Groovy vs JavaScript

Groovy
Groovy

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JavaScript
JavaScript

41.6K
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Groovy vs JavaScript: What are the differences?

Groovy: A dynamic language for the Java platform. Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve; JavaScript: Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions. JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

Groovy and JavaScript belong to "Languages" category of the tech stack.

"Java platform" is the primary reason why developers consider Groovy over the competitors, whereas "Can be used on frontend/backend" was stated as the key factor in picking JavaScript.

Groovy is an open source tool with 1.49K GitHub stars and 414 GitHub forks. Here's a link to Groovy's open source repository on GitHub.

Airbnb, Instagram, and ebay are some of the popular companies that use JavaScript, whereas Groovy is used by Starbucks, Cask, and PedidosYa. JavaScript has a broader approval, being mentioned in 5080 company stacks & 6471 developers stacks; compared to Groovy, which is listed in 79 company stacks and 73 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Groovy?

Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve.

What is JavaScript?

JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles.

Want advice about which of these to choose?Ask the StackShare community!

Why do developers choose Groovy?
Why do developers choose JavaScript?
What are the cons of using Groovy?
What are the cons of using JavaScript?
What companies use Groovy?
What companies use JavaScript?
What are some alternatives to Groovy and JavaScript?
Java
Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere!
Scala
Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them.
Kotlin
Kotlin is a statically typed programming language for the JVM, Android and the browser, 100% interoperable with Java
Python
Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best.
Gradle
Gradle is a build tool with a focus on build automation and support for multi-language development. If you are building, testing, publishing, and deploying software on any platform, Gradle offers a flexible model that can support the entire development lifecycle from compiling and packaging code to publishing web sites.
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What tools integrate with Groovy?
What tools integrate with JavaScript?
    No integrations found
    Decisions about Groovy and JavaScript
    Eli Hooten
    Eli Hooten
    CTO at Codecov · | 11 upvotes · 45.9K views
    atCodecovCodecov
    Visual Studio Code
    Vue.js
    CoffeeScript
    JavaScript
    TypeScript

    We chose TypeScript at Codecov when undergoing a recent rewrite of a legacy front end. Our previous front end was a mishmash of vanilla JavaScript and CoffeeScript , and was expanded upon haphazardly as the need arose. Without a unifying set of paradigms and patterns, the CoffeeScript and JavaScript setup was proving hard to maintain and expand upon by an engineering team. During a move to Vue.js , we decided to also make the move to TypeScript. Integrating TypeScript and Vue.js is fairly well understood at this point, so the setup wasn't all that difficult, and we felt that the benefits of incorporating TypeScript would outweigh the required time to set it up and get our engineering team up to speed.

    Choosing to add TypeScript has given us one more layer to rely on to help enforce code quality, good standards, and best practices within our engineering organization. One of the biggest benefits for us as an engineering team has been how well our IDEs and editors (e.g., Visual Studio Code ) integrate with and understand TypeScript . This allows developers to catch many more errors at development time instead of relying on run time. The end result is safer (from a type perspective) code and a more efficient coding experience that helps to catch and remove errors with less developer effort.

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    Johnny Bell
    Johnny Bell
    Sr. Software Engineer at StackShare · | 9 upvotes · 99.5K views
    atStackShareStackShare
    Apollo
    GraphQL
    MobX
    JavaScript
    ES6
    React
    jQuery
    #Context
    #Hooks🎣

    We are always building new features and replacing old code at StackShare. Lately we have been building out new features for the frontend, and removing a lot of old jQuery code (sorry jQuery but it's time to go).

    We've mainly been using React, ES6 and JavaScript on the frontend to build out the components, and we've been slowly removing some legacy MobX and using GraphQL and Apollo for our state management, if we need to control state further than GraphQL and Apollo allows us to we use just plain React with #context , or the new fancy React #hooks🎣 .

    As we've moved towards the above tech, its really made smashing out new features and updating legacy code super fast, and really fun!

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    Hampton Catlin
    Hampton Catlin
    VP of Engineering at Rent The Runway · | 9 upvotes · 8.5K views
    atRent the RunwayRent the Runway
    React
    TypeScript
    ES6
    JavaScript

    We use JavaScript because it's the standard for web development, especially with browser execution. And, over the years, some smart work by the W3C has taken Javascript from the most-hated-language to the okay-I-can-make-that-good. No small feat!

    Obviously, using ES6 and TypeScript is what makes it decent in browser contexts. Throw in a bit of React and now we're cooking with gas!

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    Interest over time
    Reviews of Groovy and JavaScript
    Review ofJavaScriptJavaScript

    excellent!!

    How developers use Groovy and JavaScript
    Avatar of Andrew Faulkner
    Andrew Faulkner uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Almost the entire app was written in Javascript, with JSON-based configuration and data storage. The following components were written and/or configured with Javascript:

    • Most server-side scripts, all unit tests, all build tools, etc. were driven by NodeJS.
    • ExpressJS served as the 'backend' server framework.
    • MongoDB (which stores essential JSON) was the main database.
    • MongooseJS was used as the main ORM for communicating with the database, with KnexJS used for certain edge cases.
    • MochaJS, ChaiJS, and ExpectJS were used for unit testing.
    • Frontend builds were done with Gulp and Webpack.
    • Package management was done primarily with npm - with a few exceptions that required the use of Bower (also configured with JSON).
    • "Templating" was done with Javascript dialect JSX.
    • The frontend was build primarily with ReactJS (as the View) and Redux (as the Controller / Store / frontend model).
    • Configuration was done with json files.

    The only notable exceptions were the use of SCSS (augmented by Compass) for styling, Bash for a few basic 'system chores' and CLI utilities required for development of the app (most notably git and heroku's CLI interface), and a bit of custom SQL for locations where the ORM extractions leaked (the app is DB-agnostic, but a bit of SQL was required to fill gaps in the ORMs when interfacing with Postgres).

    Avatar of OutSystems
    OutSystems uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    Read more on how to extend the OutSystems UI with Javascript here.

    OutSystems provides a very simple to use AJAX mechanism. However, developers can also use JavaScript extensively to customize how users interact with their applications, to create client side custom validations and dynamic behaviors, or even to create custom, very specific, AJAX interactions. For example, each application can have an application-wide defined JavaScript file or set of files included in resources. Page-specific JavaScript can also be defined.

    Avatar of Gorka Llona
    Gorka Llona uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    This GNU/GPL licensed Javascript library allows you to draw complex organizational charts that can't be drawn using Google's tool or equivalents. Orgchart structures are specified with JSON and can be generated on-the-fly by server-side scripts and databases. Events can be attached to clicks over the boxes. Multiple options can be defined; look at the repo for examples. This 1300-code-lines software component with contributors from 8 countries (and others for which I have to integrate their works) appears in the first page of Google Search results when searching for "Javascript Organizational Chart Library".

    Avatar of Cloudcraft
    Cloudcraft uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    JavaScript gets a bad rep, quite undeservedly so in my opinion. Today, JS is closer to functional languages than to the traditional-OO languages, and when used as such provides a great development experience. The pace of development is just picking up with transpilers like Babel making future advanced language features available to the masses today. At Cloudcraft.co, we write 100% of both the front-end (with React) and the backend (with Node.js) in Javascript, using the latest ES6 and even some ES7 features. This is not your grandfather's Javascript!

    Avatar of MOKA Analytics
    MOKA Analytics uses JavaScriptJavaScript

    The application front-end is written in JavaScript (ES6). We originally selected it over TypeScript because many library typings at the time were still flaky and the transpilation time was slow.

    We are now re-considering TypeScript because 1) the tooling has improved significantly, and 2) and the root cause of the majority of our front-end bugs are related to typing (despite having PropTypes).

    Avatar of Valdomiro Bilharvas
    Valdomiro Bilharvas uses GroovyGroovy

    Used as language to describe and interpret as tools with jenkinsfile

    Avatar of Sodep
    Sodep uses GroovyGroovy

    NPL solutions and statistical machine learning.

    Avatar of Tongliang Liu
    Tongliang Liu uses GroovyGroovy

    As long as you don't abuse def and Closure

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