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gulp vs Travis CI: What are the differences?

gulp: The streaming build system. Build system automating tasks: minification and copying of all JavaScript files, static images. More capable of watching files to automatically rerun the task when a file changes; Travis CI: A hosted continuous integration service for open source and private projects. Free for open source projects, our CI environment provides multiple runtimes (e.g. Node.js or PHP versions), data stores and so on. Because of this, hosting your project on travis-ci.com means you can effortlessly test your library or applications against multiple runtimes and data stores without even having all of them installed locally.

gulp and Travis CI are primarily classified as "JS Build Tools / JS Task Runners" and "Continuous Integration" tools respectively.

Some of the features offered by gulp are:

  • By preferring code over configuration, gulp keeps simple things simple and makes complex tasks manageable.
  • By harnessing the power of node's streams you get fast builds that don't write intermediary files to disk.
  • gulp's strict plugin guidelines assure plugins stay simple and work the way you expect.

On the other hand, Travis CI provides the following key features:

  • Easy Setup- Getting started with Travis CI is as easy as enabling a project, adding basic build instructions to your project and committing code.
  • Supports Your Platform- Lots of databases and services are pre-installed and can simply be enabled in your build configuration, we'll launch them for you automatically. MySQL, PostgreSQL, ElasticSearch, Redis, Riak, RabbitMQ, Memcached are available by default.
  • Deploy With Confidence- Deploying to production after a successful build is as easy as setting up a bit of configuration, and we'll deploy your code to Heroku, Engine Yard Cloud, Nodejitsu, cloudControl, OpenShift, and CloudFoundry.

"Build speed", "Readable" and "Code-over-configuration" are the key factors why developers consider gulp; whereas "Github integration", "Free for open source" and "Easy to get started" are the primary reasons why Travis CI is favored.

gulp is an open source tool with 31.3K GitHub stars and 4.4K GitHub forks. Here's a link to gulp's open source repository on GitHub.

According to the StackShare community, gulp has a broader approval, being mentioned in 1158 company stacks & 690 developers stacks; compared to Travis CI, which is listed in 666 company stacks and 613 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is gulp?

Build system automating tasks: minification and copying of all JavaScript files, static images. More capable of watching files to automatically rerun the task when a file changes.

What is Travis CI?

Free for open source projects, our CI environment provides multiple runtimes (e.g. Node.js or PHP versions), data stores and so on. Because of this, hosting your project on travis-ci.com means you can effortlessly test your library or applications against multiple runtimes and data stores without even having all of them installed locally.
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    What are some alternatives to gulp and Travis CI?
    Grunt
    The less work you have to do when performing repetitive tasks like minification, compilation, unit testing, linting, etc, the easier your job becomes. After you've configured it, a task runner can do most of that mundane work for you—and your team—with basically zero effort.
    Webpack
    A bundler for javascript and friends. Packs many modules into a few bundled assets. Code Splitting allows to load parts for the application on demand. Through "loaders" modules can be CommonJs, AMD, ES6 modules, CSS, Images, JSON, Coffeescript, LESS, ... and your custom stuff.
    npm
    npm is the command-line interface to the npm ecosystem. It is battle-tested, surprisingly flexible, and used by hundreds of thousands of JavaScript developers every day.
    Yarn
    Yarn caches every package it downloads so it never needs to again. It also parallelizes operations to maximize resource utilization so install times are faster than ever.
    CodeKit
    Process Less, Sass, Stylus, Jade, Haml, Slim, CoffeeScript, Javascript, and Compass files automatically each time you save. Easily set options for each language.
    See all alternatives
    Decisions about gulp and Travis CI
    Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
    Jesus Dario Rivera Rubio
    Telecomm Engineering at Netbeast · | 10 upvotes · 125.2K views
    atNetbeastNetbeast
    Mailjet
    Mailjet
    Intercom
    Intercom
    Amplitude
    Amplitude
    Firebase
    Firebase
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Bitrise
    Bitrise
    Travis CI
    Travis CI
    Objective-C
    Objective-C
    Android SDK
    Android SDK
    React Native
    React Native
    #End2end
    #SmartHome

    We are using React Native in #SmartHome to share the business logic between Android and iOS team and approach users with a unique brand experience. The drawback is that we require lots of native Android SDK and Objective-C modules, so a good part of the invested time is there. The gain for a app that relies less on native communication, sensors and OS tools should be even higher.

    Also it helps us set different testing stages: we use Travis CI for the javascript (business logic), Bitrise to run build tests and @Detox for #end2end automated user tests.

    We use a microservices structure on top of Zeit's @now that read from firebase. We use JWT auth to authenticate requests among services and from users, following GitHub philosophy of using the same infrastructure than its API consumers. Firebase is used mainly as a key-value store between services and as a backup database for users. We also use its authentication mechanisms.

    You can be super locked-in if you also rely on it's analytics, but we use Amplitude for that, which offers us great insights. Intercom for communications with end-user and Mailjet for marketing.

    See more
    Travis CI
    Travis CI
    CircleCI
    CircleCI

    I initially chose CircleCI for a personal project because I was not satisified with using Travis CI in the past. When it came time to develop my CI/CD config on Circle, I was pleasantly surprised with the fantastic documentation, invaluable collection of example configs and helpful support provided. The free tier they provide is quite robust for most small projects and the platform is updated frequently with nice features.

    Areas where CircleCI could improve:

    • the UI is a bit slow (you can feel the local machine straining to load all the code) and it is not as intuitive as it could be
    • many UI elements receive updates and/or changes that are not always reflected in the current docs
    See more
    GitHub
    GitHub
    Appveyor
    Appveyor
    Travis CI
    Travis CI

    I recommend using Travis CI and/or Appveyor in all projects.

    Projects using these tools have given me confidence to know that I don't cause any breaking changes. Travis CI and Appveyor have functionality to test components of a project across multiple installation projects to ensure that modifications don't break a project. These tools integrate easily with GitHub and are useful in open source projects that must review contributions from many different people.

    See more
    Tim Abbott
    Tim Abbott
    Founder at Zulip · | 12 upvotes · 33.4K views
    atZulipZulip
    CircleCI
    CircleCI
    Travis CI
    Travis CI

    We actually started out on Travis CI, but we've migrated our main builds to CircleCI, and it's been a huge improvement.

    The reason it's been a huge improvement is that Travis CI has a fundamentally bad design for their images, where they start with a standard base Linux image containing tons of packages (several versions of postgres, every programming language environment, etc). This is potentially nice for the "get builds for a small project running quickly" use case, but it's a total disaster for a larger project that needs a decent number of dependencies and cares about the performance and reliability of their build.

    This issue is exacerbated by their networking infrastructure being unreliable; we usually saw over 1% of builds failing due to transient networking errors in Travis CI, even after we added retries to the most frequently failing operations like apt update or pip install. And they never install Ubuntu's point release updates to their images. So doing an apt update, apt install, or especially apt upgrade would take forever. We ended up writing code to actually uninstall many of their base packages and pin the versions of hundreds of others to get a semi-fast, semi-reliable build. It was infuriating.

    The CircleCI v2.0 system has the right design for a CI system: we can customize the base image to start with any expensive-to-install packages we need for our build, and we can update that image if and when we want to. The end result is that when migrating, we were able to delete all the hacky optimizations mentioned above, while still ending up with a 50% faster build latency. And we've also had 5-10x fewer issues with networking-related flakes, which means one doesn't have to constantly check whether a build failure is actually due to an issue with the code under test or "just another networking flake".

    See more
    Travis CI
    Travis CI
    CircleCI
    CircleCI
    Google Cloud Build
    Google Cloud Build

    I use Google Cloud Build because it's my first foray into the CICD world(loving it so far), and I wanted to work with something GCP native to avoid giving permissions to other SaaS tools like CircleCI and Travis CI.

    I really like it because it's free for the first 120 minutes, and it's one of the few CICD tools that enterprises are open to using since it's contained within GCP.

    One of the unique things is that it has the Kaniko cache, which speeds up builds by creating intermediate layers within the docker image vs. pushing the full thing from the start. Helpful when you're installing just a few additional dependencies.

    Feel free to checkout an example: Cloudbuild Example

    See more
    Webpack
    Webpack
    gulp
    gulp
    jQuery
    jQuery
    JavaScript
    JavaScript

    I use JavaScript these days and for few years I didn't have to use jQuery at all. I used to use it back in the days when IE8 and similar was a thing. But due to better browser support of native functions for DOM manipulation I could move to vanilla JavaScript. Most of the time, that's all I need to work with modals/accordions and similar. But I'm not saying that jQuery is bad. It was, and still is a great tool. Some of it's features are available in all browsers nowadays so it is not so important as it used to be. But jQuery has still advantage for example in it's selector engine, some DOM selections which are easy in jQuery are a bit more difficult in vanilla JS (you have to create some helper functions or use some 3rd party library to help you with that), but to be honest I needed this on very few occasions. So it really depends on your project (supported browses, plain JS or some bundling - gulp, Webpack, whether you plan to use modules etc.). Hope this helps.

    See more
    Gustavo Muñoz
    Gustavo Muñoz
    Web UI Developer at Globant · | 4 upvotes · 15.1K views
    Parcel
    Parcel
    gulp
    gulp
    Grunt
    Grunt
    Webpack
    Webpack
    #WebPackDevServer
    #Merge

    Using Webpack is one of the best decision ever. I have used to Grunt and gulp previously, but the experience is not the same, and despite I know there are other bundlers like Parcel, Webpack gives me the perfect balance between automatization and configuration. The ecosystem of tools and loaders is amazing, and with WebPack #merge, you can modularize your build and define standard pieces to assemble different build configurations. I don't like processes where you cannot see their guts, and you have to trust in magic a little bit too much for my taste. But also I don't want to reinvent the wheel and lose too much time configuring my build processes. And of course, I love #WebPackDevServer and hot reloading.

    See more
    Interest over time
    Reviews of gulp and Travis CI
    Avatar of tschellenbach
    CEO at Stream
    Review ofTravis CITravis CI

    In the past we used to run Jenkins. The build server always had weird issues and was a pain to maintain. Travis is a great solution for CI. Their Debug build features makes it trivial to figure out why your build broke. The integration with Github is also very slick. One thing they could improve is the documentation on the .travis.yaml format. All in all, great company and very responsive supports. Over here at getstream.io we're a fan. Keep up the good work guys!

    Avatar of gdi2290
    Co-Founder and CTO at Tipe
    Review ofgulpgulp

    Gulp is a new build system which shows a lot of promise. The use of streams and code-over-configuration makes for a simpler and more intuitive build. There isn't much boilerplate code so you're able to roll your own asset pipeline. Even if you don't know node.js streams, gulp is pretty readable and easier to understand.

    PS: It's worth saying if you know Grunt then you can learn Gulp in a day.

    Avatar of longgge
    pm at 36kr
    Review ofgulpgulp

    love it!l like gulp‘s logo!

    How developers use gulp and Travis CI
    Avatar of Cloudcraft
    Cloudcraft uses gulpgulp

    Gulp is used as the build system for Cloudcraft.co with a lot of custom targets: vendoring dependencies, transpiling ES2015 to Ecmascript5 (with Babel), incremental compilation of multiple watched modules, minification, creation of app distribution packages etc. Having previously used Grunt, I've come to greatly prefer Gulp due to the ability to easily write my own tasks using plain JS without necessarily relying on plugins for everything.

    Avatar of datapile
    datapile uses Travis CITravis CI

    Travis CI is our pillar for automated deployment, pull request testing, auto-merging (for non-mission-critical projects), and build testing per commit / release.

    It is highly configurable, super cheap, and extremely robust (supports every language and configuration we've thrown at it).

    Avatar of Pēteris Caune
    Pēteris Caune uses Travis CITravis CI

    While we usually run tests before commits, Travis goes further and tests with different Python versions and different database backends. It works great, and, best of all, it is free for open source projects.

    Avatar of Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)
    Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) uses gulpgulp

    gulp is used to package our plugins for the WSC (Woltlab Suite Core) in a fast, convenient and code-driven way. We enjoy the comfort it offers with stuff like the gzip-plugin or tar-packing.

    Avatar of Refractal
    Refractal uses gulpgulp

    For all our frontend site builds, Grunt allows us to do one-click builds for SASS, Coffeescript and other tools, with minifying and general restructuring built right in.

    Avatar of Dieter Adriaenssens
    Dieter Adriaenssens uses Travis CITravis CI

    Travis CI builds and tests every commit. It's also used to deploy Buildtime Trend as a Service to Heroku and the Buildtime Trend Python library to the PyPi repository.

    Avatar of IVS
    IVS uses gulpgulp

    gulp is a fancy alternative to grunt (that we don't use anymore). Just use async/await instead of "stream" everything (which is a nonsens). We don't use gulp.

    Avatar of Tinker Travel
    Tinker Travel uses gulpgulp

    If a project has a more complex build, gulp allows us to build a flexible build pipeline and automatically rebuild on files changes. Speeds up JS development.

    Avatar of Nate Ferrell
    Nate Ferrell uses Travis CITravis CI

    Travis CI is critical for Linux and macOS CI tests for the Powershell module. Travis runs the same tests we run in AppVeyor in parallel.

    Avatar of Andrew Williams
    Andrew Williams uses Travis CITravis CI

    To ensure that what works locally will also work for someone else. Also used to send code coverage to codeintel

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    How much does Travis CI cost?
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