Alternatives to NestJS logo

Alternatives to NestJS

AdonisJS, FeathersJS, Koa, LoopBack, and hapi are the most popular alternatives and competitors to NestJS.
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What is NestJS and what are its top alternatives?

Nest is a framework for building efficient, scalable Node.js server-side applications. It uses progressive JavaScript, is built with TypeScript (preserves compatibility with pure JavaScript) and combines elements of OOP (Object Oriented Programming), FP (Functional Programming), and FRP (Functional Reactive Programming). Under the hood, Nest makes use of Express, but also, provides compatibility with a wide range of other libraries, like e.g. Fastify, allowing for easy use of the myriad third-party plugins which are available.
NestJS is a tool in the Frameworks (Full Stack) category of a tech stack.
NestJS is an open source tool with 65.1K GitHub stars and 7.4K GitHub forks. Here’s a link to NestJS's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to NestJS

  • AdonisJS
    AdonisJS

    It is a Node.js Framework which is highly focused on developer ergonomics, stability and confidence. ...

  • FeathersJS
    FeathersJS

    Feathers is a real-time, micro-service web framework for NodeJS that gives you control over your data via RESTful resources, sockets and flexible plug-ins. ...

  • Koa
    Koa

    Koa aims to be a smaller, more expressive, and more robust foundation for web applications and APIs. Through leveraging generators Koa allows you to ditch callbacks and greatly increase error-handling. Koa does not bundle any middleware. ...

  • LoopBack
    LoopBack

    A highly-extensible, open-source Node.js framework that enables you to create dynamic end-to-end REST APIs with little or no coding. Connect to multiple data sources, write business logic in Node.js, glue on top of your existing services and data, connect using JS, iOS & Android SDKs. ...

  • hapi
    hapi

    hapi is a simple to use configuration-centric framework with built-in support for input validation, caching, authentication, and other essential facilities for building web applications and services. ...

  • ExpressJS
    ExpressJS

    Express is a minimal and flexible node.js web application framework, providing a robust set of features for building single and multi-page, and hybrid web applications. ...

  • Django
    Django

    Django is a high-level Python Web framework that encourages rapid development and clean, pragmatic design. ...

  • Node.js
    Node.js

    Node.js uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient, perfect for data-intensive real-time applications that run across distributed devices. ...

NestJS alternatives & related posts

AdonisJS logo

AdonisJS

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450
122
A Node.js web framework
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450
+ 1
122
PROS OF ADONISJS
  • 25
    Laravel like
  • 24
    Easy to learn
  • 23
    MVC
  • 21
    Beautiful code
  • 10
    ORM Mapper
  • 6
    Service Providers
  • 5
    Fast development
  • 4
    Easy to understand documentation
  • 2
    Typescript
  • 1
    Schema migrations
  • 1
    Ace command-line tool
CONS OF ADONISJS
  • 5
    Small community
  • 1
    Poor documentation

related AdonisJS posts

Shared insights
on
NestJSNestJSAdonisJSAdonisJS

I'm using AdonisJS and NestJS in two projects! both frameworks are good!

See more
FeathersJS logo

FeathersJS

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70
Real-time, micro-service web framework for NodeJS
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+ 1
70
PROS OF FEATHERSJS
  • 12
    Real-time
  • 7
    Choose any ORM
  • 7
    Datastore Agnostic
  • 6
    Flexible Plugins
  • 5
    Choose Socketio or Primus
  • 4
    Easy Rest
  • 4
    Isomorphic Services API
  • 4
    Open source
  • 3
    Scalable
  • 3
    Easy to use with Graphql
  • 3
    Documentation
  • 3
    Service-oriented architecture
  • 3
    Data-driven APIs
  • 3
    Uses express, will support other options soon
  • 3
    Advanced Composable Service Middleware called holds
CONS OF FEATHERSJS
    Be the first to leave a con

    related FeathersJS posts

    Quasar Framework FeathersJS Node.js Vue.js SendinBlue Zeit Now GitHub

    It was almost too easy to build a complete Feathers Rest API combined with Quasar SSR and reactive form that we are serving through an i-frame within our main site for serving our newsletter signup and opt-in page. Total time: 15 hrs. Check it out:

    https://quasar.dev/newsletter

    See more

    Recently I have been working on an open source stack to help people consolidate their personal health data in a single database so that AI and analytics apps can be run against it to find personalized treatments. We chose to go with a #containerized approach leveraging Docker #containers with a local development environment setup with Docker Compose and nginx for container routing. For the production environment we chose to pull code from GitHub and build/push images using Jenkins and using Kubernetes to deploy to Amazon EC2.

    We also implemented a dashboard app to handle user authentication/authorization, as well as a custom SSO server that runs on Heroku which allows experts to easily visit more than one instance without having to login repeatedly. The #Backend was implemented using my favorite #Stack which consists of FeathersJS on top of Node.js and ExpressJS with PostgreSQL as the main database. The #Frontend was implemented using React, Redux.js, Semantic UI React and the FeathersJS client. Though testing was light on this project, we chose to use AVA as well as ESLint to keep the codebase clean and consistent.

    See more
    Koa logo

    Koa

    715
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    12
    Next generation web framework for node.js
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    483
    + 1
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    PROS OF KOA
    • 6
      Async/Await
    • 5
      JavaScript
    • 1
      REST API
    CONS OF KOA
      Be the first to leave a con

      related Koa posts

      ReactQL is a React + GraphQL front-end starter kit. #JSX is a natural way to think about building UI, and it renders to pure #HTML in the browser and on the server, making it trivial to build server-rendered Single Page Apps. GraphQL via Apollo was chosen for the data layer; #GraphQL makes it simple to request just the data your app needs, and #Apollo takes care of communicating with your API (written in any language; doesn't have to be JavaScript!), caching, and rendering to #React.

      ReactQL is written in TypeScript to provide full types/Intellisense, and pick up hard-to-diagnose goofs that might later show up at runtime. React makes heavy use of Webpack 4 to handle transforming your code to an optimised client-side bundle, and in throws back just enough code needed for the initial render, while seamlessly handling import statements asynchronously as needed, making the payload your user downloads ultimately much smaller than trying to do it by hand.

      React Helmet was chosen to handle <head> content, because it works universally, making it easy to throw back the correct <title> and other tags on the initial render, as well as inject new tags for subsequent client-side views.

      styled-components, Sass, Less and PostCSS were added to give developers a choice of whether to build styles purely in React / JavaScript, or whether to defer to a #css #preprocessor. This is especially useful for interop with UI frameworks like Bootstrap, Semantic UI, Foundation, etc - ReactQL lets you mix and match #css and renders to both a static .css file during bundling as well as generates per-page <style> tags when using #StyledComponents.

      React Router handles routing, because it works both on the server and in the client. ReactQL customises it further by capturing non-200 responses on the server, redirecting or throwing back custom 404 pages as needed.

      Koa is the web server that handles all incoming HTTP requests, because it's fast (TTFB < 5ms, even after fully rendering React), and its natively #async, making it easy to async/await inside routes and middleware.

      See more
      Antonio Kobashikawa
      Web developer | Blogger | Freelancer at Rulo Kobashikawa · | 6 upvotes · 239.4K views

      We are using Node.js and ExpressJS to build a REST services that is middleware of a legacy system. MongoDB as database. Vue.js helps us to make rapid UI to test use cases. Frontend is build for mobile with Ionic . We like using JavaScript and ES6 .

      I think next step could be to use Koa but I am not sure.

      See more
      LoopBack logo

      LoopBack

      286
      556
      33
      Build modern API applications that require complex integrations
      286
      556
      + 1
      33
      PROS OF LOOPBACK
      • 11
        Need a nodejs ReST-API, DB, AAA, Swagger? Then loopback
      • 9
        Easy Database Migration
      • 6
        Code generator
      • 4
        The future of API's
      • 2
        GraphQL
      • 1
        Typescript
      CONS OF LOOPBACK
      • 7
        Community is slow
      • 1
        Backward compatibility

      related LoopBack posts

      Priit Kaasik
      CTO at Katana Cloud Inventory · | 8 upvotes · 418K views

      We undertook the task of building a manufacturing ERP for small branded manufacturers. We needed to build a lot, fast with a small team, and have clear focus on product delivery. We chose JavaScript / Node.js ( React + LoopBack full stack) , Heroku and Heroku Postgres (also Heroku Redis ) . This decision has guided us to picking other key technologies. It has granted us high pace of product delivery and service availability while operating with a small team.

      See more

      We have an existing (Apis only) Rails backend, that by default follows the MVC pattern, (at peaks of 700 requests a second). I am tasked with making the same (read-heavy) application in any JavaScript framework. I was advised to follow the MVC structure. So I am considering these 3 ( Sails.js, LoopBack, NestJS). I get that sails is closest to rails, but that's not particularly a priority.

      See more
      hapi logo

      hapi

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      Server Framework for Node.js
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      + 1
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      PROS OF HAPI
      • 27
        Makes me Hapi making REST APIs
      • 14
        Simpler than other REST libraries
      • 14
        Configuration
      • 13
        Quality Driven Ecosystem
      • 13
        Modularization
      • 5
        Easy testability
      • 1
        Better validation
      • 0
        Restify
      CONS OF HAPI
        Be the first to leave a con

        related hapi posts

        Tim Nolet

        Heroku Docker GitHub Node.js hapi Vue.js AWS Lambda Amazon S3 PostgreSQL Knex.js Checkly is a fairly young company and we're still working hard to find the correct mix of product features, price and audience.

        We are focussed on tech B2B, but I always wanted to serve solo developers too. So I decided to make a $7 plan.

        Why $7? Simply put, it seems to be a sweet spot for tech companies: Heroku, Docker, Github, Appoptics (Librato) all offer $7 plans. They must have done a ton of research into this, so why not piggy back that and try it out.

        Enough biz talk, onto tech. The challenges were:

        • Slice of a portion of the functionality so a $7 plan is still profitable. We call this the "plan limits"
        • Update API and back end services to handle and enforce plan limits.
        • Update the UI to kindly state plan limits are in effect on some part of the UI.
        • Update the pricing page to reflect all changes.
        • Keep the actual processing backend, storage and API's as untouched as possible.

        In essence, we went from strictly volume based pricing to value based pricing. Here come the technical steps & decisions we made to get there.

        1. We updated our PostgreSQL schema so plans now have an array of "features". These are string constants that represent feature toggles.
        2. The Vue.js frontend reads these from the vuex store on login.
        3. Based on these values, the UI has simple v-if statements to either just show the feature or show a friendly "please upgrade" button.
        4. The hapi API has a hook on each relevant API endpoint that checks whether a user's plan has the feature enabled, or not.

        Side note: We offer 10 SMS messages per month on the developer plan. However, we were not actually counting how many people were sending. We had to update our alerting daemon (that runs on Heroku and triggers SMS messages via AWS SNS) to actually bump a counter.

        What we build is basically feature-toggling based on plan features. It is very extensible for future additions. Our scheduling and storage backend that actually runs users' monitoring requests (AWS Lambda) and stores the results (S3 and Postgres) has no knowledge of all of this and remained unchanged.

        Hope this helps anyone building out their SaaS and is in a similar situation.

        See more
        Tim Nolet

        JavaScript Node.js hapi Vue.js Swagger UI Slate

        Two weeks ago we released the public API for Checkly. We already had an API that was serving our frontend Vue.js app. We decided to create an new set of API endpoints and not reuse the already existing one. The blog post linked below details what parts we needed to refactor, what parts we added and how we handled generating API documentation. More specifically, the post dives into:

        • Refactoring the existing Hapi.js based API
        • API key based authentication
        • Refactoring models with Objection.js
        • Validating plan limits
        • Generating Swagger & Slate based documentation
        See more
        ExpressJS logo

        ExpressJS

        31.5K
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        Sinatra inspired web development framework for node.js -- insanely fast, flexible, and simple
        31.5K
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        + 1
        1.6K
        PROS OF EXPRESSJS
        • 380
          Simple
        • 336
          Node.js
        • 244
          Javascript
        • 193
          High performance
        • 152
          Robust routing
        • 73
          Middlewares
        • 71
          Open source
        • 59
          Great community
        • 37
          Hybrid web applications
        • 16
          Well documented
        • 9
          Rapid development
        • 9
          Sinatra inspired
        • 7
          Socket connection
        • 7
          Isomorphic js.. superfast and easy
        • 5
          Light weight
        • 4
          Resource available for learning
        • 4
          Npm
        • 3
          Event loop
        • 3
          Callbacks
        • 2
          Data stream
        CONS OF EXPRESSJS
        • 27
          Not python
        • 17
          Overrated
        • 14
          No multithreading
        • 9
          Javascript
        • 5
          Not fast
        • 3
          Easily Insecure for Novices

        related ExpressJS posts

        Simon Reymann
        Senior Fullstack Developer at QUANTUSflow Software GmbH · | 27 upvotes · 4.8M views

        Our whole Node.js backend stack consists of the following tools:

        • Lerna as a tool for multi package and multi repository management
        • npm as package manager
        • NestJS as Node.js framework
        • TypeScript as programming language
        • ExpressJS as web server
        • Swagger UI for visualizing and interacting with the API’s resources
        • Postman as a tool for API development
        • TypeORM as object relational mapping layer
        • JSON Web Token for access token management

        The main reason we have chosen Node.js over PHP is related to the following artifacts:

        • Made for the web and widely in use: Node.js is a software platform for developing server-side network services. Well-known projects that rely on Node.js include the blogging software Ghost, the project management tool Trello and the operating system WebOS. Node.js requires the JavaScript runtime environment V8, which was specially developed by Google for the popular Chrome browser. This guarantees a very resource-saving architecture, which qualifies Node.js especially for the operation of a web server. Ryan Dahl, the developer of Node.js, released the first stable version on May 27, 2009. He developed Node.js out of dissatisfaction with the possibilities that JavaScript offered at the time. The basic functionality of Node.js has been mapped with JavaScript since the first version, which can be expanded with a large number of different modules. The current package managers (npm or Yarn) for Node.js know more than 1,000,000 of these modules.
        • Fast server-side solutions: Node.js adopts the JavaScript "event-loop" to create non-blocking I/O applications that conveniently serve simultaneous events. With the standard available asynchronous processing within JavaScript/TypeScript, highly scalable, server-side solutions can be realized. The efficient use of the CPU and the RAM is maximized and more simultaneous requests can be processed than with conventional multi-thread servers.
        • A language along the entire stack: Widely used frameworks such as React or AngularJS or Vue.js, which we prefer, are written in JavaScript/TypeScript. If Node.js is now used on the server side, you can use all the advantages of a uniform script language throughout the entire application development. The same language in the back- and frontend simplifies the maintenance of the application and also the coordination within the development team.
        • Flexibility: Node.js sets very few strict dependencies, rules and guidelines and thus grants a high degree of flexibility in application development. There are no strict conventions so that the appropriate architecture, design structures, modules and features can be freely selected for the development.
        See more

        Repost

        Overview: To put it simply, we plan to use the MERN stack to build our web application. MongoDB will be used as our primary database. We will use ExpressJS alongside Node.js to set up our API endpoints. Additionally, we plan to use React to build our SPA on the client side and use Redis on the server side as our primary caching solution. Initially, while working on the project, we plan to deploy our server and client both on Heroku . However, Heroku is very limited and we will need the benefits of an Infrastructure as a Service so we will use Amazon EC2 to later deploy our final version of the application.

        Serverside: nodemon will allow us to automatically restart a running instance of our node app when files changes take place. We decided to use MongoDB because it is a non relational database which uses the Document Object Model. This allows a lot of flexibility as compared to a RDMS like SQL which requires a very structural model of data that does not change too much. Another strength of MongoDB is its ease in scalability. We will use Mongoose along side MongoDB to model our application data. Additionally, we will host our MongoDB cluster remotely on MongoDB Atlas. Bcrypt will be used to encrypt user passwords that will be stored in the DB. This is to avoid the risks of storing plain text passwords. Moreover, we will use Cloudinary to store images uploaded by the user. We will also use the Twilio SendGrid API to enable automated emails sent by our application. To protect private API endpoints, we will use JSON Web Token and Passport. Also, PayPal will be used as a payment gateway to accept payments from users.

        Client Side: As mentioned earlier, we will use React to build our SPA. React uses a virtual DOM which is very efficient in rendering a page. Also React will allow us to reuse components. Furthermore, it is very popular and there is a large community that uses React so it can be helpful if we run into issues. We also plan to make a cross platform mobile application later and using React will allow us to reuse a lot of our code with React Native. Redux will be used to manage state. Redux works great with React and will help us manage a global state in the app and avoid the complications of each component having its own state. Additionally, we will use Bootstrap components and custom CSS to style our app.

        Other: Git will be used for version control. During the later stages of our project, we will use Google Analytics to collect useful data regarding user interactions. Moreover, Slack will be our primary communication tool. Also, we will use Visual Studio Code as our primary code editor because it is very light weight and has a wide variety of extensions that will boost productivity. Postman will be used to interact with and debug our API endpoints.

        See more
        Django logo

        Django

        37.1K
        33.6K
        4.2K
        The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines
        37.1K
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        + 1
        4.2K
        PROS OF DJANGO
        • 671
          Rapid development
        • 487
          Open source
        • 424
          Great community
        • 379
          Easy to learn
        • 276
          Mvc
        • 232
          Beautiful code
        • 223
          Elegant
        • 206
          Free
        • 203
          Great packages
        • 194
          Great libraries
        • 79
          Comes with auth and crud admin panel
        • 79
          Restful
        • 78
          Powerful
        • 75
          Great documentation
        • 71
          Great for web
        • 57
          Python
        • 43
          Great orm
        • 41
          Great for api
        • 32
          All included
        • 29
          Fast
        • 25
          Web Apps
        • 23
          Easy setup
        • 23
          Clean
        • 21
          Used by top startups
        • 19
          Sexy
        • 19
          ORM
        • 15
          The Django community
        • 14
          Allows for very rapid development with great libraries
        • 14
          Convention over configuration
        • 11
          King of backend world
        • 10
          Full stack
        • 10
          Great MVC and templating engine
        • 8
          Fast prototyping
        • 8
          Mvt
        • 7
          Easy to develop end to end AI Models
        • 7
          Batteries included
        • 7
          Its elegant and practical
        • 6
          Have not found anything that it can't do
        • 6
          Very quick to get something up and running
        • 6
          Cross-Platform
        • 5
          Easy Structure , useful inbuilt library
        • 5
          Great peformance
        • 5
          Zero code burden to change databases
        • 5
          Python community
        • 4
          Map
        • 4
          Just the right level of abstraction
        • 4
          Easy to change database manager
        • 4
          Modular
        • 4
          Many libraries
        • 4
          Easy to use
        • 4
          Easy
        • 4
          Full-Text Search
        • 3
          Scaffold
        • 1
          Fastapi
        • 1
          Built in common security
        • 1
          Scalable
        • 1
          Great default admin panel
        • 1
          Node js
        • 1
          Gigante ta
        • 0
          Rails
        CONS OF DJANGO
        • 26
          Underpowered templating
        • 22
          Autoreload restarts whole server
        • 22
          Underpowered ORM
        • 15
          URL dispatcher ignores HTTP method
        • 10
          Internal subcomponents coupling
        • 8
          Not nodejs
        • 8
          Configuration hell
        • 7
          Admin
        • 5
          Not as clean and nice documentation like Laravel
        • 4
          Python
        • 3
          Not typed
        • 3
          Bloated admin panel included
        • 2
          Overwhelming folder structure
        • 2
          InEffective Multithreading
        • 1
          Not type safe

        related Django posts

        Dmitry Mukhin
        Engineer at Uploadcare · | 25 upvotes · 2.4M views

        Simple controls over complex technologies, as we put it, wouldn't be possible without neat UIs for our user areas including start page, dashboard, settings, and docs.

        Initially, there was Django. Back in 2011, considering our Python-centric approach, that was the best choice. Later, we realized we needed to iterate on our website more quickly. And this led us to detaching Django from our front end. That was when we decided to build an SPA.

        For building user interfaces, we're currently using React as it provided the fastest rendering back when we were building our toolkit. It’s worth mentioning Uploadcare is not a front-end-focused SPA: we aren’t running at high levels of complexity. If it were, we’d go with Ember.js.

        However, there's a chance we will shift to the faster Preact, with its motto of using as little code as possible, and because it makes more use of browser APIs. One of our future tasks for our front end is to configure our Webpack bundler to split up the code for different site sections. For styles, we use PostCSS along with its plugins such as cssnano which minifies all the code.

        All that allows us to provide a great user experience and quickly implement changes where they are needed with as little code as possible.

        See more

        Hey, so I developed a basic application with Python. But to use it, you need a python interpreter. I want to add a GUI to make it more appealing. What should I choose to develop a GUI? I have very basic skills in front end development (CSS, JavaScript). I am fluent in python. I'm looking for a tool that is easy to use and doesn't require too much code knowledge. I have recently tried out Flask, but it is kinda complicated. Should I stick with it, move to Django, or is there another nice framework to use?

        See more
        Node.js logo

        Node.js

        185.2K
        157.2K
        8.5K
        A platform built on Chrome's JavaScript runtime for easily building fast, scalable network applications
        185.2K
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        PROS OF NODE.JS
        • 1.4K
          Npm
        • 1.3K
          Javascript
        • 1.1K
          Great libraries
        • 1K
          High-performance
        • 805
          Open source
        • 486
          Great for apis
        • 477
          Asynchronous
        • 423
          Great community
        • 390
          Great for realtime apps
        • 296
          Great for command line utilities
        • 84
          Websockets
        • 83
          Node Modules
        • 69
          Uber Simple
        • 59
          Great modularity
        • 58
          Allows us to reuse code in the frontend
        • 42
          Easy to start
        • 35
          Great for Data Streaming
        • 32
          Realtime
        • 28
          Awesome
        • 25
          Non blocking IO
        • 18
          Can be used as a proxy
        • 17
          High performance, open source, scalable
        • 16
          Non-blocking and modular
        • 15
          Easy and Fun
        • 14
          Easy and powerful
        • 13
          Future of BackEnd
        • 13
          Same lang as AngularJS
        • 12
          Fullstack
        • 11
          Fast
        • 10
          Scalability
        • 10
          Cross platform
        • 9
          Simple
        • 8
          Mean Stack
        • 7
          Great for webapps
        • 7
          Easy concurrency
        • 6
          Typescript
        • 6
          Fast, simple code and async
        • 6
          React
        • 6
          Friendly
        • 5
          Control everything
        • 5
          Its amazingly fast and scalable
        • 5
          Easy to use and fast and goes well with JSONdb's
        • 5
          Scalable
        • 5
          Great speed
        • 5
          Fast development
        • 4
          It's fast
        • 4
          Easy to use
        • 4
          Isomorphic coolness
        • 3
          Great community
        • 3
          Not Python
        • 3
          Sooper easy for the Backend connectivity
        • 3
          TypeScript Support
        • 3
          Blazing fast
        • 3
          Performant and fast prototyping
        • 3
          Easy to learn
        • 3
          Easy
        • 3
          Scales, fast, simple, great community, npm, express
        • 3
          One language, end-to-end
        • 3
          Less boilerplate code
        • 2
          Npm i ape-updating
        • 2
          Event Driven
        • 2
          Lovely
        • 1
          Creat for apis
        • 0
          Node
        CONS OF NODE.JS
        • 46
          Bound to a single CPU
        • 45
          New framework every day
        • 40
          Lots of terrible examples on the internet
        • 33
          Asynchronous programming is the worst
        • 24
          Callback
        • 19
          Javascript
        • 11
          Dependency hell
        • 11
          Dependency based on GitHub
        • 10
          Low computational power
        • 7
          Very very Slow
        • 7
          Can block whole server easily
        • 7
          Callback functions may not fire on expected sequence
        • 4
          Breaking updates
        • 4
          Unstable
        • 3
          Unneeded over complication
        • 3
          No standard approach
        • 1
          Bad transitive dependency management
        • 1
          Can't read server session

        related Node.js posts

        Shared insights
        on
        Node.jsNode.jsGraphQLGraphQLMongoDBMongoDB

        I just finished the very first version of my new hobby project: #MovieGeeks. It is a minimalist online movie catalog for you to save the movies you want to see and for rating the movies you already saw. This is just the beginning as I am planning to add more features on the lines of sharing and discovery

        For the #BackEnd I decided to use Node.js , GraphQL and MongoDB:

        1. Node.js has a huge community so it will always be a safe choice in terms of libraries and finding solutions to problems you may have

        2. GraphQL because I needed to improve my skills with it and because I was never comfortable with the usual REST approach. I believe GraphQL is a better option as it feels more natural to write apis, it improves the development velocity, by definition it fixes the over-fetching and under-fetching problem that is so common on REST apis, and on top of that, the community is getting bigger and bigger.

        3. MongoDB was my choice for the database as I already have a lot of experience working on it and because, despite of some bad reputation it has acquired in the last months, I still believe it is a powerful database for at least a very long list of use cases such as the one I needed for my website

        See more
        Nick Rockwell
        SVP, Engineering at Fastly · | 46 upvotes · 3.5M views

        When I joined NYT there was already broad dissatisfaction with the LAMP (Linux Apache HTTP Server MySQL PHP) Stack and the front end framework, in particular. So, I wasn't passing judgment on it. I mean, LAMP's fine, you can do good work in LAMP. It's a little dated at this point, but it's not ... I didn't want to rip it out for its own sake, but everyone else was like, "We don't like this, it's really inflexible." And I remember from being outside the company when that was called MIT FIVE when it had launched. And been observing it from the outside, and I was like, you guys took so long to do that and you did it so carefully, and yet you're not happy with your decisions. Why is that? That was more the impetus. If we're going to do this again, how are we going to do it in a way that we're gonna get a better result?

        So we're moving quickly away from LAMP, I would say. So, right now, the new front end is React based and using Apollo. And we've been in a long, protracted, gradual rollout of the core experiences.

        React is now talking to GraphQL as a primary API. There's a Node.js back end, to the front end, which is mainly for server-side rendering, as well.

        Behind there, the main repository for the GraphQL server is a big table repository, that we call Bodega because it's a convenience store. And that reads off of a Kafka pipeline.

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