Alternatives to GitHub Pages logo

Alternatives to GitHub Pages

Netlify, GitLab Pages, Amazon S3, Medium, and WordPress are the most popular alternatives and competitors to GitHub Pages.
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What is GitHub Pages and what are its top alternatives?

Public webpages hosted directly from your GitHub repository. Just edit, push, and your changes are live.
GitHub Pages is a tool in the Static Web Hosting category of a tech stack.

GitHub Pages alternatives & related posts

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Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare | 58 upvotes 567.2K views
Firebase
Firebase
React
React
Redux
Redux
styled-components
styled-components
Netlify
Netlify
Gatsby
Gatsby
GitHub
GitHub
#ReactRally
#Frontend
#Google

I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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Osamah Aldoaiss
Osamah Aldoaiss
UI Engineer | Maker at Triad Apparel Inc. | 12 upvotes 23.2K views
atTriad Apparel Inc.Triad Apparel Inc.
Netlify
Netlify
GitHub
GitHub

I use Netlify for all of my projects for the ease of setup and the huge Developer Experience they offer. From Netlify CLI, to the newly announced Netlify Analytics, we have no issues with Netlify and scaling is possible to a certain degree. We connect Netlify with our GitHub Repos and let all branches build to get a Preview. Also we connected our Domain with ease to it and were able to have the page be shown on our domain.

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GitLab Pages logo

GitLab Pages

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Create websites for your GitLab projects, groups, or user account
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GitLab Pages
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GitHub Pages

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Michael Kelly
Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare | 14 upvotes 353.9K views
atACK FoundryACK Foundry
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
GitLab Pages
GitLab Pages
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
#OpenSourceCloud

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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Joshua Dean K眉pper
Joshua Dean K眉pper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt) | 10 upvotes 95.3K views
atScrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschr盲nkt)
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
GitLab
GitLab
GitLab Pages
GitLab Pages
Jenkins
Jenkins

We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

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Amazon S3 logo

Amazon S3

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Store and retrieve any amount of data, at any time, from anywhere on the web
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Ashish Singh
Ashish Singh
Tech Lead, Big Data Platform at Pinterest | 28 upvotes 243.3K views
Apache Hive
Apache Hive
Presto
Presto
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Kafka
Kafka
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
#DataScience
#DataEngineering
#AWS
#BigData

To provide employees with the critical need of interactive querying, we鈥檝e worked with Presto, an open-source distributed SQL query engine, over the years. Operating Presto at Pinterest鈥檚 scale has involved resolving quite a few challenges like, supporting deeply nested and huge thrift schemas, slow/ bad worker detection and remediation, auto-scaling cluster, graceful cluster shutdown and impersonation support for ldap authenticator.

Our infrastructure is built on top of Amazon EC2 and we leverage Amazon S3 for storing our data. This separates compute and storage layers, and allows multiple compute clusters to share the S3 data.

We have hundreds of petabytes of data and tens of thousands of Apache Hive tables. Our Presto clusters are comprised of a fleet of 450 r4.8xl EC2 instances. Presto clusters together have over 100 TBs of memory and 14K vcpu cores. Within Pinterest, we have close to more than 1,000 monthly active users (out of total 1,600+ Pinterest employees) using Presto, who run about 400K queries on these clusters per month.

Each query submitted to Presto cluster is logged to a Kafka topic via Singer. Singer is a logging agent built at Pinterest and we talked about it in a previous post. Each query is logged when it is submitted and when it finishes. When a Presto cluster crashes, we will have query submitted events without corresponding query finished events. These events enable us to capture the effect of cluster crashes over time.

Each Presto cluster at Pinterest has workers on a mix of dedicated AWS EC2 instances and Kubernetes pods. Kubernetes platform provides us with the capability to add and remove workers from a Presto cluster very quickly. The best-case latency on bringing up a new worker on Kubernetes is less than a minute. However, when the Kubernetes cluster itself is out of resources and needs to scale up, it can take up to ten minutes. Some other advantages of deploying on Kubernetes platform is that our Presto deployment becomes agnostic of cloud vendor, instance types, OS, etc.

#BigData #AWS #DataScience #DataEngineering

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John-Daniel Trask
John-Daniel Trask
Co-founder & CEO at Raygun | 19 upvotes 172.8K views
atRaygunRaygun
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
nginx
nginx
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
#CloudHosting
#WebServers
#CloudStorage
#LoadBalancerReverseProxy

We chose AWS because, at the time, it was really the only cloud provider to choose from.

We tend to use their basic building blocks (EC2, ELB, Amazon S3, Amazon RDS) rather than vendor specific components like databases and queuing. We deliberately decided to do this to ensure we could provide multi-cloud support or potentially move to another cloud provider if the offering was better for our customers.

We鈥檝e utilized c3.large nodes for both the Node.js deployment and then for the .NET Core deployment. Both sit as backends behind an nginx instance and are managed using scaling groups in Amazon EC2 sitting behind a standard AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB).

While we鈥檙e satisfied with AWS, we do review our decision each year and have looked at Azure and Google Cloud offerings.

#CloudHosting #WebServers #CloudStorage #LoadBalancerReverseProxy

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Dale Ross
Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed | 21 upvotes 181.9K views
Blogger
Blogger
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
WordPress
WordPress
Jekyll
Jekyll
GitHub Pages
GitHub Pages
Ruby
Ruby
Disqus
Disqus

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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Siddhant Sharma
Siddhant Sharma
Tech Connoisseur at Bigstep Technologies | 12 upvotes 153.8K views
WordPress
WordPress
Magento
Magento
PHP
PHP
Java
Java
Swift
Swift
JavaScript
JavaScript
#Messaging
#Communication
#InAppChat
#Dating
#Matrimonial

WordPress Magento PHP Java Swift JavaScript

Back in the days, we started looking for a date on different matrimonial websites as there were no Dating Applications. We used to create different profiles. It all changed in 2012 when Tinder, an Online Dating application came into India Market.

Tinder allowed us to communicate with our potential soul mates. That too without paying any extra money. I too got 4-6 matches in 6 years. It changed the life of many Millennials. Tinder created a revolution of its own. P.S. - I still don't have a date :(

Posting my first article. Please have a look and do give feedback.

Communication InAppChat Dating Matrimonial #messaging

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Heroku logo

Heroku

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Build, deliver, monitor and scale web apps and APIs with a trail blazing developer experience.
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Russel Werner
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare | 27 upvotes 762.4K views
atStackShareStackShare
React
React
Glamorous
Glamorous
Apollo
Apollo
Node.js
Node.js
Rails
Rails
Heroku
Heroku
GitHub
GitHub
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Webpack
Webpack
CircleCI
CircleCI
Redis
Redis
#StackDecisionsLaunch
#SSR
#Microservices
#FrontEndRepoSplit

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

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Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly | 20 upvotes 1.2M views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
Heroku
Heroku
Docker
Docker
GitHub
GitHub
Node.js
Node.js
hapi
hapi
Vue.js
Vue.js
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Knex.js
Knex.js
vuex
vuex

Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

  • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
  • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
  • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
  • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
  • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

  1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
  2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
  3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
  4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

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Firebase logo

Firebase

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The Realtime App Platform
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Tassanai Singprom
Tassanai Singprom
JavaScript
JavaScript
PHP
PHP
HTML5
HTML5
jQuery
jQuery
Redis
Redis
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Sass
Sass
Vue.js
Vue.js
Firebase
Firebase
Laravel
Laravel
Lumen
Lumen
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
GraphQL
GraphQL
MariaDB
MariaDB
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
Postman
Postman
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab
npm
npm
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kibana
Kibana
Sentry
Sentry
BrowserStack
BrowserStack
Slack
Slack

This is my stack in Application & Data

JavaScript PHP HTML5 jQuery Redis Amazon EC2 Ubuntu Sass Vue.js Firebase Laravel Lumen Amazon RDS GraphQL MariaDB

My Utilities Tools

Google Analytics Postman Elasticsearch

My Devops Tools

Git GitHub GitLab npm Visual Studio Code Kibana Sentry BrowserStack

My Business Tools

Slack

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fontumi
fontumi
Firebase
Firebase
Node.js
Node.js
FeathersJS
FeathersJS
Vue.js
Vue.js
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Dialogflow
Dialogflow
Cloud Firestore
Cloud Firestore
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

Fontumi focuses on the development of telecommunications solutions. We have opted for technologies that allow agile development and great scalability.

Firebase and Node.js + FeathersJS are technologies that we have used on the server side. Vue.js is our main framework for clients.

Our latest products launched have been focused on the integration of AI systems for enriched conversations. Google Compute Engine , along with Dialogflow and Cloud Firestore have been important tools for this work.

Git + GitHub + Visual Studio Code is a killer stack.

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Firebase Hosting

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