Alternatives to CoreOS logo

Alternatives to CoreOS

Docker, LinuxKit, Rancher, Docker Swarm, and Ubuntu are the most popular alternatives and competitors to CoreOS.
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What is CoreOS and what are its top alternatives?

It is designed for security, consistency, and reliability. Instead of installing packages via yum or apt, it uses Linux containers to manage your services at a higher level of abstraction. A single service's code and all dependencies are packaged within a container that can be run on one or many machines.
CoreOS is a tool in the Operating Systems category of a tech stack.

CoreOS alternatives & related posts

related Docker posts

Tim Nolet
Tim Nolet
Founder, Engineer & Dishwasher at Checkly · | 19 upvotes · 223.4K views
atChecklyHQChecklyHQ
vuex
vuex
Knex.js
Knex.js
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Vue.js
Vue.js
hapi
hapi
Node.js
Node.js
GitHub
GitHub
Docker
Docker
Heroku
Heroku

Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

  • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
  • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
  • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
  • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
  • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

  1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
  2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
  3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
  4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

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Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 407.6K views
SonarQube
SonarQube
Codacy
Codacy
Docker
Docker
Git
Git
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Solr
Solr
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Heroku
Heroku
Hibernate
Hibernate
MySQL
MySQL
Node.js
Node.js
Java
Java
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery
jQuery
JavaScript
JavaScript
React Native
React Native
React Router
React Router
React
React

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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LinuxKit logo

LinuxKit

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A toolkit for building secure, portable and lean operating systems for containers
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LinuxKit
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CoreOS

related Docker Swarm posts

Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer · | 27 upvotes · 287.6K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Go
Go
TypeScript
TypeScript
JavaScript
JavaScript
C#
C#
F#
F#
.NET
.NET

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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Ubuntu logo

Ubuntu

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The leading OS for PC, tablet, phone and cloud
Ubuntu logo
Ubuntu
VS
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CoreOS

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Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 9 upvotes · 16.3K views
atZulipZulip
Fedora
Fedora
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Debian
Debian

We use Debian and its derivative Ubuntu because the apt ecosystem and toolchain for Debian packages is far superior to the yum-based system used by Fedora and RHEL. This is large part due to a huge amount of investment into tools like debhelper/dh over the years by the Debian community. I haven't dealt with RPM in the last couple years, but every experience I've had with RPM is that the RPM tools are slower, have less useful options, and it's more work to package software for them (and one makes more compromises in doing so).

I think everyone has seen the better experience using Ubuntu in the shift of prevalence from RHEL to Ubuntu in what most new companies are deploying on their servers, and I expect that trend to continue as long as Red Hat is using the RPM system (and I don't really see them as having a path to migrate).

The experience with Ubuntu and Debian stable releases is pretty similar: A solid release every 2 years that's supported for a few years. (While Ubuntu in theory releases every 6 months, their non-LTS releases are effectively betas: They're often unstable, only have 9 months of support, etc. I wouldn't recommend them to anyone not actively participating in Ubuntu the development community). Ubuntu has better integration of non-free drivers, which may be important if you have hardware that requires them. But it's also the case that most bugs I experience when using Ubuntu are Ubuntu-specific issues, especially on servers (in part because Ubuntu has a bunch of "cloud management" stuff pre-installed that is definitely a regression if you're not using Canonical's cloud management products).

See more
Marcel Kornegoor
Marcel Kornegoor
CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 102K views
atAT ComputingAT Computing
Python
Python
Chef
Chef
Puppet Labs
Puppet Labs
Ansible
Ansible
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Docker
Docker
GitHub
GitHub
VirtualBox
VirtualBox
Jenkins
Jenkins
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Fedora
Fedora
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Debian
Debian
CentOS
CentOS
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Linux
Linux
#ATComputing

Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

See more
Mesosphere logo

Mesosphere

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Combine your datacenter servers and cloud instances into one shared pool
Mesosphere logo
Mesosphere
VS
CoreOS logo
CoreOS
SmartOS logo

SmartOS

5
1
0
5
1
+ 1
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Converged Container and Virtual Machine Hypervisor
    Be the first to leave a pro
    SmartOS logo
    SmartOS
    VS
    CoreOS logo
    CoreOS
    CentOS logo

    CentOS

    4.6K
    1.9K
    11
    4.6K
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    The Community ENTerprise Operating System
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    Marcel Kornegoor
    Marcel Kornegoor
    CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 102K views
    atAT ComputingAT Computing
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    Puppet Labs
    Puppet Labs
    Ansible
    Ansible
    Google Compute Engine
    Google Compute Engine
    Kubernetes
    Kubernetes
    Docker
    Docker
    GitHub
    GitHub
    VirtualBox
    VirtualBox
    Jenkins
    Jenkins
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Fedora
    Fedora
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    Debian
    Debian
    CentOS
    CentOS
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    Linux
    Linux
    #ATComputing

    Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

    For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

    For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

    Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

    See more
    Paul Whittemore
    Paul Whittemore
    Developer and Owner at Appurist Software · | 1 upvotes · 4.4K views
    Windows
    Windows
    Visual Studio
    Visual Studio
    CentOS
    CentOS
    WebStorm
    WebStorm
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code

    Visual Studio Code on Centos and/or Windows is my go-to IDE for all web development (even though I have a license for WebStorm ... for now).

    Visual Studio on Windows for any C#/.NET development work.

    See more
    Debian logo

    Debian

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    The Universal Operating System
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    Labinator Team
    Labinator Team
    at Labinator · | 13 upvotes · 70.4K views
    atLabinatorLabinator
    Debian
    Debian
    Manjaro
    Manjaro
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Sublime Text
    Sublime Text
    WordPress
    WordPress
    PHP
    PHP
    Vanilla.JS
    Vanilla.JS
    Sass
    Sass
    CSS 3
    CSS 3
    HTML5
    HTML5

    At labinator.com, we use HTML5, CSS 3, Sass, Vanilla.JS and PHP when building our premium WordPress themes and plugins. When writing our codes, we use Sublime Text and Visual Studio Code depending on the project. We run Manjaro and Debian operating systems in our office. Manjaro is a great desktop operating system for all range of tasks while Debian is a solid choice for servers.

    WordPress became a very popular choice when it comes to content management systems and building websites. It is easy to learn and has a great community behind it. The high number of plugins as well that are available for WordPress allows any user to customize it depending on his/her needs.

    For development, HTML5 with Sass is our go-to choice when building our themes.

    Main Advantages Of Sass:

    • It's CSS syntax friendly
    • It offers variables
    • It uses a nested syntax
    • It includes mixins
    • Great community and online support.
    • Great documentation that is easy to read and follow.

    As for PHP, we always thrive to use PHP 7.3+. After the introduction of PHP 7, the WordPress development process became more stable and reliable than before. If you a developer considering PHP 7.3+ for your project, it would be good to note the following benefits.

    The Benefits Of Using PHP:

    • Open Source.
    • Highly Extendible.
    • Easy to learn and read.
    • Platform independent.
    • Compatible with APACHE.
    • Low development and maintenance cost.
    • Great community and support.
    • Detailed documentation that has everything you need!

    Why PHP 7.3+?

    • Flexible Heredoc & Nowdoc Syntaxes - Two key methods for defining strings within PHP. They also became easier to read and more reliable.
    • A good boost in performance speed which is extremely important when it comes to WordPress development.
    See more
    Tim Abbott
    Tim Abbott
    Founder at Zulip · | 9 upvotes · 16.3K views
    atZulipZulip
    Fedora
    Fedora
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    Debian
    Debian

    We use Debian and its derivative Ubuntu because the apt ecosystem and toolchain for Debian packages is far superior to the yum-based system used by Fedora and RHEL. This is large part due to a huge amount of investment into tools like debhelper/dh over the years by the Debian community. I haven't dealt with RPM in the last couple years, but every experience I've had with RPM is that the RPM tools are slower, have less useful options, and it's more work to package software for them (and one makes more compromises in doing so).

    I think everyone has seen the better experience using Ubuntu in the shift of prevalence from RHEL to Ubuntu in what most new companies are deploying on their servers, and I expect that trend to continue as long as Red Hat is using the RPM system (and I don't really see them as having a path to migrate).

    The experience with Ubuntu and Debian stable releases is pretty similar: A solid release every 2 years that's supported for a few years. (While Ubuntu in theory releases every 6 months, their non-LTS releases are effectively betas: They're often unstable, only have 9 months of support, etc. I wouldn't recommend them to anyone not actively participating in Ubuntu the development community). Ubuntu has better integration of non-free drivers, which may be important if you have hardware that requires them. But it's also the case that most bugs I experience when using Ubuntu are Ubuntu-specific issues, especially on servers (in part because Ubuntu has a bunch of "cloud management" stuff pre-installed that is definitely a regression if you're not using Canonical's cloud management products).

    See more
    Linux logo

    Linux

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    A family of free and open source software operating systems based on the Linux kernel
    Linux logo
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    VS
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    CoreOS

    related Linux posts

    Marcel Kornegoor
    Marcel Kornegoor
    CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 102K views
    atAT ComputingAT Computing
    Python
    Python
    Chef
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    Puppet Labs
    Puppet Labs
    Ansible
    Ansible
    Google Compute Engine
    Google Compute Engine
    Kubernetes
    Kubernetes
    Docker
    Docker
    GitHub
    GitHub
    VirtualBox
    VirtualBox
    Jenkins
    Jenkins
    Visual Studio Code
    Visual Studio Code
    Fedora
    Fedora
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux
    Debian
    Debian
    CentOS
    CentOS
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu
    Linux
    Linux
    #ATComputing

    Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

    For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

    For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

    Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

    See more
    Arch Linux
    Arch Linux
    Linux
    Linux
    Ubuntu
    Ubuntu

    I once used Ubuntu as my exclusive Linux distro, but then I decided to switch my primary operating system to Arch Linux.

    While more difficult to install, Arch Linux offered more flexibility during the installation process which allowed me to customize my system to fit me perfectly. With Ubuntu, instead of installing everything i did want, I had to remove everything that I didn't need.

    See more
    Windows Server  logo

    Windows Server

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      Paul Whittemore
      Paul Whittemore
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      For those needing hosting on Windows or Windows Server too (and avoiding licensing hurdles), both Vultr and Amazon LightSail offer compelling choices, depending on how much compute power you need. Don't underestimate Amazon LightSail, especially for smaller or starting projects, but Vultr also offers an incremental $16 Windows option on top of their standard compute offerings.

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      Tim Abbott
      Tim Abbott
      Founder at Zulip · | 9 upvotes · 16.3K views
      atZulipZulip
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      We use Debian and its derivative Ubuntu because the apt ecosystem and toolchain for Debian packages is far superior to the yum-based system used by Fedora and RHEL. This is large part due to a huge amount of investment into tools like debhelper/dh over the years by the Debian community. I haven't dealt with RPM in the last couple years, but every experience I've had with RPM is that the RPM tools are slower, have less useful options, and it's more work to package software for them (and one makes more compromises in doing so).

      I think everyone has seen the better experience using Ubuntu in the shift of prevalence from RHEL to Ubuntu in what most new companies are deploying on their servers, and I expect that trend to continue as long as Red Hat is using the RPM system (and I don't really see them as having a path to migrate).

      The experience with Ubuntu and Debian stable releases is pretty similar: A solid release every 2 years that's supported for a few years. (While Ubuntu in theory releases every 6 months, their non-LTS releases are effectively betas: They're often unstable, only have 9 months of support, etc. I wouldn't recommend them to anyone not actively participating in Ubuntu the development community). Ubuntu has better integration of non-free drivers, which may be important if you have hardware that requires them. But it's also the case that most bugs I experience when using Ubuntu are Ubuntu-specific issues, especially on servers (in part because Ubuntu has a bunch of "cloud management" stuff pre-installed that is definitely a regression if you're not using Canonical's cloud management products).

      See more
      Marcel Kornegoor
      Marcel Kornegoor
      CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 102K views
      atAT ComputingAT Computing
      Python
      Python
      Chef
      Chef
      Puppet Labs
      Puppet Labs
      Ansible
      Ansible
      Google Compute Engine
      Google Compute Engine
      Kubernetes
      Kubernetes
      Docker
      Docker
      GitHub
      GitHub
      VirtualBox
      VirtualBox
      Jenkins
      Jenkins
      Visual Studio Code
      Visual Studio Code
      Fedora
      Fedora
      Red Hat Enterprise Linux
      Red Hat Enterprise Linux
      Debian
      Debian
      CentOS
      CentOS
      Ubuntu
      Ubuntu
      Linux
      Linux
      #ATComputing

      Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

      For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

      For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

      Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

      See more
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      iOS

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        CoreOS
        Windows logo

        Windows

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        A group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed by Microsoft
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        Paul Whittemore
        Paul Whittemore
        Developer and Owner at Appurist Software · | 4 upvotes · 20.1K views
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        For those needing hosting on Windows or Windows Server too (and avoiding licensing hurdles), both Vultr and Amazon LightSail offer compelling choices, depending on how much compute power you need. Don't underestimate Amazon LightSail, especially for smaller or starting projects, but Vultr also offers an incremental $16 Windows option on top of their standard compute offerings.

        See more
        Tim Abbott
        Tim Abbott
        Founder at Zulip · | 4 upvotes · 12.3K views
        atZulipZulip
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        Vagrant
        Vagrant

        We use Vagrant because it is the best toolchain for having a standardized development environment that is readily provisoned with just a single command on macOS, Linux, and Windows.

        There's a lot of things that could be better; the thing I dislike the most is how Vagrant configuration file is a Ruby script with weird semantics around conditionals, which makes it its own special language to learn. They would have been a lot better off with the configuration approach taken by Xen (where the configuration file was a straightforward Python system).

        Also, it's error messages are optimized too much for people developing Vagrant itself, and not enough for helping end users who are using Vagrant, which means one has to google often to figure out what the actual problem is.

        Still, I don't think there's a better alternative for a development environment that Just Works for hundreds of developers. Docker isn't really designed for the development environment use case in my view, since it's optimized for throwing away state and getting a clean one when you make changes, and that's sometimes really not what you want. And having to SSH into a remote development environment has significant latency and editor setup costs that in my view make it a backup plan, not the main way to do things.

        See more
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        macOS

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        The primary operating system for Apple's Mac family of computers
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        Tim Abbott
        Tim Abbott
        Founder at Zulip · | 4 upvotes · 12.3K views
        atZulipZulip
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        Vagrant
        Vagrant

        We use Vagrant because it is the best toolchain for having a standardized development environment that is readily provisoned with just a single command on macOS, Linux, and Windows.

        There's a lot of things that could be better; the thing I dislike the most is how Vagrant configuration file is a Ruby script with weird semantics around conditionals, which makes it its own special language to learn. They would have been a lot better off with the configuration approach taken by Xen (where the configuration file was a straightforward Python system).

        Also, it's error messages are optimized too much for people developing Vagrant itself, and not enough for helping end users who are using Vagrant, which means one has to google often to figure out what the actual problem is.

        Still, I don't think there's a better alternative for a development environment that Just Works for hundreds of developers. Docker isn't really designed for the development environment use case in my view, since it's optimized for throwing away state and getting a clean one when you make changes, and that's sometimes really not what you want. And having to SSH into a remote development environment has significant latency and editor setup costs that in my view make it a backup plan, not the main way to do things.

        See more
        Justin Dorfman
        Justin Dorfman
        Developer Evangelist at StackShare · | 4 upvotes · 6.5K views
        atStackShareStackShare
        macOS
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        CloudApp
        CloudApp
        #Skitch

        I use CloudApp because it saves me so much time and energy. I use it at the very least once an hour. When Skitch was shutdown I thought my life was over! CloudApp saved the day and gave me features that Skitch didn't have.

        If you write a lot of technical content (or any content for that matter) it is an invaluable tool. I'm not sure about Windows support but it integrates flawlessly with macOS. 🤘

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        Alpine Linux

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        Security-oriented, lightweight Linux distribution based on musl libc and busybox
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        FreeBSD

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        An operating system used to power modern servers, desktops, and embedded platforms
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        FreeBSD
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        Red Hat Enterprise Linux logo

        Red Hat Enterprise Linux

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        Secure Operating System and Platform for Enterprise Hybrid Clouds
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          Marcel Kornegoor
          Marcel Kornegoor
          CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 102K views
          atAT ComputingAT Computing
          Python
          Python
          Chef
          Chef
          Puppet Labs
          Puppet Labs
          Ansible
          Ansible
          Google Compute Engine
          Google Compute Engine
          Kubernetes
          Kubernetes
          Docker
          Docker
          GitHub
          GitHub
          VirtualBox
          VirtualBox
          Jenkins
          Jenkins
          Visual Studio Code
          Visual Studio Code
          Fedora
          Fedora
          Red Hat Enterprise Linux
          Red Hat Enterprise Linux
          Debian
          Debian
          CentOS
          CentOS
          Ubuntu
          Ubuntu
          Linux
          Linux
          #ATComputing

          Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

          For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

          For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

          Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

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          Arch Linux

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          A lightweight and flexible Linux distribution that tries to Keep It Simple.
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          Arch Linux
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          Arch Linux
          Arch Linux
          Linux
          Linux
          Ubuntu
          Ubuntu

          I once used Ubuntu as my exclusive Linux distro, but then I decided to switch my primary operating system to Arch Linux.

          While more difficult to install, Arch Linux offered more flexibility during the installation process which allowed me to customize my system to fit me perfectly. With Ubuntu, instead of installing everything i did want, I had to remove everything that I didn't need.

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          Linux Mint

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          The most popular desktop Linux distribution and the 3rd most widely used home operating system behind Microsoft Windows...
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          Linux Mint
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