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Blogger

536
73
+ 1
10
WordPress

78.9K
24.2K
+ 1
2K
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Blogger vs WordPress: What are the differences?

Developers describe Blogger as "Create a blog. It's free". Since Blogger was launched in 1999, blogs have reshaped the web, impacted politics, shaken up journalism, and enabled millions of people to have a voice and connect with others. On the other hand, WordPress is detailed as "A semantic personal publishing platform with a focus on aesthetics, web standards, and usability". The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.

Blogger can be classified as a tool in the "Hosted Blogging Platforms" category, while WordPress is grouped under "Self-Hosted Blogging / CMS".

Some of the features offered by Blogger are:

  • Publish your thoughts
  • Engage your friends
  • Design your blog

On the other hand, WordPress provides the following key features:

  • Flexibility
  • Publishing Tools
  • User Management

"Free and nice" is the primary reason why developers consider Blogger over the competitors, whereas "Customizable" was stated as the key factor in picking WordPress.

WordPress is an open source tool with 12.6K GitHub stars and 7.69K GitHub forks. Here's a link to WordPress's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, WordPress has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5305 company stacks & 1389 developers stacks; compared to Blogger, which is listed in 6 company stacks and 9 developer stacks.

Decisions about Blogger and WordPress
Xander Groesbeek
Founder at Rate My Meeting · | 5 upvotes · 101.3K views

So many choices for CMSs these days. So then what do you choose if speed, security and customization are key? Headless for one. Consuming your own APIs for content is absolute key. It makes designing pages in the front-end a breeze. Leaving Ghost and Cockpit. If I then looked at the footprint and impact on server load, Cockpit definitely wins that battle.

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10 Years ago I have started to check more about the online sphere and I have decided to make a website. There were a few CMS available at that time like WordPress or Joomla that you can use to have your website. At that point, I have decided to use WordPress as it was the easiest and I am glad I have made a good decision. Now WordPress is the most used CMS. Later I have created also a site about WordPress: https://www.wpdoze.com

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Dale Ross
Independent Contractor at Self Employed · | 22 upvotes · 896.1K views

I've heard that I have the ability to write well, at times. When it flows, it flows. I decided to start blogging in 2013 on Blogger. I started a company and joined BizPark with the Microsoft Azure allotment. I created a WordPress blog and did a migration at some point. A lot happened in the time after that migration but I stopped coding and changed cities during tumultuous times that taught me many lessons concerning mental health and productivity. I eventually graduated from BizSpark and outgrew the credit allotment. That killed the WordPress blog.

I blogged about writing again on the existing Blogger blog but it didn't feel right. I looked at a few options where I wouldn't have to worry about hosting cost indefinitely and Jekyll stood out with GitHub Pages. The Importer was fairly straightforward for the existing blog posts.

Todo * Set up redirects for all posts on blogger. The URI format is different so a complete redirect wouldn't work. Although, there may be something in Jekyll that could manage the redirects. I did notice the old URLs were stored in the front matter. I'm working on a command-line Ruby gem for the current plan. * I did find some of the lost WordPress posts on archive.org that I downloaded with the waybackmachinedownloader. I think I might write an importer for that. * I still have a few Disqus comment threads to map

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Pros of Blogger
Pros of WordPress
  • 7
    Free and nice
  • 2
    Widegets
  • 1
    Settings of the blog pags :v
  • 408
    Customizable
  • 359
    Easy to manage
  • 349
    Plugins & themes
  • 258
    Non-tech colleagues can update website content
  • 245
    Really powerful
  • 143
    Rapid website development
  • 76
    Best documentation
  • 50
    Codex
  • 43
    Product feature set
  • 34
    Custom/internal social network
  • 13
    Open source
  • 7
    Great for all types of websites
  • 5
    Huge install and user base
  • 4
    Best
  • 4
    It's simple and easy to use by any novice
  • 4
    Most websites make use of it
  • 4
    Open Source Community
  • 4
    Perfect example of user collaboration
  • 4
    I like it like I like a kick in the groin
  • 3
    Community
  • 3
    API-based CMS
  • 2
    Easy To use
  • 1
    <a href="https://secure.wphackedhel">Easy Beginner</a>

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Cons of Blogger
Cons of WordPress
    Be the first to leave a con
    • 11
      Hard to keep up-to-date if you customize things
    • 10
      Plugins are of mixed quality
    • 8
      Not best backend UI
    • 1
      Complex Organization
    • 1
      Great Security

    Sign up to add or upvote consMake informed product decisions

    - No public GitHub repository available -

    What is Blogger?

    Since Blogger was launched in 1999, blogs have reshaped the web, impacted politics, shaken up journalism, and enabled millions of people to have a voice and connect with others.

    What is WordPress?

    The core software is built by hundreds of community volunteers, and when you’re ready for more there are thousands of plugins and themes available to transform your site into almost anything you can imagine. Over 60 million people have chosen WordPress to power the place on the web they call “home” — we’d love you to join the family.

    Need advice about which tool to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

    What companies use Blogger?
    What companies use WordPress?
    See which teams inside your own company are using Blogger or WordPress.
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    Sign up to get full access to all the companiesMake informed product decisions

    What tools integrate with Blogger?
    What tools integrate with WordPress?

    Sign up to get full access to all the tool integrationsMake informed product decisions

    What are some alternatives to Blogger and WordPress?
    Tumblr
    Tumblr is a feature rich and free blog hosting platform offering professional and fully customizable templates, bookmarklets, photos, mobile apps, and social network. The site now ranks as the 11th-largest in terms of traffic, according to Quantcast, with 170 million monthly visitors globally.
    Wix
    Creating your stunning website for free is easier than ever. No tech skills needed. Just pick a template, change anything you want, add your images, videos, text and more to get online instantly.
    Medium
    Medium is a different kind of place on the internet. A place where the measure of success isn’t views, but viewpoints. Where the quality of the idea matters, not the author’s qualifications. A place where conversation pushes ideas forward.
    Google Sites
    It is a free and easy way to create and share webpages. Its goal is for anyone to be able to create simple web sites that support collaboration between different editors.
    Weebly
    Weebly is an AJAX website creator that allows you to create pages with template skins and content widgets. Users can easily drag-and-drop content widgets like pictures, text, video and Google Maps in WYSIWYG-fashion.
    See all alternatives