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Slack vs Trello: What are the differences?

Developers describe Slack as "Bring all your communication together in one place". Imagine all your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That’s Slack. All your messages. All your files. And everything from Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, Asana, Trello, GitHub and dozens of other services. All together. On the other hand, Trello is detailed as "Your entire project, in a single glance". Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, Trello tells you what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.

Slack can be classified as a tool in the "Group Chat & Notifications" category, while Trello is grouped under "Project Management".

Some of the features offered by Slack are:

  • Create open channels for the projects, groups and topics that the whole team shares.
  • Search with context
  • Autocomplete makes mentioning your teammates quick and painless.

On the other hand, Trello provides the following key features:

  • Add a checklist to keep on top of all those little to-dos. There’s also a nice, big progress meter, because who doesn’t love a nice, big progress meter?
  • Got a relevant file, image, or document? Attach it right to the card, and you’ll never have to go scrambling through your inbox looking for it later.
  • Attach photos, drawings, sketches, and mockups to quickly illustrate ideas at a glance.

"Easy to integrate with", "Excellent interface on multiple platforms" and "Free" are the key factors why developers consider Slack; whereas "Great for collaboration", "Easy to use" and "Free" are the primary reasons why Trello is favored.

According to the StackShare community, Slack has a broader approval, being mentioned in 4795 company stacks & 3481 developers stacks; compared to Trello, which is listed in 2181 company stacks and 1770 developer stacks.

- No public GitHub repository available -
- No public GitHub repository available -

What is Slack?

Imagine all your team communication in one place, instantly searchable, available wherever you go. That’s Slack. All your messages. All your files. And everything from Twitter, Dropbox, Google Docs, Asana, Trello, GitHub and dozens of other services. All together.

What is Trello?

Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, Trello tells you what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.
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Why do developers choose Slack?
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What are some alternatives to Slack and Trello?
Microsoft Teams
See content and chat history anytime, including team chats with Skype that are visible to the whole team. Private group chats are available for smaller group conversations.
Discord
Discord is a modern free voice & text chat app for groups of gamers. Our resilient Erlang backend running on the cloud has built in DDoS protection with automatic server failover.
Skype
Skype’s text, voice and video make it simple to share experiences with the people that matter to you, wherever they are.
Asana
Asana is the easiest way for teams to track their work. From tasks and projects to conversations and dashboards, Asana enables teams to move work from start to finish--and get results. Available at asana.com and on iOS & Android.
Yammer
Yammer brings the power of social networking to your company. Collaborate securely across departments, geographies, content and business applications.
See all alternatives
Decisions about Slack and Trello
Kirill Shirinkin
Kirill Shirinkin
Cloud and DevOps Consultant at mkdev · | 10 upvotes · 278.6K views
atmkdevmkdev
G Suite
G Suite
GitLab
GitLab
Rollbar
Rollbar
Stripe
Stripe
Mailchimp
Mailchimp
Intercom
Intercom
Basecamp
Basecamp
Slack
Slack
Trello
Trello

As a small startup we are very conscious about picking up the tools we use to run the project. After suffering with a mess of using at the same time Trello , Slack , Telegram and what not, we arrived at a small set of tools that cover all our current needs. For product management, file sharing, team communication etc we chose Basecamp and couldn't be more happy about it. For Customer Support and Sales Intercom works amazingly well. We are using MailChimp for email marketing since over 4 years and it still covers all our needs. Then on payment side combination of Stripe and Octobat helps us to process all the payments and generate compliant invoices. On techie side we use Rollbar and GitLab (for both code and CI). For corporate email we picked G Suite. That all costs us in total around 300$ a month, which is quite okay.

See more
Vishnu KS
Vishnu KS
Software Engineer at Zulip · | 5 upvotes · 13.7K views
atZulipZulip
Slack
Slack
Zulip
Zulip

Zulip has easily the best threading model among all the chat applications and I prefer it over Slack, Mattermost, RocketChat, Hipchat, Discord etc. Each and every conversation is a seperate thread and has a topic. This model makes it extremely easier to catch up and participate in conversations. Once you get used to the threading model of Zulip its hard to tolerate threading model like Slack which is really inefficient and time wasting.

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Radu Cioplea
Radu Cioplea
Jira
Jira
Asana
Asana
Basecamp
Basecamp
Trello
Trello
#Kanban

There are lots of project management tools available nowadays. The choice ended up between Trello and Basecamp. Asana , JIRA and monday.com got a fair review but they didn't make it to the final list for several reasons (either way to complex or some UX issues or just too many options - good in some cases but not a good fit in this case).

Between Basecamp and Trello the battle was between ease of use and price. Basecamp packs a great set of features and if you are ready to move to an all in one solution: chat, file storage, and a PM tool, then @basecanp is by far the right choice. But since all the features are within one package that cannot be customized, moving to Basecamp but only using a part of the tool feels.. well.. not right. On the other hand Trello has the #kanban format that is just too easy to use and the price point for small and midsize team that no one can beat.

At the end, all solutions have a good fit in some cases. A better fit. But I think Trello can do the job in any case - it can fit with any scenario.

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rishig
rishig
Head of Product at Zulip · | 3 upvotes · 20.5K views
atZulipZulip
RocketChat
RocketChat
Mattermost
Mattermost
Slack
Slack

I use Zulip instead of Slack, Mattermost, or RocketChat because of its first class threading. One week after switching to Gmail (in 2004) I realized I was never (willingly) going to use an unthreaded email product again. I had that same experience the first time I saw Zulip.

Zulip is also fully open-source, with a well-maintained (e.g. 90+% test coverage, fully static python), easily extensible code-base. In many companies, your communication platform (chat or email) is the center of the workplace -- no one asks for a chat integration into their calendar, they ask for a calendar integration into their chat. A fully open-source codebase means you can customize Zulip to your needs, and are never at the whim of a corporate maintainer who can't or won't fix simple bugs, or who will charge you tens of thousands of dollars for making minor customizations.

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Slack
Slack
Zulip
Zulip

I use Zulip because I love how it lets me focus on my work, and doesn't need me to be constantly online to be able to participate in conversations that matter to me. Zulip's topics make it super easy to get an overview of all the conversations that happened while I was away, and pick and choose the conversations that I want to catch-up with. Slack 's threads seem like an after-thought and aren't effective for catching-up at all!

I also love the Zulip community, and the care and effort put in by the members to make it a friendly and welcoming community to new developers, and to make the contribution experience pleasant for all the contributors.

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Joshua Dean Küpper
Joshua Dean Küpper
CEO at Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt) · | 1 upvotes · 17.2K views
atScrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)Scrayos UG (haftungsbeschränkt)
Nextcloud
Nextcloud
Wekan
Wekan
Trello
Trello
Google Drive
Google Drive

We use Nextcloud for company-file-management, personal work-documents and for collaborative work (through collabora), organize our #TODOs, that are not covered by the Bugtracker. Existing solutions either were very expensive ( Google Drive ), missed a lot of features ( Trello ) or were pretty much overloaded with features ( Wekan within Sandstorm ).

That made Nextcloud ud our natural fit for our company management and we're convinced of its integrations and flexibility.

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 32.1K views
atDev As ProsDev As Pros
Twist
Twist
Slack
Slack
ESLint
ESLint
JavaScript
JavaScript
RuboCop
RuboCop
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Rails
Rails
Node.js
Node.js

For many(if not all) small and medium size business time and cost matter a lot.

That's why languages, frameworks, tools, and services that are easy to use and provide 0 to productive in less time, it's best.

Maybe Node.js frameworks might provide better features compared to Rails but in terms of MVPs, for us Rails is the leading alternative.

Amazon EC2 might be cheaper and more customizable than Heroku but in the initial terms of a project, you need to complete configurationos and deploy early.

Advanced configurations can be done down the road, when the project is running and making money, not before.

But moving fast isn't the only thing we care about. We also take the job to leave a good codebase from the beginning and because of that we try to follow, as much as we can, style guides in Ruby with RuboCop and in JavaScript with ESLint and StandardJS.

Finally, comunication and keeping a good history of conversations, decisions, and discussions is important so we use a mix of Slack and Twist

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 13 upvotes · 111.2K views
atDev As ProsDev As Pros
Trello
Trello
Slack
Slack
Keen
Keen
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Create React App
Create React App
React
React
Google Maps
Google Maps

For Etom, a side project. We wanted to test an idea for a future and bigger project.

What Etom does is searching places. Right now, it leverages the Google Maps API. For that, we found a React component that makes this integration easy because using Google Maps API is not possible via normal API requests.

You kind of need a map to work as a proxy between the software and Google Maps API.

We hate configuration(coming from Rails world) so also decided to use Create React App because setting up a React app, with all the toys, it's a hard job.

Thanks to all the people behind Create React App it's easier to start any React application.

We also chose a module called Reactstrap which is Bootstrap UI in React components.

An important thing in this side project(and in the bigger project plan) is to measure visitor through out the app. For that we researched and found that Keen was a good choice(very good free tier limits) and also it is very simple to setup and real simple to send data to

Slack and Trello are our defaults tools to comunicate ideas and discuss topics, so, no brainer using them as well for this project.

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Aghmat Abrahams
Aghmat Abrahams
Junior Data Engineer at Impact Radius · | 5 upvotes · 15K views
Slack
Slack
OpsGenie
OpsGenie
GitHub
GitHub
Jira
Jira
Mattermost
Mattermost

Slack is the industry standard for managed instant messaging (IM). A good alternative would be to self (or cloud) host an open source IM such as Mattermost but as always it would be a good idea to do a cost benefit analysis between the solutions.

Some of the main things to consider:

  • Having a good SDK for plugin creation
  • Having good integrations with existing tools ( JIRA , GitHub , OpsGenie , etc.)
  • Cost
  • Maintenance and administration
  • Covers all your businesses use cases
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Mark Nelissen
Mark Nelissen
CTO at Gemsotec bvba · | 5 upvotes · 17.1K views
Mattermost
Mattermost
Skype
Skype
Stride
Stride
HipChat
HipChat
Slack
Slack

I use Slack because it offers the best experience, even on the free tier (which we're still using). As a comparison, I have had in depth experience with HipChat, Stride, Skype, Google Chat (the new service), Google Hangouts (the old service). For self hosted, Mattermost is open source and claims to support most Slack integrations, but I have not extensively investigated this claim.

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Justin Dorfman
Justin Dorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare · | 3 upvotes · 13.7K views
Jira
Jira
Asana
Asana
Google Chrome
Google Chrome
macOS
macOS
Trello
Trello

I use Trello, the macOS app for my personal projects and Google Chrome for work. At work, I have 7-8 active boards for various projects.

At first, I wasn't sure about Trello. The last company I worked at used Asana and I was really used to that. Before then I was using Jira. Now I ❤️Trello. It is amazing. Power-Ups™️ are so awesome!

For personal projects, I have used it for planning a move across town. I'm also using it for my Wedding. I got my fiancè almost loving it too.

See more
Jason Barry
Jason Barry
Cofounder at FeaturePeek · | 6 upvotes · 13.8K views
atFeaturePeekFeaturePeek
Jira
Jira
Trello
Trello
Clubhouse
Clubhouse

We've been really happy with Clubhouse for project organization / task management / kanban board while developing FeaturePeek. The featureset is rich and the UI uncluttered. Clubhouse is different in that it makes some assumptions on how things should be (workflow state, the relationships between stories/epics/milestones, etc). having it be opinionated from the start helps you hit the ground running, while still being editable / extensible for tweaking things to your liking.

The pricing is spot-on too – a flat $10/month for teams of 10 or less. This really made it attractive to us to try out.

If you think Trello is too basic / lightweight but Jira is too full-featured / heavy, you should give Clubhouse a shot – I think you'll be pleasantly surprised.

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Slack
Slack
Spectrum
Spectrum
Discord
Discord
Gitter
Gitter

From a StackShare Community member: “We’re about to start a chat group for our open source project (over 5K stars on GitHub) so we can let our community collaborate more closely. The obvious choice would be Slack (k8s and a ton of major projects use it), but we’ve seen Gitter (webpack uses it) for a lot of open source projects, Discord (Vue.js moved to them), and as of late I’m seeing Spectrum more and more often. Does anyone have experience with these or other alternatives? Is it even worth assessing all these options, or should we just go with Slack? Some things that are important to us: free, all the regular integrations (GitHub, Heroku, etc), mobile & desktop apps, and open source is of course a plus."

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Interest over time
Reviews of Slack and Trello
Review ofSlackSlack

Today the impossible happened, our beloved Slack crashed sending chaos into offices around the globe. “Wow, how am I now going to vote for the flavour of our new office candy???”, I thought. But even though it might not have felt like it, everything else around us was still working: the world was still spinning, South Korea was winning over Germany at the World Cup, and today’s quotas and goals had to be met. In these situations, people most often turn towards traditional messaging tools like messenger, WhatsApp or email and hope for the best — that Slack will be back up soon. However, these temporary remedies are not without their complications: undelivered messages that you thought were read, lost documents, mental breakdowns, wasted time, etc.… In general, for us it creates a problematic gap in our office chat history.

But what if I told you that these crashes could potentially never occur again?

Yes, this is real life, and it’s exactly what mesh technology is about so we are going to explain it. In this scenario, if Slack ran with mesh networks, its users would not have been affected by its current technology’s single point of failure, which in this case was the crash of the server.

Lol okay, how is this possible bc this is real life???

Mesh networks might not sound familiar to everyone so let’s compare it with other well-known networking topologies. Consider a Local Area Network (LAN), where devices are connected to a central access point (imagine it like a star with the central access point in the middle and the devices located at the ends). Be it LAN or wifi, the idea is the same, so when I send a message on Slack, it first arrives at the Slack server (the central access point) and from there it is sent to the recipient.

In mesh networks, devices are directly connected to each other. They form a local network using existing connectivity technologies such as Bluetooth or Wi-Fi as “connectors”. Devices can act as “routers” and forward messages and files to others, enabling the content to hop between them until it reaches a destination. This eliminates the need for a central entity.

Let’s apply this concept to today’s crisis. If slack ran on top of mesh networks, their consumers would still be able to communicate and send files even though they were not connected to the crashed server. Once it was up and running again, all their group conversations which would have taken place during the outrage would be uploaded back to Slack’s server once they were back online.

Honestly, it’s that simple. To Slack, it would not only be convenient for its customers in situations like these (because we would never have Slack crashes), it would also considerably reduce their own infrastructure costs and prevent them from having moments that they might find embarrassing.

So slack, if you see that mesh networks could potentially help you, come talk to us.

HypeLabs https://hypelabs.io

Avatar of sergiotapia
Senior Software Engineer
Review ofSlackSlack

Slack is gorgeous and runs on multiple platforms - that's benefit #1. You can easily talk on your iMac then switch to your Android device on the fly.

The one thing I don't really like about it is how it handles multiple organization accounts.

I am a software consultant so I typically work with multiple teams over the months and it's odd to 'log into the right account'. It's not intuitive at all.

I would like there to be a way for users to easily pick a 'Persona' and not accidentally post to the wrong company.

Review ofSlackSlack

Slack filled a very complicated role and did it elegantly.

Its very well designed and easy to use. Adding integrations can be complicated but their documentation with images makes it very easy.

Also I contacted support and get a relevant answer quickly!

All this on the free plan, you better bet we will be upgrading soon.

Avatar of vamseev
Product Manager at StackShare
Review ofSlackSlack

Internal Communications made easy

How developers use Slack and Trello
Avatar of StackShare
StackShare uses SlackSlack

I first heard about Slack from my friend Matt (shout out to Final!). He was helping me out with some Rails issues so we started using Slack and I liked it. Specifically, the chat interaction. But also all the integrations. I wasn’t thinking of it as a tool to end all tools at first, just a chat tool with some cool integrations. Then I created a Slack account for StackShare, and that’s when things got real.

Sentry got easier to stay on top of, Heroku was easier to see activity from, discussions were more fluid, and the mobile app was killer. Most of the tools I use either don’t have a mobile app or have shitty ones. Slack is like a replacement for all the mobile apps my tools should have.

I don’t find Slack particularly useful for focused discussions, so I doubt it will replace email anytime soon for us. Things like product discussions/debates are best via email. It forces you to think before you type and have a clear back and forth with someone.

Small gripe: I wish Slack would disable email notifications by default, I still haven’t figured out how to turn those off.

Avatar of StackShare
StackShare uses TrelloTrello

We originally decided to use Trello because GitHub Issues were getting way too crowded and overwhelming. Also, GitHub Issues are great for detailed bits of work, but they're not so great at high-level tasks or buckets of work. The milestones stuff in there just doesn’t cut it.

We love Trello. It's great because it’s super flexible. Almost to a fault. The one thing I wish it had: velocity. Not sure why they don’t add that, but I would so use it. Right now we just add an estimate of hours at the top of the description field. I also wish they had a more robust Calendar and concept of time. Trying to get Trello to act like a product planning tool is almost impossible. And using other tools is a nightmare. So we’re kind of stuck using Trello as-is. But Trello as-is is > all the other PM tools we’ve tried (and we’ve tried a lot).

Avatar of shridhardalavi
shridhardalavi uses SlackSlack

Slack is an instant messaging and collaboration system It unifies your entire team communications, making your workflow, well, flow a lot better. It is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services. Slack teams allow communities, groups, or teams to join through a specific URL or invitation sent by a team admin or owner.

Avatar of SaberEsPoder
SaberEsPoder uses SlackSlack

Slack is our go-to communication tool and it's slowly replacing emails across all departments of the company. We built our own Slack Bot to help us with simple DevOps stuff; Honeybadger notifies us in real time of errors happening on production in our monitoring channel; CircleCI reports builds status and deployment info as well.

Avatar of Andrew Gatenby
Andrew Gatenby uses SlackSlack

Team comms is essential. The R&D team is distributed over two offices, as well as the chance that people are working from home. Slack provides lots of options of keeping individuals and groups up to date. We also use it to integrate into services such as Github and Sentry.

Avatar of Refractal
Refractal uses SlackSlack

Slack is a lifesaver, not only for our day to day team communications and it's direct links into our other tools, but for Beta testing as well, with our custom Slack bot in our beta group being an invaluable asset to avoid giving our testers direct JIRA access.

Avatar of Andrew Gatenby
Andrew Gatenby uses TrelloTrello

The various projects that we'll have on the go at any point in time, within the R&D team, are internal projects that will prove long term benefits. We use Trello to track individual tasks that comprise those projects, and work with them in an Agile approach.

Avatar of Kim Do Hyeon
Kim Do Hyeon uses TrelloTrello

리스트 목록: Inbox, ToDo, Doing, Done, 얘기해봐야할 것들, 디자인 Preview,런칭 후 개선할 것들, Document(컨플루언스 대신 씀. 로드맵 공유)

원랜 Github issue로 이슈트래킹을 했었는데 첫 개발땐 워낙 바뀌는것도 많고 빨리해야될것도 많고 해서 트렐로로 유연하게 관리하니까 좋음. 앞으로 사용자가 생기고 소스코드 풀면 github issue로 관리할 생각

Avatar of osu! Ripple
osu! Ripple uses TrelloTrello

Trello is the core of our workflow. All tasks to be done go on Trello, and whenever you have to work on something, you go on Trello to check out what you could work on. And it works perfectly for us.

Avatar of MyklClason
MyklClason uses TrelloTrello

I use Trello for organizing projects. Typically I break a project up into sections, add and prioritize tasks for each section. For largest projects, I'll break it into multiple trello boards.

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