Alternatives to Spring MVC logo

Alternatives to Spring MVC

Spring Boot, Rails, Spring Framework, JSF, and Vaadin are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Spring MVC.
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What is Spring MVC and what are its top alternatives?

A Java framework that follows the Model-View-Controller design pattern and provides an elegant solution to use MVC in spring framework by the help of DispatcherServlet.
Spring MVC is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
Spring MVC is an open source tool with 45.7K GitHub stars and 32.3K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Spring MVC's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Spring MVC

  • Spring Boot

    Spring Boot

    Spring Boot makes it easy to create stand-alone, production-grade Spring based Applications that you can "just run". We take an opinionated view of the Spring platform and third-party libraries so you can get started with minimum fuss. Most Spring Boot applications need very little Spring configuration. ...

  • Rails

    Rails

    Rails is a web-application framework that includes everything needed to create database-backed web applications according to the Model-View-Controller (MVC) pattern. ...

  • Spring Framework

    Spring Framework

    It provides a comprehensive programming and configuration model for modern Java-based enterprise applications - on any kind of deployment platform. The framework's core features can be used by any Java application, but there are extensions for building web applications on top of the Java EE platform. ...

  • JSF

    JSF

    It is used for building component-based user interfaces for web applications and was formalized as a standard through the Java Community ...

  • Vaadin

    Vaadin

    It is the fastest way to build web applications in Java. It automates the communication between your server and the browser and gives you a high-level component API for all Vaadin components ...

  • React

    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • Jersey

    Jersey

    It is open source, production quality, framework for developing RESTful Web Services in Java that provides support for JAX-RS APIs and serves as a JAX-RS (JSR 311 & JSR 339) Reference Implementation. It provides it’s own API that extend the JAX-RS toolkit with additional features and utilities to further simplify RESTful service and client development. ...

  • Spring

    Spring

    A key element of Spring is infrastructural support at the application level: Spring focuses on the "plumbing" of enterprise applications so that teams can focus on application-level business logic, without unnecessary ties to specific deployment environments. ...

Spring MVC alternatives & related posts

Spring Boot logo

Spring Boot

17.6K
15.6K
913
Create Spring-powered, production-grade applications and services with absolute minimum fuss
17.6K
15.6K
+ 1
913
PROS OF SPRING BOOT
  • 134
    Powerful and handy
  • 127
    Easy setup
  • 118
    Java
  • 86
    Spring
  • 82
    Fast
  • 42
    Extensible
  • 34
    Lots of "off the shelf" functionalities
  • 29
    Cloud Solid
  • 23
    Caches well
  • 21
    Many receipes around for obscure features
  • 20
    Productive
  • 20
    Modular
  • 19
    Spring ecosystem is great
  • 19
    Integrations with most other Java frameworks
  • 18
    Fast Performance With Microservices
  • 17
    Auto-configuration
  • 16
    Community
  • 13
    One-stop shop
  • 13
    Easy setup, Community Support, Solid for ERP apps
  • 12
    Cross-platform
  • 12
    Easy to parallelize
  • 11
    Easy setup, good for build erp systems, well documented
  • 11
    Powerful 3rd party libraries and frameworks
  • 10
    Easy setup, Git Integration
  • 3
    Kotlin
  • 3
    It's so easier to start a project on spring
CONS OF SPRING BOOT
  • 20
    Heavy weight
  • 17
    Annotation ceremony
  • 10
    Many config files needed
  • 8
    Java
  • 5
    Reactive
  • 4
    Excellent tools for cloud hosting, since 5.x

related Spring Boot posts

Is learning Spring and Spring Boot for web apps back-end development is still relevant in 2021? Feel free to share your views with comparison to Django/Node.js/ ExpressJS or other frameworks.

Please share some good beginner resources to start learning about spring/spring boot framework to build the web apps.

See more
Praveen Mooli
Engineering Manager at Taylor and Francis · | 14 upvotes · 2.1M views

We are in the process of building a modern content platform to deliver our content through various channels. We decided to go with Microservices architecture as we wanted scale. Microservice architecture style is an approach to developing an application as a suite of small independently deployable services built around specific business capabilities. You can gain modularity, extensive parallelism and cost-effective scaling by deploying services across many distributed servers. Microservices modularity facilitates independent updates/deployments, and helps to avoid single point of failure, which can help prevent large-scale outages. We also decided to use Event Driven Architecture pattern which is a popular distributed asynchronous architecture pattern used to produce highly scalable applications. The event-driven architecture is made up of highly decoupled, single-purpose event processing components that asynchronously receive and process events.

To build our #Backend capabilities we decided to use the following: 1. #Microservices - Java with Spring Boot , Node.js with ExpressJS and Python with Flask 2. #Eventsourcingframework - Amazon Kinesis , Amazon Kinesis Firehose , Amazon SNS , Amazon SQS, AWS Lambda 3. #Data - Amazon RDS , Amazon DynamoDB , Amazon S3 , MongoDB Atlas

To build #Webapps we decided to use Angular 2 with RxJS

#Devops - GitHub , Travis CI , Terraform , Docker , Serverless

See more
Rails logo

Rails

15.6K
10.9K
5.4K
Web development that doesn't hurt
15.6K
10.9K
+ 1
5.4K
PROS OF RAILS
  • 850
    Rapid development
  • 650
    Great gems
  • 605
    Great community
  • 481
    Convention over configuration
  • 417
    Mvc
  • 349
    Great for web
  • 344
    Beautiful code
  • 311
    Open source
  • 270
    Great libraries
  • 260
    Active record
  • 106
    Elegant
  • 89
    Easy to learn
  • 87
    Easy Database Migrations
  • 79
    Makes you happy
  • 74
    Free
  • 62
    Great routing
  • 53
    Has everything you need to get the job done
  • 41
    Great Data Modeling
  • 38
    MVC - Easy to start on
  • 38
    Beautiful
  • 35
    Easy setup
  • 26
    Great caching
  • 25
    Ultra rapid development time
  • 22
    It's super easy
  • 17
    Great Resources
  • 16
    Easy to build mockups that work
  • 14
    Less Boilerplate
  • 7
    API Development
  • 7
    Developer Friendly
  • 6
    Great documentation
  • 5
    Quick
  • 5
    Easy REST API creation
  • 4
    Intuitive
  • 4
    Great language
  • 4
    Haml and sass
  • 4
    Easy to learn, use, improvise and update
  • 2
    It works
  • 2
    Jet packs come standard
  • 2
    Easy and fast
  • 2
    Legacy
  • 2
    Metaprogramming
  • 1
    Convention over configuration
  • 1
    Easy Testing
  • 1
    Cancan
  • 1
    It's intuitive
CONS OF RAILS
  • 22
    Too much "magic" (hidden behavior)
  • 13
    Poor raw performance
  • 11
    Asset system is too primitive and outdated
  • 6
    Heavy use of mixins
  • 6
    Bloat in models
  • 3
    Very Very slow

related Rails posts

Zach Holman

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

See more
Russel Werner
Lead Engineer at StackShare · | 30 upvotes · 1.5M views

StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

#StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

See more
Spring Framework logo

Spring Framework

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An application framework and inversion of control container for the Java platform
789
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PROS OF SPRING FRAMEWORK
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF SPRING FRAMEWORK
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Spring Framework posts

      I would like to generate all the repetitive code in order to bootstrap my Java project. I need to define my own models. I want to be able to customize everything in what will be generated. JHipster is more popular but seems to be really related to the Spring Framework. Telosys supports multi-languages, multi-frameworks, and is highly customizable. Any feedback about these 2 tools?

      See more
      JSF logo

      JSF

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      167
      4
      It is used for building component-based web interfaces
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      167
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      PROS OF JSF
      • 2
        Rich and comprehensive Request Life-cycle
      • 1
        Very Mature UI framework
      • 1
        Server Side component
      CONS OF JSF
        Be the first to leave a con

        related JSF posts

        Hello guys! I would ask for your advice. Our situation is like that there will be a project to revamp workflows and introduce new services like mobile apps, machine learning, and some online services that would use cloud storage. We use JSF, JavaScript, Ajax, Spring, Oracle 12c running on Linux (VM) and providing online services to internal users and the public. But, we are not technically savvy enough to evaluate what tools should be introduced. Personally, I am evaluating whether to take this opportunity to change our practice/PM approach from Prince to Scrum/Agile (It seemed that DevOps is popular) ... Since we adopt ISO 27001 and ISO 20000, security is a crucial factor that we consider. Would you please help to recommend a list of tools and explain the reasons why you recommend them? Thanks in advance~!

        See more

        I need to modernize a Java web application that runs on JSF. I am used to building websites, so Bootstrap kinda feels like "home." But when it comes to applications, I feel Bootstrap is not the right way to go. Can someone explain to me what PrimeFaces is capable of in comparison with BS?

        See more
        Vaadin logo

        Vaadin

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        Components and tools for building web apps in Java
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        PROS OF VAADIN
        • 8
          Java
        • 6
          Open Source
        • 6
          Compatibility
        • 5
          Components
        • 3
          Performance
        • 2
          Abstraction
        • 2
          Example packages
        • 1
          OSGI Support
        CONS OF VAADIN
        • 3
          Paid for more features

        related Vaadin posts

        React logo

        React

        115.8K
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        A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
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        PROS OF REACT
        • 762
          Components
        • 651
          Virtual dom
        • 563
          Performance
        • 488
          Simplicity
        • 436
          Composable
        • 175
          Data flow
        • 160
          Declarative
        • 124
          Isn't an mvc framework
        • 113
          Reactive updates
        • 111
          Explicit app state
        • 34
          JSX
        • 23
          Learn once, write everywhere
        • 19
          Uni-directional data flow
        • 16
          Easy to Use
        • 14
          Works great with Flux Architecture
        • 10
          Great perfomance
        • 8
          Built by Facebook
        • 7
          Javascript
        • 5
          Speed
        • 5
          TypeScript support
        • 4
          Easy to start
        • 4
          Hooks
        • 4
          Awesome
        • 4
          Feels like the 90s
        • 4
          Scalable
        • 3
          Props
        • 3
          Server side views
        • 3
          Functional
        • 3
          Fancy third party tools
        • 2
          Obama
        • 2
          Has arrow functions
        • 2
          Strong Community
        • 2
          Beautiful and Neat Component Management
        • 2
          Sdfsdfsdf
        • 2
          Great migration pathway for older systems
        • 2
          SSR
        • 2
          Fast evolving
        • 2
          Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
        • 2
          Allows creating single page applications
        • 2
          Excellent Documentation
        • 2
          Rich ecosystem
        • 2
          Scales super well
        • 2
          Just the View of MVC
        • 2
          Simple
        • 2
          Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
        • 2
          Super easy
        • 2
          Very gentle learning curve
        • 2
          Server Side Rendering
        • 2
          Cross-platform
        • 2
          Has functional components
        • 1
          Start simple
        • 1
          Every decision architecture wise makes sense
        • 1
          Permissively-licensed
        • 1
          Split your UI into components with one true state
        • 1
          Sharable
        • 1
          Fragments
        CONS OF REACT
        • 35
          Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
        • 23
          No predefined way to structure your app
        • 21
          Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
        • 8
          JSX
        • 7
          Not enterprise friendly
        • 4
          One-way binding only
        • 2
          State consistency with backend neglected
        • 2
          Bad Documentation

        related React posts

        Vaibhav Taunk
        Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 1.7M views

        I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

        See more
        Adebayo Akinlaja
        Engineering Manager at Andela · | 26 upvotes · 846K views

        I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

        A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

        In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

        If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

        See more
        Jersey logo

        Jersey

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        5
        A REST framework that provides a JAX-RS implementation
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        + 1
        5
        PROS OF JERSEY
        • 3
          Lightweight
        • 1
          Fast Performance With Microservices
        • 1
          Java standard
        CONS OF JERSEY
          Be the first to leave a con

          related Jersey posts

          Spring logo

          Spring

          3.4K
          3.9K
          1K
          Provides a comprehensive programming and configuration model for modern Java-based enterprise applications
          3.4K
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          PROS OF SPRING
          • 221
            Java
          • 155
            Open source
          • 133
            Great community
          • 120
            Very powerful
          • 111
            Enterprise
          • 62
            Lot of great subprojects
          • 59
            Easy setup
          • 44
            Convention , configuration, done
          • 38
            Standard
          • 29
            Love the logic
          • 12
            Good documentation
          • 10
            Dependency injection
          • 10
            Stability
          • 7
            MVC
          • 6
            Easy
          • 3
            Strong typing
          • 3
            Makes the hard stuff fun & the easy stuff automatic
          • 2
            Maven
          • 2
            Code maintenance
          • 2
            Best practices
          • 2
            Great Desgin
          • 2
            Easy Integration with Spring Security
          • 2
            Integrations with most other Java frameworks
          • 1
            Java has more support and more libraries
          • 1
            Supports vast databases
          • 1
            Large ecosystem with seamless integration
          • 1
            OracleDb integration
          • 1
            Live project
          CONS OF SPRING
          • 15
            Draws you into its own ecosystem and bloat
          • 3
            Verbose configuration
          • 3
            Poor documentation
          • 3
            Java
          • 1
            Java is more verbose language in compare to python

          related Spring posts

          Is learning Spring and Spring Boot for web apps back-end development is still relevant in 2021? Feel free to share your views with comparison to Django/Node.js/ ExpressJS or other frameworks.

          Please share some good beginner resources to start learning about spring/spring boot framework to build the web apps.

          See more

          I am consulting for a company that wants to move its current CubeCart e-commerce site to another PHP based platform like PrestaShop or Magento. I was interested in alternatives that utilize Node.js as the primary platform. I currently don't know PHP, but I have done full stack dev with Java, Spring, Thymeleaf, etc.. I am just unsure that learning a set of technologies not commonly used makes sense. For example, in PrestaShop, I would need to work with JavaScript better and learn PHP, Twig, and Bootstrap. It seems more cumbersome than a Node JS system, where the language syntax stays the same for the full stack. I am looking for thoughts and advice on the relevance of PHP skillset into the future AND whether the Node based e-commerce open source options can compete with Magento or Prestashop.

          See more