

See more
Homebrew logo

Homebrew

406
346
1
The Missing Package Manager for macOS
406
346
+ 1
1
PROS OF HOMEBREW
  • 1
    Clean, neat, powerful, fast and furious
CONS OF HOMEBREW
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Homebrew posts

    Yarn logo

    Yarn

    11.3K
    7.7K
    141
    A new package manager for JavaScript
    11.3K
    7.7K
    + 1
    141
    PROS OF YARN
    • 84
      Incredibly fast
    • 21
      Easy to use
    • 12
      Open Source
    • 10
      Can install any npm package
    • 7
      Works where npm fails
    • 5
      Workspaces
    • 2
      Incomplete to run tasks
    CONS OF YARN
    • 15
      Facebook
    • 6
      Sends data to facebook
    • 3
      Should be installed separately
    • 2
      Cannot publish to registry other than npm

    related Yarn posts

    Simon Reymann
    Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH | 24 upvotes 路 1.7M views

    Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

    • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
    • npm as package manager
    • NestJS as Node.js framework
    • TypeScript as programming language
    • ExpressJS as web server
    • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API鈥檚 resources
    • Postman as a tool for API development
    • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
    • JSON Web Token for access token management

    The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

    • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
    • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
    • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
    • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
    See more
    Johnny Bell
    Software Engineer at Weedmaps | 19 upvotes 路 1.2M views

    So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

    So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

    The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

    I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

    Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

    I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

    See more
    RequireJS logo

    RequireJS

    6.9K
    2K
    307
    JavaScript file and module loader
    6.9K
    2K
    + 1
    307
    PROS OF REQUIREJS
    • 79
      Open source
    • 69
      Modular script loader
    • 66
      Asynchronous
    • 49
      Great for AMD
    • 30
      Fast
    • 14
      Free
    CONS OF REQUIREJS
      Be the first to leave a con

      related RequireJS posts

      Bower logo

      Bower

      5.2K
      3.6K
      927
      A package manager for the web
      5.2K
      3.6K
      + 1
      927
      PROS OF BOWER
      • 483
        Package management
      • 214
        Open source
      • 142
        Simple
      • 53
        Great for for project dependencies injection
      • 27
        Web components with Meteor
      • 8
        Portable dependencies Management
      CONS OF BOWER
      • 2
        Deprecated
      • 1
        Front end only

      related Bower posts

      Browserify logo

      Browserify

      579
      387
      262
      Browser-side require() the node.js way
      579
      387
      + 1
      262
      PROS OF BROWSERIFY
      • 75
        Node style browser code
      • 52
        Load modules installed by npm
      • 45
        Works great with gulp.js
      • 38
        NPM modules in the brower
      • 35
        Open source
      • 16
        Node streams
      • 1
        Easy setup
      CONS OF BROWSERIFY
        Be the first to leave a con

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        Yunus 脰ZCAN

        Appitr Run JavaScript ES6 with React Native in the browser built on Monaco Editor, Browserify Webpack Sequelize npm Node.js ExpressJS Babel Flow Type ESLint MobX GraphQL

        See more
        Component logo

        Component

        150
        91
        20
        Client package management for building better web applications
        150
        91
        + 1
        20
        PROS OF COMPONENT
        • 20
          Open source
        CONS OF COMPONENT
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          Bundler logo

          Bundler

          108
          45
          0
          A consistent environment for tracking and installing gems and versions
          108
          45
          + 1
          0
          PROS OF BUNDLER
            Be the first to leave a pro
            CONS OF BUNDLER
              Be the first to leave a con

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