Alternatives to Fisheye logo

Alternatives to Fisheye

Bitbucket, GitLab, Sourcegraph, Hound by Etsy, and OpenGrok are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Fisheye.
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What is Fisheye and what are its top alternatives?

FishEye provides a read-only window into your Subversion, Perforce, CVS, Git, and Mercurial repositories, all in one place. Keep a pulse on everything about your code: Visualize and report on activity, integrate source with JIRA issues, and search for commits, files, revisions, or people.
Fisheye is a tool in the Code Search category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Fisheye

  • Bitbucket

    Bitbucket

    Bitbucket gives teams one place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private Git repositories. Teams choose Bitbucket because it has a superior Jira integration, built-in CI/CD, & is free for up to 5 users. ...

  • GitLab

    GitLab

    GitLab offers git repository management, code reviews, issue tracking, activity feeds and wikis. Enterprises install GitLab on-premise and connect it with LDAP and Active Directory servers for secure authentication and authorization. A single GitLab server can handle more than 25,000 users but it is also possible to create a high availability setup with multiple active servers. ...

  • Sourcegraph

    Sourcegraph

    Sourcegraph is a universal code search tool that lets you find and fix things across ALL your code -- any code host, any repo, any language. Stay in flow and find your answers quickly with smart filters, and more. ...

  • Hound by Etsy

    Hound by Etsy

    Hound is an extremely fast source code search engine. The core is based on this article (and code) from Russ Cox: Regular Expression Matching with a Trigram Index. Hound itself is a static React frontend that talks to a Go backend. The backend keeps an up-to-date index for each repository and answers searches through a minimal API. ...

  • OpenGrok

    OpenGrok

    It is a fast and usable source code search and cross reference engine, written in Java. It helps you search, cross-reference and navigate your source tree. It can understand various program file formats and version control histories of many source code management systems. ...

Fisheye alternatives & related posts

Bitbucket logo

Bitbucket

29.3K
22.5K
2.8K
One place to plan projects, collaborate on code, test and deploy, all with free private repositories
29.3K
22.5K
+ 1
2.8K
PROS OF BITBUCKET
  • 904
    Free private repos
  • 397
    Simple setup
  • 345
    Nice ui and tools
  • 340
    Unlimited private repositories
  • 239
    Affordable git hosting
  • 122
    Integrates with many apis and services
  • 118
    Reliable uptime
  • 85
    Nice gui
  • 83
    Pull requests and code reviews
  • 57
    Very customisable
  • 15
    Mercurial repositories
  • 13
    SourceTree integration
  • 10
    JIRA integration
  • 9
    Track every commit to an issue in JIRA
  • 7
    Best free alternative to Github
  • 7
    Automatically share repositories with all your teammates
  • 7
    Deployment hooks
  • 6
    Compatible with Mac and Windows
  • 5
    Source Code Insight
  • 4
    Price
  • 4
    Login with Google
  • 4
    Create a wiki
  • 4
    Approve pull request button
  • 3
    #2 Atlassian Product after JIRA
  • 3
    Customizable pipelines
  • 2
    Also supports Mercurial
  • 2
    Unlimited Private Repos at no cost
  • 2
    Continuous Integration and Delivery
  • 1
    Mercurial Support
  • 1
    IAM
  • 1
    Issues tracker
  • 1
    Open source friendly
  • 1
    Teamcity
  • 1
    Multilingual interface
  • 1
    Academic license program
  • 1
    IAM integration
  • 0
    Free Private Repositories
CONS OF BITBUCKET
  • 19
    Not much community activity
  • 17
    Difficult to review prs because of confusing ui
  • 14
    Quite buggy
  • 10
    Managed by enterprise Java company
  • 8
    CI tool is not free of charge
  • 7
    Complexity with rights management
  • 6
    Only 5 collaborators for private repos
  • 4
    Slow performance
  • 2
    No AWS Codepipelines integration
  • 1
    No more Mercurial repositories
  • 1
    No server side git-hook support

related Bitbucket posts

Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 585.7K views

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

See more
Shared insights
on
GitHub
GitLab
Bitbucket

A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

  • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people’s permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
  • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations – such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship – for running and testing your code. However, there’s no built-in CI solution at the moment.
  • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors – such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

  • Wiki and project repositories
  • Project uploads
  • The configuration including webhooks and services
  • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

So go ahead with better understanding.

See more
GitLab logo

GitLab

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30K
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Open source self-hosted Git management software
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PROS OF GITLAB
  • 489
    Self hosted
  • 418
    Free
  • 332
    Has community edition
  • 236
    Easy setup
  • 235
    Familiar interface
  • 130
    Includes many features, including ci
  • 106
    Nice UI
  • 80
    Good integration with gitlabci
  • 52
    Simple setup
  • 32
    Has an official mobile app
  • 30
    Free private repository
  • 24
    Continuous Integration
  • 16
    Open source, great ui (like github)
  • 14
    Slack Integration
  • 9
    Full CI flow
  • 8
    User, group, and project access management is simple
  • 8
    Free and unlimited private git repos
  • 7
    Intuitive UI
  • 7
    All in one (Git, CI, Agile..)
  • 6
    Built-in CI
  • 4
    Both public and private Repositories
  • 3
    Mattermost Chat client
  • 3
    Integrated Docker Registry
  • 2
    It's fully integrated
  • 2
    Unlimited free repos & collaborators
  • 2
    I like the its runners and executors feature
  • 2
    CI
  • 2
    So easy to use
  • 2
    One-click install through DigitalOcean
  • 2
    It's powerful source code management tool
  • 2
    Excellent
  • 2
    Build/pipeline definition alongside code
  • 2
    Security and Stable
  • 2
    Issue system
  • 2
    Free private repos
  • 2
    Low maintenance cost due omnibus-deployment
  • 2
    On-premises
  • 1
    Powerful Continuous Integration System
  • 1
    Powerful software planning and maintaining tools
  • 1
    Groups of groups
  • 1
    Kubernetes integration with GitLab CI
  • 1
    Review Apps feature
  • 1
    Built-in Docker Registry
  • 1
    Dockerized
  • 1
    Beautiful
  • 1
    Wounderful
  • 1
    Opensource
  • 1
    Because is the best remote host for git repositories
  • 1
    Not Microsoft Owned
  • 1
    Full DevOps suite with Git
  • 1
    Many private repo
  • 1
    Native CI
  • 1
    HipChat intergration
  • 1
    Kubernetes Integration
  • 1
    Published IP list for whitelisting (gl-infra#434)
  • 1
    Great for team collaboration
  • 1
    It includes everything I need, all packaged with docker
  • 1
    Multilingual interface
  • 1
    The dashboard with deployed environments
  • 0
    Supports Radius/Ldap & Browser Code Edits
CONS OF GITLAB
  • 26
    Slow ui performance
  • 6
    Introduce breaking bugs every release
  • 5
    Insecure (no published IP list for whitelisting)
  • 0
    Built-in Docker Registry
  • 0
    Review Apps feature

related GitLab posts

Tim Abbott
Shared insights
on
GitHub
GitLab
at

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

See more
Joshua Dean KĂĽpper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 17 upvotes · 221.7K views

We use GitLab CI because of the great native integration as a part of the GitLab framework and the linting-capabilities it offers. The visualization of complex pipelines and the embedding within the project overview made Gitlab CI even more convenient. We use it for all projects, all deployments and as a part of GitLab Pages.

While we initially used the Shell-executor, we quickly switched to the Docker-executor and use it exclusively now.

We formerly used Jenkins but preferred to handle everything within GitLab . Aside from the unification of our infrastructure another motivation was the "configuration-in-file"-approach, that Gitlab CI offered, while Jenkins support of this concept was very limited and users had to resort to using the webinterface. Since the file is included within the repository, it is also version controlled, which was a huge plus for us.

See more
Sourcegraph logo

Sourcegraph

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78
7
Universal code search for every developer
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+ 1
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PROS OF SOURCEGRAPH
  • 4
    Understand the connections between code components
  • 3
    Discover why code works the way it does
CONS OF SOURCEGRAPH
    Be the first to leave a con

    related Sourcegraph posts

    Hound by Etsy logo

    Hound by Etsy

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    18
    0
    Lightning fast code searching made easy
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    PROS OF HOUND BY ETSY
      Be the first to leave a pro
      CONS OF HOUND BY ETSY
        Be the first to leave a con

        related Hound by Etsy posts

        OpenGrok logo

        OpenGrok

        2
        2
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        A wicked fast source browser
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        PROS OF OPENGROK
          Be the first to leave a pro
          CONS OF OPENGROK
            Be the first to leave a con

            related OpenGrok posts