ES6 vs TypeScript

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ES6 vs TypeScript: What are the differences?

What is ES6? The next version of JavaScript. Goals for ECMAScript 2015 include providing better support for large applications, library creation, and for use of ECMAScript as a compilation target for other languages. Some of its major enhancements include modules, class declarations, lexical block scoping, iterators and generators, promises for asynchronous programming, destructuring patterns, and proper tail calls.

What is TypeScript? A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output. TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.

ES6 belongs to "Languages" category of the tech stack, while TypeScript can be primarily classified under "Templating Languages & Extensions".

"ES6 code is shorter than traditional JS" is the primary reason why developers consider ES6 over the competitors, whereas "More intuitive and type safe javascript" was stated as the key factor in picking TypeScript.

TypeScript is an open source tool with 51.1K GitHub stars and 7.06K GitHub forks. Here's a link to TypeScript's open source repository on GitHub.

Slack, StackShare, and ebay are some of the popular companies that use ES6, whereas TypeScript is used by Slack, Asana, and Rainist. ES6 has a broader approval, being mentioned in 1461 company stacks & 1725 developers stacks; compared to TypeScript, which is listed in 982 company stacks and 1447 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is ES6?

Goals for ECMAScript 2015 include providing better support for large applications, library creation, and for use of ECMAScript as a compilation target for other languages. Some of its major enhancements include modules, class declarations, lexical block scoping, iterators and generators, promises for asynchronous programming, destructuring patterns, and proper tail calls.

What is TypeScript?

TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript.
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      What are some alternatives to ES6 and TypeScript?
      JavaScript
      JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.
      CoffeeScript
      It adds syntactic sugar inspired by Ruby, Python and Haskell in an effort to enhance JavaScript's brevity and readability. Specific additional features include list comprehension and de-structuring assignment.
      jQuery
      jQuery is a cross-platform JavaScript library designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML.
      PHP
      Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world.
      Python
      Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
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      Decisions about ES6 and TypeScript
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      Slack's new desktop application was launched for macOS. It was built using Electron for a faster, frameless look with a host of background improvements for a superior Slack experience. Instead of adopting a complete-in-box approach taken by other apps, Slack prefers a hybrid approach where some of the assets are loaded as part of the app, while others are made available remotely. Slack's original desktop app was written using the MacGap v1 framework using WebView to host web content within the native app frame. But it was difficult to upgrade with new features only available to Apple's WKWebView and moving to this view called for a total application rewrite.

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      Hampton Catlin
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      We use JavaScript because it's the standard for web development, especially with browser execution. And, over the years, some smart work by the W3C has taken Javascript from the most-hated-language to the okay-I-can-make-that-good. No small feat!

      Obviously, using ES6 and TypeScript is what makes it decent in browser contexts. Throw in a bit of React and now we're cooking with gas!

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