Alternatives to Magit logo

Alternatives to Magit

Git, SVN (Subversion), Mercurial, Plastic SCM, and Pijul are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Magit.
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What is Magit and what are its top alternatives?

It is an interface to the version control system Git, implemented as an Emacs package. It aspires to be a complete Git porcelain. While we cannot (yet) claim that it wraps and improves upon each and every Git command, it is complete enough to allow even experienced Git users to perform almost all of their daily version control tasks directly from within Emacs. While many fine Git clients exist, only deserve to be called porcelains.
Magit is a tool in the Version Control System category of a tech stack.
Magit is an open source tool with 4.2K GitHub stars and 607 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Magit's open source repository on GitHub

Magit alternatives & related posts

Git logo

Git

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Fast, scalable, distributed revision control system
Git logo
Git
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Magit

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Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 16 upvotes · 44.5K views
npm
npm
Babel
Babel
PHP
PHP
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
Asana
Asana
ES6
ES6
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git
JSON
JSON
Sass
Sass
Pug
Pug
JavaScript
JavaScript
vuex
vuex
Vue.js
Vue.js

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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Epistol
Epistol
PHP
PHP
Bulma
Bulma
Asana
Asana
Stripe
Stripe
Let's Encrypt
Let's Encrypt
CloudFlare
CloudFlare
Deployer
Deployer
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
nginx
nginx
Buddy
Buddy
Webpack
Webpack
Vue.js
Vue.js
JavaScript
JavaScript
HTML5
HTML5
Sass
Sass
Google Analytics
Google Analytics
PhpStorm
PhpStorm
Laravel
Laravel
#CDG
CDG

I use Laravel because it's the most advances PHP framework out there, easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and most of all : easy to get a handle on, and to follow every new technology ! PhpStorm is our main software to code, as of simplicity and full range of tools for a modern application.

Google Analytics Analytics of course for a tailored analytics, Bulma as an innovative CSS framework, coupled with our Sass (Scss) pre-processor.

As of more basic stuff, we use HTML5, JavaScript (but with Vue.js too) and Webpack to handle the generation of all this.

To deploy, we set up Buddy to easily send the updates on our nginx / Ubuntu server, where it will connect to our GitHub Git private repository, pull and do all the operations needed with Deployer .

CloudFlare ensure the rapidity of distribution of our content, and Let's Encrypt the https certificate that is more than necessary when we'll want to sell some products with our Stripe api calls.

Asana is here to let us list all the functionalities, possibilities and ideas we want to implement.

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SVN (Subversion) logo

SVN (Subversion)

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Enterprise-class centralized version control for the masses
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SVN (Subversion)
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Magit

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SVN (Subversion)
SVN (Subversion)
Git
Git
JSON
JSON
XML
XML
Python
Python
PHP
PHP
Java
Java
Swift
Swift
JavaScript
JavaScript
Linux
Linux
GitHub
GitHub
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code

I use Visual Studio Code because at this time is a mature software and I can do practically everything using it.

  • It's free and open source: The project is hosted on GitHub and it’s free to download, fork, modify and contribute to the project.

  • Multi-platform: You can download binaries for different platforms, included Windows (x64), MacOS and Linux (.rpm and .deb packages)

  • LightWeight: It runs smoothly in different devices. It has an average memory and CPU usage. Starts almost immediately and it’s very stable.

  • Extended language support: Supports by default the majority of the most used languages and syntax like JavaScript, HTML, C#, Swift, Java, PHP, Python and others. Also, VS Code supports different file types associated to projects like .ini, .properties, XML and JSON files.

  • Integrated tools: Includes an integrated terminal, debugger, problem list and console output inspector. The project navigator sidebar is simple and powerful: you can manage your files and folders with ease. The command palette helps you find commands by text. The search widget has a powerful auto-complete feature to search and find your files.

  • Extensible and configurable: There are many extensions available for every language supported, including syntax highlighters, IntelliSense and code completion, and debuggers. There are also extension to manage application configuration and architecture like Docker and Jenkins.

  • Integrated with Git: You can visually manage your project repositories, pull, commit and push your changes, and easy conflict resolution.( there is support for SVN (Subversion) users by plugin)

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rishig
rishig
Head of Product at Zulip · | 4 upvotes · 15.1K views
atZulipZulip
SVN (Subversion)
SVN (Subversion)
Git
Git

I use Git instead of SVN (Subversion) because it allows us to scale our development team. At any given time, the Zulip open source project has hundreds of open pull requests from tens of contributors, each in various stages of the pipeline. Git's workflow makes it very easy to context switch between different feature branches.

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related Mercurial posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 6 upvotes · 15.3K views
atZulipZulip
Mercurial
Mercurial
Git
Git

I've been excited about Git ever since it got a built-in UI. It's the perfect combination of a really solid, simple data model, which allows an experienced user to predict precisely what a Git subcommand will do, often without needing to read the documentation (see the slides linked from the attached article for details). Most important to me as the lead developer of a large open source project (Zulip) is that it makes it possible to build a really clean, clear development history that I regularly use to understand details of our code history that are critical to making correct changes.

And it performs really, really well. In 2014, I managed Dropbox's migration from Mercurial to Git. And just switching tools made just about every common operation (git status, git log, git commit etc.) 2-10x faster than with Mercurial. It makes sense if you think about it, since Git was designed to perform well with Linux, one of the largest open source projects out there, but it was still a huge productivity increase that we got basically for free.

If you're learning Git, I highly recommend reading the other sections of Zulip's Git Guide; we get a lot of positive feedback from developers on it being a useful resource even for their projects unrelated to Zulip.

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Plastic SCM logo

Plastic SCM

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A distributed version control with strong merging, great GUIs and support for huge files
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Plastic SCM
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Magit
Pijul logo

Pijul

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A free and open source distributed version control system
Pijul logo
Pijul
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Magit
Git Reflow logo

Git Reflow

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Reflow automatically creates pull requests, ensures the code review is approved, and squash merges finished branches to master
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    Git Reflow logo
    Git Reflow
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    Magit logo
    Magit
    Gitless logo

    Gitless

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    An experimental version control system built on top of Git
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      Gitless
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      Magit logo
      Magit
      BitKeeper logo

      BitKeeper

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      Enterprise-ready version control, now open-source
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        Magit