Alternatives to RancherOS logo

Alternatives to RancherOS

CoreOS, Ubuntu, Kubernetes, Docker Compose, and CentOS are the most popular alternatives and competitors to RancherOS.
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What is RancherOS and what are its top alternatives?

It makes it simple to run containers at scale in development, test and production. By containerizing system services and leveraging Docker for management, the operating system provides a very reliable and easy to manage containers.
RancherOS is a tool in the Operating Systems category of a tech stack.
RancherOS is an open source tool with 5.7K GitHub stars and 579 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to RancherOS's open source repository on GitHub

RancherOS alternatives & related posts

CoreOS logo

CoreOS

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Linux for Massive Server Deployments
CoreOS logo
CoreOS
VS
RancherOS logo
RancherOS
Ubuntu logo

Ubuntu

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The leading OS for PC, tablet, phone and cloud
Ubuntu logo
Ubuntu
VS
RancherOS logo
RancherOS

related Ubuntu posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 9 upvotes · 37.3K views
atZulipZulip
Debian
Debian
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Fedora
Fedora

We use Debian and its derivative Ubuntu because the apt ecosystem and toolchain for Debian packages is far superior to the yum-based system used by Fedora and RHEL. This is large part due to a huge amount of investment into tools like debhelper/dh over the years by the Debian community. I haven't dealt with RPM in the last couple years, but every experience I've had with RPM is that the RPM tools are slower, have less useful options, and it's more work to package software for them (and one makes more compromises in doing so).

I think everyone has seen the better experience using Ubuntu in the shift of prevalence from RHEL to Ubuntu in what most new companies are deploying on their servers, and I expect that trend to continue as long as Red Hat is using the RPM system (and I don't really see them as having a path to migrate).

The experience with Ubuntu and Debian stable releases is pretty similar: A solid release every 2 years that's supported for a few years. (While Ubuntu in theory releases every 6 months, their non-LTS releases are effectively betas: They're often unstable, only have 9 months of support, etc. I wouldn't recommend them to anyone not actively participating in Ubuntu the development community). Ubuntu has better integration of non-free drivers, which may be important if you have hardware that requires them. But it's also the case that most bugs I experience when using Ubuntu are Ubuntu-specific issues, especially on servers (in part because Ubuntu has a bunch of "cloud management" stuff pre-installed that is definitely a regression if you're not using Canonical's cloud management products).

See more
Marcel Kornegoor
Marcel Kornegoor
CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 198.6K views
atAT ComputingAT Computing
Linux
Linux
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
CentOS
CentOS
Debian
Debian
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Fedora
Fedora
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Jenkins
Jenkins
VirtualBox
VirtualBox
GitHub
GitHub
Docker
Docker
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Ansible
Ansible
Puppet Labs
Puppet Labs
Chef
Chef
Python
Python
#ATComputing

Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

See more

related Kubernetes posts

Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer · | 29 upvotes · 500.6K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

See more
Conor Myhrvold
Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 20 upvotes · 1M views
atUber TechnologiesUber Technologies
Jaeger
Jaeger
Python
Python
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
Go
Go
C++
C++
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
JavaScript
JavaScript
OpenShift
OpenShift
C#
C#
Apache Spark
Apache Spark

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

See more

related Docker Compose posts

Docker
Docker
Docker Compose
Docker Compose
Jenkins
Jenkins
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
FeathersJS
FeathersJS
Node.js
Node.js
ExpressJS
ExpressJS
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
React
React
Redux
Redux
Semantic UI React
Semantic UI React
AVA
AVA
ESLint
ESLint
nginx
nginx
GitHub
GitHub
#Containerized
#Containers
#Backend
#Stack
#Frontend

Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

See more
Zach Holman
Zach Holman
Home Assistant
Home Assistant
Docker
Docker
Docker Compose
Docker Compose

I've been recently getting really into home automation- you know, making my house Smart™, which basically means half the time my lights don't turn on and the other half of the time apparently my kitchen faucet needs a static IP address.

But it's been a blast! It's a fun way to write code for yourself, outside of work, to have an impact in the real world. It's a nice way of falling in love with a different side of programming again.

I've used Apple's HomeKit for awhile, since we're pretty all-in in Apple devices at home, but the rough edges have been grating at me more and more. HomeKit is so opaque- you can't see what's wrong, why a device is unresponsive, and most importantly: the compatibility isn't there. HomeKit has a limited selection of — more expensive — accessories, and as you go beyond just simple LED lights, you want a bit more power. Also, we're programmers, dammit, gimme all the things.

Anyway, I've switched to Home Assistant the last few months, and I'm kicking myself I didn't make the switch earlier. As a programmer, it's great: you get the most capability than pretty much any other smart home platform (integrations have been written for most devices and technologies out there today), it's easier to debug, and when you want to go bigger than just simple lights on/off, HA has some really powerful stuff behind it.

I use Home Assistant in conjunction with Docker and Docker Compose; since the config is extracted out, upgrades are usually as easy as a pull of the latest version. I've just started digging into writing integrations for a lesser-used device that I have at home, and HA makes it pretty straightforward to just magically add it to the home network.

It plays well with others, too- we require a VPN connection in to the home network to access our Home Assistant install, and HA has a few tricks to help with that (ignoring the VPN route if you're on a local network, etc). Nice client support for iOS and Android, too.

Anyway, big fan of Home Assistant if you want to go beyond simple home automations and setup. Wish I would have done it a lot earlier. Also, big fan of jumping into all this if you have the time and interest to do so- it's been tickling a different part of my code brain than I've had access to in awhile, and that's been fun in and of itself.

See more
CentOS logo

CentOS

4.9K
2.2K
11
4.9K
2.2K
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The Community ENTerprise Operating System
CentOS logo
CentOS
VS
RancherOS logo
RancherOS

related CentOS posts

Marcel Kornegoor
Marcel Kornegoor
CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 198.6K views
atAT ComputingAT Computing
Linux
Linux
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
CentOS
CentOS
Debian
Debian
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Fedora
Fedora
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Jenkins
Jenkins
VirtualBox
VirtualBox
GitHub
GitHub
Docker
Docker
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Ansible
Ansible
Puppet Labs
Puppet Labs
Chef
Chef
Python
Python
#ATComputing

Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

See more
Paul Whittemore
Paul Whittemore
Developer and Owner at Appurist Software · | 1 upvotes · 13.8K views
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
WebStorm
WebStorm
CentOS
CentOS
Visual Studio
Visual Studio
Windows
Windows

Visual Studio Code on Centos and/or Windows is my go-to IDE for all web development (even though I have a license for WebStorm ... for now).

Visual Studio on Windows for any C#/.NET development work.

See more
Debian logo

Debian

4.6K
2.5K
104
4.6K
2.5K
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The Universal Operating System
Debian logo
Debian
VS
RancherOS logo
RancherOS

related Debian posts

Labinator Team
Labinator Team
at Labinator · | 13 upvotes · 127.7K views
atLabinatorLabinator
HTML5
HTML5
CSS 3
CSS 3
Sass
Sass
Vanilla.JS
Vanilla.JS
PHP
PHP
WordPress
WordPress
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Manjaro
Manjaro
Debian
Debian

At labinator.com, we use HTML5, CSS 3, Sass, Vanilla.JS and PHP when building our premium WordPress themes and plugins. When writing our codes, we use Sublime Text and Visual Studio Code depending on the project. We run Manjaro and Debian operating systems in our office. Manjaro is a great desktop operating system for all range of tasks while Debian is a solid choice for servers.

WordPress became a very popular choice when it comes to content management systems and building websites. It is easy to learn and has a great community behind it. The high number of plugins as well that are available for WordPress allows any user to customize it depending on his/her needs.

For development, HTML5 with Sass is our go-to choice when building our themes.

Main Advantages Of Sass:

  • It's CSS syntax friendly
  • It offers variables
  • It uses a nested syntax
  • It includes mixins
  • Great community and online support.
  • Great documentation that is easy to read and follow.

As for PHP, we always thrive to use PHP 7.3+. After the introduction of PHP 7, the WordPress development process became more stable and reliable than before. If you a developer considering PHP 7.3+ for your project, it would be good to note the following benefits.

The Benefits Of Using PHP:

  • Open Source.
  • Highly Extendible.
  • Easy to learn and read.
  • Platform independent.
  • Compatible with APACHE.
  • Low development and maintenance cost.
  • Great community and support.
  • Detailed documentation that has everything you need!

Why PHP 7.3+?

  • Flexible Heredoc & Nowdoc Syntaxes - Two key methods for defining strings within PHP. They also became easier to read and more reliable.
  • A good boost in performance speed which is extremely important when it comes to WordPress development.
See more
Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 9 upvotes · 37.3K views
atZulipZulip
Debian
Debian
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Fedora
Fedora

We use Debian and its derivative Ubuntu because the apt ecosystem and toolchain for Debian packages is far superior to the yum-based system used by Fedora and RHEL. This is large part due to a huge amount of investment into tools like debhelper/dh over the years by the Debian community. I haven't dealt with RPM in the last couple years, but every experience I've had with RPM is that the RPM tools are slower, have less useful options, and it's more work to package software for them (and one makes more compromises in doing so).

I think everyone has seen the better experience using Ubuntu in the shift of prevalence from RHEL to Ubuntu in what most new companies are deploying on their servers, and I expect that trend to continue as long as Red Hat is using the RPM system (and I don't really see them as having a path to migrate).

The experience with Ubuntu and Debian stable releases is pretty similar: A solid release every 2 years that's supported for a few years. (While Ubuntu in theory releases every 6 months, their non-LTS releases are effectively betas: They're often unstable, only have 9 months of support, etc. I wouldn't recommend them to anyone not actively participating in Ubuntu the development community). Ubuntu has better integration of non-free drivers, which may be important if you have hardware that requires them. But it's also the case that most bugs I experience when using Ubuntu are Ubuntu-specific issues, especially on servers (in part because Ubuntu has a bunch of "cloud management" stuff pre-installed that is definitely a regression if you're not using Canonical's cloud management products).

See more
Linux logo

Linux

530
437
6
530
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A family of free and open source software operating systems based on the Linux kernel
Linux logo
Linux
VS
RancherOS logo
RancherOS

related Linux posts

Marcel Kornegoor
Marcel Kornegoor
CTO at AT Computing · | 5 upvotes · 198.6K views
atAT ComputingAT Computing
Linux
Linux
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
CentOS
CentOS
Debian
Debian
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Fedora
Fedora
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Jenkins
Jenkins
VirtualBox
VirtualBox
GitHub
GitHub
Docker
Docker
Kubernetes
Kubernetes
Google Compute Engine
Google Compute Engine
Ansible
Ansible
Puppet Labs
Puppet Labs
Chef
Chef
Python
Python
#ATComputing

Since #ATComputing is a vendor independent Linux and open source specialist, we do not have a favorite Linux distribution. We mainly use Ubuntu , Centos Debian , Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora during our daily work. These are also the distributions we see most often used in our customers environments.

For our #ci/cd training, we use an open source pipeline that is build around Visual Studio Code , Jenkins , VirtualBox , GitHub , Docker Kubernetes and Google Compute Engine.

For #ServerConfigurationAndAutomation, we have embraced and contributed to Ansible mainly because it is not only flexible and powerful, but also straightforward and easier to learn than some other (open source) solutions. On the other hand: we are not affraid of Puppet Labs and Chef either.

Currently, our most popular #programming #Language course is Python . The reason Python is so popular has to do with it's versatility, but also with its low complexity. This helps sysadmins to write scripts or simple programs to make their job less repetitive and automating things more fun. Python is also widely used to communicate with (REST) API's and for data analysis.

See more
Ubuntu
Ubuntu
Linux
Linux
Arch Linux
Arch Linux

I once used Ubuntu as my exclusive Linux distro, but then I decided to switch my primary operating system to Arch Linux.

While more difficult to install, Arch Linux offered more flexibility during the installation process which allowed me to customize my system to fit me perfectly. With Ubuntu, instead of installing everything i did want, I had to remove everything that I didn't need.

See more

related Docker Swarm posts

Yshay Yaacobi
Yshay Yaacobi
Software Engineer · | 29 upvotes · 500.6K views
atSolutoSoluto
Docker Swarm
Docker Swarm
.NET
.NET
F#
F#
C#
C#
JavaScript
JavaScript
TypeScript
TypeScript
Go
Go
Visual Studio Code
Visual Studio Code
Kubernetes
Kubernetes

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

See more