Elixir vs Objective-C

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Elixir
Elixir

1.6K
1.4K
+ 1
900
Objective-C
Objective-C

4.4K
2.2K
+ 1
490
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Elixir vs Objective-C: What are the differences?

Developers describe Elixir as "Dynamic, functional language designed for building scalable and maintainable applications". Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain. On the other hand, Objective-C is detailed as "The primary programming language you use when writing software for OS X and iOS". Objective-C is a superset of the C programming language and provides object-oriented capabilities and a dynamic runtime. Objective-C inherits the syntax, primitive types, and flow control statements of C and adds syntax for defining classes and methods. It also adds language-level support for object graph management and object literals while providing dynamic typing and binding, deferring many responsibilities until runtime.

Elixir and Objective-C can be categorized as "Languages" tools.

"Concurrency", "Functional" and "Erlang vm" are the key factors why developers consider Elixir; whereas "Ios", "Xcode" and "Backed by apple" are the primary reasons why Objective-C is favored.

Elixir is an open source tool with 15.6K GitHub stars and 2.22K GitHub forks. Here's a link to Elixir's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, Objective-C has a broader approval, being mentioned in 851 company stacks & 363 developers stacks; compared to Elixir, which is listed in 177 company stacks and 190 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Elixir?

Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain.

What is Objective-C?

Objective-C is a superset of the C programming language and provides object-oriented capabilities and a dynamic runtime. Objective-C inherits the syntax, primitive types, and flow control statements of C and adds syntax for defining classes and methods. It also adds language-level support for object graph management and object literals while providing dynamic typing and binding, deferring many responsibilities until runtime.
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    What are some alternatives to Elixir and Objective-C?
    Go
    Go is expressive, concise, clean, and efficient. Its concurrency mechanisms make it easy to write programs that get the most out of multicore and networked machines, while its novel type system enables flexible and modular program construction. Go compiles quickly to machine code yet has the convenience of garbage collection and the power of run-time reflection. It's a fast, statically typed, compiled language that feels like a dynamically typed, interpreted language.
    Erlang
    Some of Erlang's uses are in telecoms, banking, e-commerce, computer telephony and instant messaging. Erlang's runtime system has built-in support for concurrency, distribution and fault tolerance. OTP is set of Erlang libraries and design principles providing middle-ware to develop these systems.
    Clojure
    Clojure is designed to be a general-purpose language, combining the approachability and interactive development of a scripting language with an efficient and robust infrastructure for multithreaded programming. Clojure is a compiled language - it compiles directly to JVM bytecode, yet remains completely dynamic. Clojure is a dialect of Lisp, and shares with Lisp the code-as-data philosophy and a powerful macro system.
    Ruby
    Ruby is a language of careful balance. Its creator, Yukihiro “Matz” Matsumoto, blended parts of his favorite languages (Perl, Smalltalk, Eiffel, Ada, and Lisp) to form a new language that balanced functional programming with imperative programming.
    Rust
    Rust is a systems programming language that combines strong compile-time correctness guarantees with fast performance. It improves upon the ideas of other systems languages like C++ by providing guaranteed memory safety (no crashes, no data races) and complete control over the lifecycle of memory.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about Elixir and Objective-C
    StackShare Editors
    StackShare Editors
    Angular
    Angular
    jQuery
    jQuery
    Objective-C
    Objective-C
    Swift
    Swift
    Go
    Go
    Ruby
    Ruby
    Java
    Java
    React
    React
    Python
    Python
    Node.js
    Node.js
    Rails
    Rails

    By mid-2015, around the time of the Series E, the Digital department at WeWork had grown to more than 40 people to support the company’s growing product needs.

    By then, they’d migrated the main website off of WordPress to Ruby on Rails, and a combination React, Angular, and jQuery, though there were efforts to move entirely to React for the front-end.

    The backend was structured around a microservices architecture built partially in Node.js, along with a combination of Ruby, Python, Bash, and Go. Swift/Objective-C and Java powered the mobile apps.

    These technologies power the listings on the website, as well as various internal tools, like community manager dashboards as well as RFID hardware for access management.

    See more
    StackShare Editors
    StackShare Editors
    Objective-C
    Objective-C
    Gradle
    Gradle
    Swift
    Swift
    Java
    Java

    At the heart of Uber’s mobile app development are four primary apps: Android rider, Android driver, iOS rider, and iOS driver. Android developers build in Java, iOS in Objective C and Swift. Engineers across both platforms land code into a monolithic code base that ships each week.

    They use some third-party libraries, but often build their own, since “Many open source libraries available are general-purpose, which can create binary bloat. For mobile engineering, every kilobyte matters.”

    On Android, the build system is Gradle. For the UI, Butter Knife binds views and callbacks to fields and methods via annotation processing, and Picasso provides image loading.

    As for iOS, all of the code lives in a monorepo built with Buck. For crash detection, KSCrash reports crashes to the internal reporting framework.

    See more
    StackShare Editors
    StackShare Editors
    Erlang
    Erlang
    Elixir
    Elixir
    Consul
    Consul

    Postmates built a tool called Bazaar that helps onboard new partners and handles several routine tasks, like nightly emails to merchants alerting them about items that are out of stock.

    Since they ran Bazaar across multiple instances, the team needed to avoid sending multiple emails to their partners by obtaining lock across multiple hosts. To solve their challenge, they created and open sourced ConsulMutEx, and an Elixir module for acquiring and releasing locks with Consul and other backends.

    It works with Consul’s KV store, as well as other backends, including ets, Erlang’s in-memory database.

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    Conor Myhrvold
    Conor Myhrvold
    Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 8 upvotes · 422K views
    atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
    RIBs
    RIBs
    Swift
    Swift
    Objective-C
    Objective-C

    Excerpts from how we developed (and subsequently open sourced) Uber's cross-platform mobile architecture framework, RIBs , going from Objective-C to Swift in the process for iOS: https://github.com/uber/RIBs

    Uber’s new application architecture (RIBs) extensively uses protocols to keep its various components decoupled and testable. We used this architecture for the first time in our new rider application and moved our primary language from Objective-C to Swift. Since Swift is a very static language, unit testing became problematic. Dynamic languages have good frameworks to build test mocks, stubs, or stand-ins by dynamically creating or modifying existing concrete classes.

    Needless to say, we were not very excited about the additional complexity of manually writing and maintaining mock implementations for each of our thousands of protocols.

    The information required to generate mock classes already exists in the Swift protocol. For Uber’s use case, we set out to create tooling that would let engineers automatically generate test mocks for any protocol they wanted by simply annotating them.

    The iOS codebase for our rider application alone incorporates around 1,500 of these generated mocks. Without our code generation tool, all of these would have to be written and maintained by hand, which would have made testing much more time-intensive. Auto-generated mocks have contributed a lot to the unit test coverage that we have today.

    We built these code generation tools ourselves for a number of reasons, including that there weren’t many open source tools available at the time we started our effort. Today, there are some great open source tools to generate resource accessors, like SwiftGen. And Sourcery can help you with generic code generation needs:

    https://eng.uber.com/code-generation/ https://eng.uber.com/driver-app-ribs-architecture/

    (GitHub : https://github.com/uber/RIBs )

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    Sebastian Gębski
    Sebastian Gębski
    CTO at Shedul/Fresha · | 7 upvotes · 39.1K views
    atFresha EngineeringFresha Engineering
    AppSignal
    AppSignal
    Hex
    Hex
    Credo
    Credo
    Erlang
    Erlang
    Phoenix Framework
    Phoenix Framework
    Elixir
    Elixir

    Another major decision was to adopt Elixir and Phoenix Framework - the DX (Developer eXperience) is pretty similar to what we know from RoR, but this tech is running on the top of rock-solid Erlang platform which is powering planet-scale telecom solutions for 20+ years. So we're getting pretty much the best from both worlds: minimum friction & smart conventions that eliminate the excessive boilerplate AND highly concurrent EVM (Erlang's Virtual Machine) that makes all the scalability problems vanish. The transition was very smooth - none of Ruby developers we had decided to leave because of Elixir. What is more, we kept recruiting Ruby developers w/o any requirement regarding Elixir proficiency & we still were able to educate them internally in almost no time. Obviously Elixir comes with some more tools in the stack: Credo , Hex , AppSignal (required to properly monitor BEAM apps).

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    Interest over time
    Reviews of Elixir and Objective-C
    Review ofElixirElixir

    i've give a try to Ruby, Crystal, Python and GO, and yeah, for web development i use Elixir-Phoenix, because idk why just amazing, my phoenix app is very stable (comparing to api that written in other language), Ruby is slow, Crystal has unstable API, GO, umm yeah, you need too complicated (i use golang for microservice)

    How developers use Elixir and Objective-C
    Avatar of Instacart
    Instacart uses Objective-CObjective-C

    Basically, the trajectory was we had our iOS app, which started out native, right? It started as a native app, and then we realized you have to go through a review process and it’s slow, and at a very early stage, it made sense for us to make it a wrapped web view. Basically, the app would open, and it would be a web view inside of it that we could iterate on quickly and change very rapidly and not have to wait for app store view process to change it. It wasn’t totally a native experience, but it was as actually a pretty good experience and lasted for a very long time and was up until recently the foundation of our current mobile web experience, which is different from our app situation. So for a long time, basically, our app store iOS Instacart app was a wrapped web view of just our store, a condensed version of our store, which meant that we could add things. We could change sales. We could change the formatting. We could change the UI really fast and not have to worry about the app store review process.

    This all changed about a year ago, I would like to say, at which point it became a totally native app. We felt comfortable enough with the product and all the features that we made it a native experience and made it a fully featured app.

    Avatar of Refractal
    Refractal uses Objective-CObjective-C

    While the majority of our stack is now using Swift, we still love Objective-C in many cases, especially low-level software manipulation, where it's just easier. It doesn't hurt that a lot of iOS/OS X Libraries out there are written in it either.

    Avatar of SmartLogic
    SmartLogic uses Objective-CObjective-C

    We like to go native with iOS development, and Objective-C has been the only game in town until recent introduction of Swift. We're keeping an eye on Swift, but we aren't giving up on the [old way:to do:things]!

    Avatar of Provide Booking
    Provide Booking uses ElixirElixir

    Huge boon to productivity when coupled with Phoenix. Moreover, it has made background jobs and all the unseen aspects of a business easily abstracted.

    Avatar of DailySMSCollection
    DailySMSCollection uses Objective-CObjective-C
    Avatar of Promethean TV
    Promethean TV uses Objective-CObjective-C

    PrometheanTV provides SDKs for IOS devices including support for the Objective-C language.

    Avatar of Walter
    Walter uses ElixirElixir

    Knowledge collection, collation, and enrichment. Business logic.

    Avatar of Ruben Timmerman
    Ruben Timmerman uses ElixirElixir

    For some internal tools like our email deliverability monitor

    Avatar of Ryan Jennings
    Ryan Jennings uses ElixirElixir

    language used by phoenix framework

    Avatar of olenderhub
    olenderhub uses ElixirElixir

    Elixir and Phoenix are awesome.

    How much does Elixir cost?
    How much does Objective-C cost?
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