Alternatives to Groovy logo

Alternatives to Groovy

Java, Scala, Kotlin, Python, and Gradle are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Groovy.
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What is Groovy and what are its top alternatives?

Groovy builds upon the strengths of Java but has additional power features inspired by languages like Python, Ruby and Smalltalk. It makes modern programming features available to Java developers with almost-zero learning curve.
Groovy is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.
Groovy is an open source tool with 1.5K GitHub stars and 430 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Groovy's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Groovy

  • Java

    Java

    Java is a programming language and computing platform first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. There are lots of applications and websites that will not work unless you have Java installed, and more are created every day. Java is fast, secure, and reliable. From laptops to datacenters, game consoles to scientific supercomputers, cell phones to the Internet, Java is everywhere! ...

  • Scala

    Scala

    Scala is an acronym for “Scalable Language”. This means that Scala grows with you. You can play with it by typing one-line expressions and observing the results. But you can also rely on it for large mission critical systems, as many companies, including Twitter, LinkedIn, or Intel do. To some, Scala feels like a scripting language. Its syntax is concise and low ceremony; its types get out of the way because the compiler can infer them. ...

  • Kotlin

    Kotlin

    Kotlin is a statically typed programming language for the JVM, Android and the browser, 100% interoperable with Java ...

  • Python

    Python

    Python is a general purpose programming language created by Guido Van Rossum. Python is most praised for its elegant syntax and readable code, if you are just beginning your programming career python suits you best. ...

  • Gradle

    Gradle

    Gradle is a build tool with a focus on build automation and support for multi-language development. If you are building, testing, publishing, and deploying software on any platform, Gradle offers a flexible model that can support the entire development lifecycle from compiling and packaging code to publishing web sites. ...

  • Grails

    Grails

    Grails is a framework used to build web applications with the Groovy programming language. The core framework is very extensible and there are numerous plugins available that provide easy integration of add-on features. ...

  • PHP

    PHP

    Fast, flexible and pragmatic, PHP powers everything from your blog to the most popular websites in the world. ...

  • JavaScript

    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

Groovy alternatives & related posts

Java logo

Java

80.1K
59.4K
3.5K
A concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, language specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible
80.1K
59.4K
+ 1
3.5K
PROS OF JAVA
  • 576
    Great libraries
  • 436
    Widely used
  • 396
    Excellent tooling
  • 380
    Huge amount of documentation available
  • 329
    Large pool of developers available
  • 198
    Open source
  • 194
    Excellent performance
  • 150
    Great development
  • 144
    Used for android
  • 143
    Vast array of 3rd party libraries
  • 54
    Compiled Language
  • 46
    Used for Web
  • 43
    Managed memory
  • 42
    Native threads
  • 41
    High Performance
  • 36
    Statically typed
  • 32
    Easy to read
  • 30
    Great Community
  • 26
    Reliable platform
  • 23
    JVM compatibility
  • 23
    Sturdy garbage collection
  • 19
    Cross Platform Enterprise Integration
  • 18
    Universal platform
  • 16
    Good amount of APIs
  • 16
    Great Support
  • 11
    Lots of boilerplate
  • 10
    Backward compatible
  • 10
    Great ecosystem
  • 9
    Everywhere
  • 7
    Excellent SDK - JDK
  • 6
    Mature language thus stable systems
  • 5
    Cross-platform
  • 5
    Portability
  • 5
    Better than Ruby
  • 5
    Static typing
  • 5
    It's Java
  • 5
    Clojure
  • 4
    Vast Collections Library
  • 4
    Long term language
  • 4
    Old tech
  • 3
    Best martial for design
  • 3
    Great Structure
  • 3
    Most developers favorite
  • 3
    Stable platform, which many new languages depend on
  • 3
    Used for Android development
  • 2
    Testable
  • 1
    Javadoc
CONS OF JAVA
  • 29
    Verbosity
  • 24
    NullpointerException
  • 15
    Overcomplexity is praised in community culture
  • 14
    Nightmare to Write
  • 10
    Boiler plate code
  • 8
    Classpath hell prior to Java 9
  • 6
    No REPL
  • 4
    No property
  • 2
    Code are too long
  • 2
    There is not optional parameter
  • 2
    Floating-point errors
  • 1
    Terrbible compared to Python/Batch Perormence
  • 1
    Java's too statically, stronglly, and strictly typed
  • 1
    Non-intuitive generic implementation
  • 1
    Returning Wildcard Types

related Java posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 38 upvotes · 3.7M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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Kamil Kowalski
Lead Architect at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 934.6K views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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Scala logo

Scala

6.8K
5.3K
1.5K
A pure-bred object-oriented language that runs on the JVM
6.8K
5.3K
+ 1
1.5K
PROS OF SCALA
  • 187
    Static typing
  • 178
    Pattern-matching
  • 177
    Jvm
  • 170
    Scala is fun
  • 137
    Types
  • 93
    Concurrency
  • 88
    Actor library
  • 85
    Solve functional problems
  • 83
    Open source
  • 80
    Solve concurrency in a safer way
  • 42
    Functional
  • 22
    Generics
  • 22
    Fast
  • 17
    It makes me a better engineer
  • 15
    Syntactic sugar
  • 12
    Scalable
  • 10
    Type safety
  • 10
    First-class functions
  • 9
    Interactive REPL
  • 8
    Expressive
  • 7
    SBT
  • 6
    Implicit parameters
  • 6
    Case classes
  • 4
    Rapid and Safe Development using Functional Programming
  • 4
    Object-oriented
  • 4
    JVM, OOP and Functional programming, and static typing
  • 4
    Used by Twitter
  • 3
    Functional Proframming
  • 2
    Beautiful Code
  • 2
    Safety
  • 2
    Spark
  • 2
    Growing Community
  • 1
    DSL
  • 1
    Rich Static Types System and great Concurrency support
  • 1
    Naturally enforce high code quality
  • 1
    Mill build tool
  • 1
    Akka Streams
  • 1
    Akka
  • 1
    Reactive Streams
  • 1
    Easy embedded DSLs
  • 0
    Freedom to choose the right tools for a job
CONS OF SCALA
  • 10
    Slow compilation time
  • 6
    Multiple ropes and styles to hang your self
  • 3
    Too few developers available
  • 3
    Complicated subtyping
  • 1
    My coworkers using scala are racist against other stuff

related Scala posts

Shared insights
on
Java
Scala
Apache Spark

I am new to Apache Spark and Scala both. I am basically a Java developer and have around 10 years of experience in Java.

I wish to work on some Machine learning or AI tech stacks. Please assist me in the tech stack and help make a clear Road Map. Any feedback is welcome.

Technologies apart from Scala and Spark are also welcome. Please note that the tools should be relevant to Machine Learning or Artificial Intelligence.

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Marc Bollinger
Infra & Data Eng Manager at Thumbtack · | 5 upvotes · 408.2K views

Lumosity is home to the world's largest cognitive training database, a responsibility we take seriously. For most of the company's history, our analysis of user behavior and training data has been powered by an event stream--first a simple Node.js pub/sub app, then a heavyweight Ruby app with stronger durability. Both supported decent throughput and latency, but they lacked some major features supported by existing open-source alternatives: replaying existing messages (also lacking in most message queue-based solutions), scaling out many different readers for the same stream, the ability to leverage existing solutions for reading and writing, and possibly most importantly: the ability to hire someone externally who already had expertise.

We ultimately migrated to Kafka in early- to mid-2016, citing both industry trends in companies we'd talked to with similar durability and throughput needs, the extremely strong documentation and community. We pored over Kyle Kingsbury's Jepsen post (https://aphyr.com/posts/293-jepsen-Kafka), as well as Jay Kreps' follow-up (http://blog.empathybox.com/post/62279088548/a-few-notes-on-kafka-and-jepsen), talked at length with Confluent folks and community members, and still wound up running parallel systems for quite a long time, but ultimately, we've been very, very happy. Understanding the internals and proper levers takes some commitment, but it's taken very little maintenance once configured. Since then, the Confluent Platform community has grown and grown; we've gone from doing most development using custom Scala consumers and producers to being 60/40 Kafka Streams/Connects.

We originally looked into Storm / Heron , and we'd moved on from Redis pub/sub. Heron looks great, but we already had a programming model across services that was more akin to consuming a message consumers than required a topology of bolts, etc. Heron also had just come out while we were starting to migrate things, and the community momentum and direction of Kafka felt more substantial than the older Storm. If we were to start the process over again today, we might check out Pulsar , although the ecosystem is much younger.

To find out more, read our 2017 engineering blog post about the migration!

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Kotlin logo

Kotlin

6.6K
5.7K
494
Statically typed Programming Language targeting JVM and JavaScript
6.6K
5.7K
+ 1
494
PROS OF KOTLIN
  • 62
    Interoperable with Java
  • 47
    Functional Programming support
  • 42
    Null Safety
  • 40
    Backed by JetBrains
  • 38
    Official Android support
  • 29
    Concise
  • 28
    Modern Multiplatform Applications
  • 24
    Expressive Syntax
  • 21
    Coroutines
  • 21
    Target to JVM
  • 20
    Open Source
  • 15
    Practical elegance
  • 13
    Statically Typed
  • 12
    Type Inference
  • 12
    Android support
  • 9
    Better Java
  • 8
    Pragmatic
  • 8
    Powerful as Scala, simple as Python, plus coroutines <3
  • 8
    Readable code
  • 6
    Expressive DSLs
  • 6
    Better language for android
  • 6
    Lambda
  • 5
    Target to JavaScript
  • 4
    Less boilerplate code
  • 3
    Fast Programming language
  • 3
    Used for Android
  • 2
    Functional Programming Language
  • 1
    Less code
  • 1
    Latest version of Java
CONS OF KOTLIN
  • 5
    Java interop makes users write Java in Kotlin
  • 4
    Frequent use of {} keys
  • 2
    Hard to make teams adopt the Kotlin style
  • 2
    Nonullpointer Exception
  • 1
    Friendly community
  • 1
    No boiler plate code

related Kotlin posts

Shivam Bhargava
AVP - Business at VAYUZ Technologies Pvt. Ltd. · | 22 upvotes · 191.4K views

Hi Community! Trust everyone is keeping safe. I am exploring the idea of building a #Neobank (App) with end-to-end banking capabilities. In the process of exploring this space, I have come across multiple Apps (N26, Revolut, Monese, etc) and explored their stacks in detail. The confusion remains to be the Backend Tech to be used?

What would you go with considering all of the languages such as Node.js Java Rails Python are suggested by some person or the other. As a general trend, I have noticed the usage of Node with React on the front or Node with a combination of Kotlin and Swift. Please suggest what would be the right approach!

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Jakub Olan
Node.js Software Engineer · | 17 upvotes · 193.8K views

In our company we have think a lot about languages that we're willing to use, there we have considering Java, Python and C++ . All of there languages are old and well developed at fact but that's not ideology of araclx. We've choose a edge technologies such as Node.js , Rust , Kotlin and Go as our programming languages which is some kind of fun. Node.js is one of biggest trends of 2019, same for Go. We want to grow in our company with growth of languages we have choose, and probably when we would choose Java that would be almost impossible because larger languages move on today's market slower, and cannot have big changes.

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Python logo

Python

130.1K
105.2K
6.5K
A clear and powerful object-oriented programming language, comparable to Perl, Ruby, Scheme, or Java.
130.1K
105.2K
+ 1
6.5K
PROS OF PYTHON
  • 1.1K
    Great libraries
  • 927
    Readable code
  • 817
    Beautiful code
  • 768
    Rapid development
  • 671
    Large community
  • 418
    Open source
  • 379
    Elegant
  • 268
    Great community
  • 261
    Object oriented
  • 209
    Dynamic typing
  • 70
    Great standard library
  • 52
    Very fast
  • 48
    Functional programming
  • 35
    Scientific computing
  • 33
    Easy to learn
  • 30
    Great documentation
  • 25
    Matlab alternative
  • 23
    Productivity
  • 22
    Easy to read
  • 19
    Simple is better than complex
  • 17
    It's the way I think
  • 17
    Imperative
  • 15
    Very programmer and non-programmer friendly
  • 14
    Powerful
  • 14
    Free
  • 13
    Fast and simple
  • 13
    Powerfull language
  • 12
    Scripting
  • 9
    Machine learning support
  • 9
    Explicit is better than implicit
  • 8
    Unlimited power
  • 8
    Ease of development
  • 7
    Import antigravity
  • 7
    Clear and easy and powerfull
  • 6
    It's lean and fun to code
  • 6
    Print "life is short, use python"
  • 5
    Flat is better than nested
  • 5
    Fast coding and good for competitions
  • 5
    There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious
  • 5
    Python has great libraries for data processing
  • 5
    High Documented language
  • 5
    I love snakes
  • 5
    Although practicality beats purity
  • 5
    Great for tooling
  • 4
    Readability counts
  • 3
    CG industry needs
  • 3
    Beautiful is better than ugly
  • 3
    Multiple Inheritence
  • 3
    Complex is better than complicated
  • 3
    Great for analytics
  • 3
    Socially engaged community
  • 3
    Rapid Prototyping
  • 3
    Lists, tuples, dictionaries
  • 3
    Plotting
  • 2
    Generators
  • 2
    Simple and easy to learn
  • 2
    Import this
  • 2
    No cruft
  • 2
    Easy to learn and use
  • 2
    List comprehensions
  • 2
    Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules
  • 2
    Now is better than never
  • 2
    If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad id
  • 2
    If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a g
  • 1
    Many types of collections
  • 1
    Better outcome
  • 1
    Batteries included
  • 1
    Ys
  • 1
    Good
  • 1
    Pip install everything
  • 1
    Easy to setup and run smooth
  • 1
    Because of Netflix
  • 1
    Flexible and easy
  • 1
    Web scraping
  • 1
    Should START with this but not STICK with This
  • 1
    Powerful language for AI
  • 1
    It is Very easy , simple and will you be love programmi
  • 1
    Only one way to do it
  • 1
    A-to-Z
  • 0
    Pro
  • 0
    Powerful
CONS OF PYTHON
  • 50
    Still divided between python 2 and python 3
  • 27
    Performance impact
  • 26
    Poor syntax for anonymous functions
  • 19
    Package management is a mess
  • 19
    GIL
  • 13
    Too imperative-oriented
  • 12
    Hard to understand
  • 11
    Dynamic typing
  • 9
    Very slow
  • 8
    Not everything is expression
  • 7
    Explicit self parameter in methods
  • 7
    Indentations matter a lot
  • 6
    Poor DSL capabilities
  • 6
    No anonymous functions
  • 6
    Requires C functions for dynamic modules
  • 5
    Threading
  • 5
    The "lisp style" whitespaces
  • 5
    Hard to obfuscate
  • 4
    Fake object-oriented programming
  • 4
    Incredibly slow
  • 4
    Lack of Syntax Sugar leads to "the pyramid of doom"
  • 4
    The benevolent-dictator-for-life quit
  • 3
    Official documentation is unclear.
  • 3
    Circular import
  • 3
    Not suitable for autocomplete
  • 1
    Training wheels (forced indentation)
  • 1
    Meta classes

related Python posts

Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 38 upvotes · 3.7M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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Nick Parsons
Director of Developer Marketing at Stream · | 35 upvotes · 1.3M views

Winds 2.0 is an open source Podcast/RSS reader developed by Stream with a core goal to enable a wide range of developers to contribute.

We chose JavaScript because nearly every developer knows or can, at the very least, read JavaScript. With ES6 and Node.js v10.x.x, it’s become a very capable language. Async/Await is powerful and easy to use (Async/Await vs Promises). Babel allows us to experiment with next-generation JavaScript (features that are not in the official JavaScript spec yet). Yarn allows us to consistently install packages quickly (and is filled with tons of new tricks)

We’re using JavaScript for everything – both front and backend. Most of our team is experienced with Go and Python, so Node was not an obvious choice for this app.

Sure... there will be haters who refuse to acknowledge that there is anything remotely positive about JavaScript (there are even rants on Hacker News about Node.js); however, without writing completely in JavaScript, we would not have seen the results we did.

#FrameworksFullStack #Languages

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Gradle logo

Gradle

7.8K
5.6K
253
A powerful build system for the JVM
7.8K
5.6K
+ 1
253
PROS OF GRADLE
  • 109
    Flexibility
  • 52
    Easy to use
  • 47
    Groovy dsl
  • 22
    Slow build time
  • 10
    Crazy memory leaks
  • 8
    Fast incremental builds
  • 4
    Kotlin DSL
  • 1
    Windows Support
CONS OF GRADLE
  • 7
    Inactionnable documentation
  • 6
    It is just the mess of Ant++
  • 4
    Hard to decide: ten or more ways to achieve one goal
  • 2
    Bad Eclipse tooling
  • 2
    Dependency on groovy

related Gradle posts

Shared insights
on
Apache Maven
Gradle
at

We use Apache Maven because it is a standard. Gradle is very good alternative, but Gradle doesn't provide any advantage for our project. Gradle is slower (without running daemon), need more resources and a learning curve is quite big. Our project can not use a great flexibility of Gradle. On the other hand, Maven is well-know tool integrated in many IDEs, Dockers and so on.

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Application & Data

Java JavaScript Node.js nginx Ubuntu MongoDB Amazon EC2 Redis Amazon S3 AWS Lambda RabbitMQ Kafka MySQL Spring Boot Dropwizard Vue.js Flutter

Utilities

Google Analytics Elasticsearch Amazon Route 53

DevOps

GitHub Docker Webpack CircleCI Jenkins Travis CI Gradle Apache Maven

Cooperation Tools

Jira notion.so Trello

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Grails logo

Grails

333
300
328
An Open Source, full stack, web application framework for the JVM
333
300
+ 1
328
PROS OF GRAILS
  • 55
    Groovy
  • 39
    Jvm
  • 38
    Rapid development
  • 37
    Gorm
  • 29
    Web framework
  • 24
    Open source
  • 21
    Plugins
  • 17
    Extensible
  • 16
    Easy
  • 14
    Dynamic
  • 6
    Clean architecture (Dependency Injection)
  • 6
    Gradle
  • 5
    Clear what everything does, lots of options
  • 4
    RAD
  • 4
    Great documentation
  • 4
    Agile
  • 3
    Android
  • 3
    Spring
  • 2
    Easy setup
  • 1
    Java web apps with steroid
CONS OF GRAILS
  • 3
    Frequent breaking changes
  • 2
    Undocumented features

related Grails posts

Alex A

Some may wonder why did we choose Grails ? Really good question :) We spent quite some time to evaluate what framework to go with and the battle was between Play Scala and Grails ( Groovy ). We have enough experience with both and, to be honest, I absolutely in love with Scala; however, the tipping point for us was the potential speed of development. Grails allows much faster development pace than Play , and as of right now this is the most important parameter. We might convert later though. Also, worth mentioning, by default Grails comes with Gradle as a build tool, so why change?

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PHP logo

PHP

104K
49.4K
4.5K
A popular general-purpose scripting language that is especially suited to web development
104K
49.4K
+ 1
4.5K
PROS OF PHP
  • 941
    Large community
  • 804
    Open source
  • 757
    Easy deployment
  • 481
    Great frameworks
  • 384
    The best glue on the web
  • 232
    Continual improvements
  • 180
    Good old web
  • 141
    Web foundation
  • 131
    Community packages
  • 123
    Tool support
  • 32
    Used by wordpress
  • 30
    Excellent documentation
  • 25
    Used by Facebook
  • 23
    Because of Symfony
  • 18
    Dynamic Language
  • 14
    Awesome Language and easy to implement
  • 13
    Very powerful web language
  • 13
    Cheap hosting
  • 13
    Fast development
  • 10
    Composer
  • 9
    Because of Laravel
  • 9
    Easy to learn
  • 9
    Flexibility, syntax, extensibility
  • 7
    Worst popularity quality ratio
  • 7
    Easiest deployment
  • 7
    Readable Code
  • 7
    Fastestest Time to Version 1.0 Deployments
  • 7
    Short development lead times
  • 6
    Fast
  • 6
    Most of the web uses it
  • 6
    Faster then ever
  • 5
    Open source and large community
  • 4
    I have no choice :(
  • 4
    Easy to learn, a big community, lot of frameworks
  • 4
    Cheap to own
  • 4
    Simple, flexible yet Scalable
  • 4
    Easy to use and learn
  • 3
    Great developer experience
  • 3
    Large community, easy setup, easy deployment, framework
  • 3
    Is like one zip of air
  • 3
    Open source and great framework
  • 3
    Has the best ecommerce(Magento,Prestashop,Opencart,etc)
  • 2
    FFI
  • 2
    Walk away
  • 2
    Safe the planet
  • 2
    Hard not to use
  • 2
    Fault tolerance
  • 2
    Interpreted at the run time
  • 2
    Great flexibility. From fast prototyping to large apps
  • 2
    Used by STOMT
CONS OF PHP
  • 19
    So easy to learn, good practices are hard to find
  • 16
    Inconsistent API
  • 8
    Fragmented community
  • 5
    Not secure
  • 2
    No routing system
  • 1
    Hard to debug
  • 1
    Old

related PHP posts

Nick Rockwell
SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 42 upvotes · 1.5M views

When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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Simon Reymann
Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 24 upvotes · 1.7M views

Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

  • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
  • npm as package manager
  • NestJS as Node.js framework
  • TypeScript as programming language
  • ExpressJS as web server
  • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
  • Postman as a tool for API development
  • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
  • JSON Web Token for access token management

The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

  • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
  • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
  • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
  • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
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JavaScript

189K
147.2K
7.7K
Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
189K
147.2K
+ 1
7.7K
PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 1.6K
    Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 1.5K
    It's everywhere
  • 1.1K
    Lots of great frameworks
  • 884
    Fast
  • 733
    Light weight
  • 411
    Flexible
  • 376
    You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
  • 279
    Non-blocking i/o
  • 229
    Ubiquitousness
  • 184
    Expressive
  • 48
    Extended functionality to web pages
  • 42
    Relatively easy language
  • 39
    Executed on the client side
  • 24
    Relatively fast to the end user
  • 20
    Pure Javascript
  • 15
    Functional programming
  • 8
    Async
  • 6
    JavaScript is the New PHP
  • 6
    Because I love functions
  • 6
    Full-stack
  • 6
    Setup is easy
  • 5
    Expansive community
  • 5
    Its everywhere
  • 5
    Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
  • 5
    Future Language of The Web
  • 5
    Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
  • 4
    Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
  • 4
    Supports lambdas and closures
  • 4
    Evolution of C
  • 4
    For the good parts
  • 4
    Easy to hire developers
  • 4
    Everyone use it
  • 4
    Love-hate relationship
  • 3
    Everywhere
  • 3
    Promise relationship
  • 3
    Agile, packages simple to use
  • 3
    What to add
  • 3
    Easy to make something
  • 3
    Nice
  • 3
    Only Programming language on browser
  • 3
    Because it is so simple and lightweight
  • 3
    Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
  • 3
    Function expressions are useful for callbacks
  • 3
    Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
  • 3
    No need to use PHP
  • 3
    Versitile
  • 3
    Most Popular Language in the World
  • 3
    Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Clojurescript
  • 3
    Stockholm Syndrome
  • 3
    It let's me use Babel & Typescript
  • 3
    Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
  • 3
    Its fun and fast
  • 3
    1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 3
    Powerful
  • 3
    Scope manipulation
  • 3
    Hard not to use
  • 3
    Client processing
  • 3
    It's fun
  • 1
    Acoperișul 0757604335
  • 1
    JavaScript j.s
CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 21
    A constant moving target, too much churn
  • 20
    Horribly inconsistent
  • 14
    Javascript is the New PHP
  • 8
    No ability to monitor memory utilitization
  • 6
    Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
  • 5
    Can be ugly
  • 4
    Thinks strange results are better than errors
  • 2
    No GitHub
  • 1
    Slow

related JavaScript posts

Zach Holman

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 38 upvotes · 3.7M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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