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Alternatives to Beanstalk

AWS Elastic Beanstalk, GitHub, Bitbucket, GitLab, and GitHub Enterprise are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Beanstalk.
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What is Beanstalk and what are its top alternatives?

A single process to commit code, review with the team, and deploy the final result to your customers.
Beanstalk is a tool in the Code Collaboration & Version Control category of a tech stack.

Beanstalk alternatives & related posts

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Julien DeFrance
Julien DeFrance
Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter · | 16 upvotes · 890.6K views
atSmartZipSmartZip
Rails
Rails
Rails API
Rails API
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Capistrano
Capistrano
Docker
Docker
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
MySQL
MySQL
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon RDS for Aurora
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache
Memcached
Memcached
Amazon CloudFront
Amazon CloudFront
Segment
Segment
Zapier
Zapier
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Redshift
Amazon Quicksight
Amazon Quicksight
Superset
Superset
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
New Relic
New Relic
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Node.js
Node.js
Ruby
Ruby
Amazon DynamoDB
Amazon DynamoDB
Algolia
Algolia

Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

Future improvements / technology decisions included:

Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

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AWS Elastic Beanstalk
AWS Elastic Beanstalk
Heroku
Heroku
Ruby
Ruby
Rails
Rails
Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL
MariaDB
MariaDB
Microsoft SQL Server
Microsoft SQL Server
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
AWS Lambda
AWS Lambda
Python
Python
Redis
Redis
Memcached
Memcached
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB)
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Amazon Elasticsearch Service
Amazon ElastiCache
Amazon ElastiCache

We initially started out with Heroku as our PaaS provider due to a desire to use it by our original developer for our Ruby on Rails application/website at the time. We were finding response times slow, it was painfully slow, sometimes taking 10 seconds to start loading the main page. Moving up to the next "compute" level was going to be very expensive.

We moved our site over to AWS Elastic Beanstalk , not only did response times on the site practically become instant, our cloud bill for the application was cut in half.

In database world we are currently using Amazon RDS for PostgreSQL also, we have both MariaDB and Microsoft SQL Server both hosted on Amazon RDS. The plan is to migrate to AWS Aurora Serverless for all 3 of those database systems.

Additional services we use for our public applications: AWS Lambda, Python, Redis, Memcached, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon Elasticsearch Service, Amazon ElastiCache

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GitHub logo

GitHub

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Powerful collaboration, review, and code management for open source and private development projects
GitHub logo
GitHub
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Beanstalk

related GitHub posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 19 upvotes · 214.5K views
atZulipZulip
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

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Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 17 upvotes · 232.7K views
npm
npm
Vue.js
Vue.js
vuex
vuex
JavaScript
JavaScript
Pug
Pug
Sass
Sass
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
ES6
ES6
Asana
Asana
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
PHP
PHP
Babel
Babel

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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related Bitbucket posts

Michael Kelly
Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 244.4K views
atACK FoundryACK Foundry
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
GitLab Pages
GitLab Pages
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
#OpenSourceCloud

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
#Githubmarketplace

A bit difference in GitHub and GitLab though both are Version Control repository management services which provides key component in the software development workflow. A decision of choosing GitHub over GitLab is major leap extension from code management, to deployment and monitoring alongside looking beyond the code base hosting provided best fitted tools for developer communities.

  • Authentication stages - With GitLab you can set and modify people’s permissions according to their role. In GitHub, you can decide if someone gets a read or write access to a repository.
  • Built-In Continuous Integrations - GitLab offers its very own CI for free. No need to use an external CI service. And if you are already used to an external CI, you can obviously integrate with Jenkins, etc whereas GitHub offers various 3rd party integrations – such as Travis CI, CircleCI or Codeship – for running and testing your code. However, there’s no built-in CI solution at the moment.
  • Import/Export Resources - GitLab offers detailed documentation on how to import your data from other vendors – such as GitHub, Bitbucket to GitLab. GitHub, on the other hand, does not offer such detailed documentation for the most common git repositories. However, GitHub offers to use GitHub Importer if you have your source code in Subversion, Mercurial, TFS and others.

Also when it comes to exporting data, GitLab seems to do a pretty solid job, offering you the ability to export your projects including the following data:

  • Wiki and project repositories
  • Project uploads
  • The configuration including webhooks and services
  • Issues with comments, merge requests with diffs and comments, labels, milestones, snippets, and other project entities.

GitHub, on the other hand, seems to be more restrictive when it comes to export features of existing GitHub repositories. * Integrations - #githubmarketplace gives you an essence to have multiple and competitive integrations whereas you will find less in the GitLab.

So go ahead with better understanding.

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related GitLab posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 19 upvotes · 214.5K views
atZulipZulip
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

See more
Michael Kelly
Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 244.4K views
atACK FoundryACK Foundry
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
GitLab Pages
GitLab Pages
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
#OpenSourceCloud

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

See more
GitHub Enterprise logo

GitHub Enterprise

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The on-premises version of GitHub, which you can deploy and manage in your own, secure environment
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related AWS CodeCommit posts

Mojolicious
Mojolicious
Perl
Perl
Redmine
Redmine
Redis
Redis
AWS CodeCommit
AWS CodeCommit
Amazon SES
Amazon SES
PostgreSQL
PostgreSQL
Postman
Postman
Docker
Docker
jQuery
jQuery
VirtualBox
VirtualBox
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
GitHub
GitHub
Git
Git
GitLab CI
GitLab CI

Mojolicious Perl Redmine Redis AWS CodeCommit Amazon SES PostgreSQL Postman Docker jQuery VirtualBox Sublime Text GitHub Git GitLab CI @DBIx::Class @metacpan @TheBat

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related Gogs posts

Russtopia Labs
Russtopia Labs
Sr. Doodad Imagineer at Russtopia Labs · | 3 upvotes · 40.8K views
Gogs
Gogs
GitHub
GitHub
Go
Go
GitLab
GitLab

I installed Gogs after a few repos I planned to use on GitHub disappeared without explanation, and after Microsoft's acquisition of same, it made me think about the over-centralization of community-developed software. A self-hosted solution that enables easy point-and-click mirroring of important repositories for my projects, both in-house and 3rd-party, ensures I won't be bitten by upstream catastrophes. (So far, Microsoft's stewardship has been fine, but always be prepared). It's also a very nice way to host one's own private repos before they're ready for prime-time on github.

Gogs is written in Go and is easy to install and configure, much more so than GitLab. The only major feature I wish it had is an integrated code review tool, but the web plugin hypothes.is https://stackshare.io/hypothes-is/hypothes-is actually is quite suitable as a code review tool. Set up a group for each code review, and just highlight lines to add comments in pull request pages of Gogs.

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JFrog Artifactory

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Enterprise Universal Repository Manager
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    Google Cloud Source Repositories

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    A single place for your team to store, manage, and track code
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      Google Cloud Source Repositories
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      GitBucket logo

      GitBucket

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      The easily installable Github clone powered by Scala
      GitBucket logo
      GitBucket
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      Siddhant Sharma
      Siddhant Sharma
      Tech Connoisseur at Bigstep Technologies · | 2 upvotes · 10.6K views
      GitBucket
      GitBucket