Alternatives to Elm logo

Alternatives to Elm

TypeScript, React, PureScript, ReasonML, and Haskell are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Elm.
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What is Elm and what are its top alternatives?

Writing HTML apps is super easy with elm-lang/html. Not only does it render extremely fast, it also quietly guides you towards well-architected code.
Elm is a tool in the Languages category of a tech stack.
Elm is an open source tool with 6.5K GitHub stars and 573 GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Elm's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Elm

  • TypeScript

    TypeScript

    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. ...

  • React

    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • PureScript

    PureScript

    A small strongly typed programming language with expressive types that compiles to JavaScript, written in and inspired by Haskell. ...

  • ReasonML

    ReasonML

    It lets you write simple, fast and quality type safe code while leveraging both the JavaScript & OCaml ecosystems.It is powerful, safe type inference means you rarely have to annotate types, but everything gets checked for you. ...

  • Haskell

    Haskell

    It is a general purpose language that can be used in any domain and use case, it is ideally suited for proprietary business logic and data analysis, fast prototyping and enhancing existing software environments with correct code, performance and scalability. ...

  • Svelte

    Svelte

    If you've ever built a JavaScript application, the chances are you've encountered – or at least heard of – frameworks like React, Angular, Vue and Ractive. Like Svelte, these tools all share a goal of making it easy to build slick interactive user interfaces. Rather than interpreting your application code at run time, your app is converted into ideal JavaScript at build time. That means you don't pay the performance cost of the framework's abstractions, or incur a penalty when your app first loads. ...

  • Elixir

    Elixir

    Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain. ...

  • JavaScript

    JavaScript

    JavaScript is most known as the scripting language for Web pages, but used in many non-browser environments as well such as node.js or Apache CouchDB. It is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm scripting language that is dynamic,and supports object-oriented, imperative, and functional programming styles. ...

Elm alternatives & related posts

TypeScript logo

TypeScript

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33.2K
461
A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output
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33.2K
+ 1
461
PROS OF TYPESCRIPT
  • 162
    More intuitive and type safe javascript
  • 97
    Type safe
  • 73
    JavaScript superset
  • 46
    The best AltJS ever
  • 27
    Best AltJS for BackEnd
  • 14
    Powerful type system, including generics & JS features
  • 10
    Nice and seamless hybrid of static and dynamic typing
  • 9
    Aligned with ES development for compatibility
  • 9
    Compile time errors
  • 6
    Structural, rather than nominal, subtyping
  • 5
    Angular
  • 3
    Starts and ends with JavaScript
CONS OF TYPESCRIPT
  • 4
    Code may look heavy and confusing
  • 1
    Hype

related TypeScript posts

Yshay Yaacobi

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

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Jonathan Pugh
Software Engineer / Project Manager / Technical Architect · | 25 upvotes · 1.4M views

I needed to choose a full stack of tools for cross platform mobile application design & development. After much research and trying different tools, these are what I came up with that work for me today:

For the client coding I chose Framework7 because of its performance, easy learning curve, and very well designed, beautiful UI widgets. I think it's perfect for solo development or small teams. I didn't like React Native. It felt heavy to me and rigid. Framework7 allows the use of #CSS3, which I think is the best technology to come out of the #WWW movement. No other tech has been able to allow designers and developers to develop such flexible, high performance, customisable user interface elements that are highly responsive and hardware accelerated before. Now #CSS3 includes variables and flexboxes it is truly a powerful language and there is no longer a need for preprocessors such as #SCSS / #Sass / #less. React Native contains a very limited interpretation of #CSS3 which I found very frustrating after using #CSS3 for some years already and knowing its powerful features. The other very nice feature of Framework7 is that you can even build for the browser if you want your app to be available for desktop web browsers. The latest release also includes the ability to build for #Electron so you can have MacOS, Windows and Linux desktop apps. This is not possible with React Native yet.

Framework7 runs on top of Apache Cordova. Cordova and webviews have been slated as being slow in the past. Having a game developer background I found the tweeks to make it run as smooth as silk. One of those tweeks is to use WKWebView. Another important one was using srcset on images.

I use #Template7 for the for the templating system which is a no-nonsense mobile-centric #HandleBars style extensible templating system. It's easy to write custom helpers for, is fast and has a small footprint. I'm not forced into a new paradigm or learning some new syntax. It operates with standard JavaScript, HTML5 and CSS 3. It's written by the developer of Framework7 and so dovetails with it as expected.

I configured TypeScript to work with the latest version of Framework7. I consider TypeScript to be one of the best creations to come out of Microsoft in some time. They must have an amazing team working on it. It's very powerful and flexible. It helps you catch a lot of bugs and also provides code completion in supporting IDEs. So for my IDE I use Visual Studio Code which is a blazingly fast and silky smooth editor that integrates seamlessly with TypeScript for the ultimate type checking setup (both products are produced by Microsoft).

I use Webpack and Babel to compile the JavaScript. TypeScript can compile to JavaScript directly but Babel offers a few more options and polyfills so you can use the latest (and even prerelease) JavaScript features today and compile to be backwards compatible with virtually any browser. My favorite recent addition is "optional chaining" which greatly simplifies and increases readability of a number of sections of my code dealing with getting and setting data in nested objects.

I use some Ruby scripts to process images with ImageMagick and pngquant to optimise for size and even auto insert responsive image code into the HTML5. Ruby is the ultimate cross platform scripting language. Even as your scripts become large, Ruby allows you to refactor your code easily and make it Object Oriented if necessary. I find it the quickest and easiest way to maintain certain aspects of my build process.

For the user interface design and prototyping I use Figma. Figma has an almost identical user interface to #Sketch but has the added advantage of being cross platform (MacOS and Windows). Its real-time collaboration features are outstanding and I use them a often as I work mostly on remote projects. Clients can collaborate in real-time and see changes I make as I make them. The clickable prototyping features in Figma are also very well designed and mean I can send clickable prototypes to clients to try user interface updates as they are made and get immediate feedback. I'm currently also evaluating the latest version of #AdobeXD as an alternative to Figma as it has the very cool auto-animate feature. It doesn't have real-time collaboration yet, but I heard it is proposed for 2019.

For the UI icons I use Font Awesome Pro. They have the largest selection and best looking icons you can find on the internet with several variations in styles so you can find most of the icons you want for standard projects.

For the backend I was using the #GraphCool Framework. As I later found out, #GraphQL still has some way to go in order to provide the full power of a mature graph query language so later in my project I ripped out #GraphCool and replaced it with CouchDB and Pouchdb. Primarily so I could provide good offline app support. CouchDB with Pouchdb is very flexible and efficient combination and overcomes some of the restrictions I found in #GraphQL and hence #GraphCool also. The most impressive and important feature of CouchDB is its replication. You can configure it in various ways for backups, fault tolerance, caching or conditional merging of databases. CouchDB and Pouchdb even supports storing, retrieving and serving binary or image data or other mime types. This removes a level of complexity usually present in database implementations where binary or image data is usually referenced through an #HTML5 link. With CouchDB and Pouchdb apps can operate offline and sync later, very efficiently, when the network connection is good.

I use PhoneGap when testing the app. It auto-reloads your app when its code is changed and you can also install it on Android phones to preview your app instantly. iOS is a bit more tricky cause of Apple's policies so it's not available on the App Store, but you can build it and install it yourself to your device.

So that's my latest mobile stack. What tools do you use? Have you tried these ones?

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React logo

React

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A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
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+ 1
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PROS OF REACT
  • 751
    Components
  • 651
    Virtual dom
  • 558
    Performance
  • 484
    Simplicity
  • 436
    Composable
  • 174
    Data flow
  • 159
    Declarative
  • 123
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 113
    Reactive updates
  • 110
    Explicit app state
  • 31
    JSX
  • 23
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 18
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 16
    Easy to Use
  • 14
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 10
    Great perfomance
  • 8
    Built by Facebook
  • 6
    Javascript
  • 5
    Speed
  • 5
    TypeScript support
  • 4
    Awesome
  • 4
    Easy to start
  • 4
    Feels like the 90s
  • 4
    Scalable
  • 3
    Hooks
  • 3
    Fancy third party tools
  • 3
    Server side views
  • 3
    Functional
  • 2
    Simple
  • 2
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 2
    Server Side Rendering
  • 2
    Cross-platform
  • 2
    SSR
  • 2
    Fast evolving
  • 2
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 2
    Rich ecosystem
  • 2
    Has functional components
  • 2
    Has arrow functions
  • 2
    Strong Community
  • 2
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 2
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 2
    Excellent Documentation
  • 2
    Super easy
  • 2
    Props
  • 2
    Scales super well
  • 2
    Just the View of MVC
  • 1
    Www
  • 1
    Start simple
  • 1
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 1
    Obama
  • 1
    Fragments
  • 1
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 1
    Sharable
  • 1
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 1
    Permissively-licensed
  • 1
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 1
    Allows creating single page applications
CONS OF REACT
  • 33
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 21
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 20
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 6
    JSX
  • 6
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 1
    One-way binding only
  • 1
    State consistency with backend neglected

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 1.5M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

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Johnny Bell
Software Engineer at Weedmaps · | 26 upvotes · 387.4K views
Shared insights
on
Vue.js
React

I've used both Vue.js and React and I would stick with React. I know that Vue.js seems easier to write and its much faster to pick up however as you mentioned above React has way more ready made components you can just plugin, and the community for React is very big.

It might be a bit more of a steep learning curve for your friend to learn React over Vue.js but I think in the long run its the better option.

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PureScript logo

PureScript

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51
6
A strongly-typed language that compiles to Javascript
44
51
+ 1
6
PROS OF PURESCRIPT
  • 4
    Purely functional
  • 2
    Great FFI to JavaScript
  • 0
    More Haskell-ish than Haskell
CONS OF PURESCRIPT
  • 1
    Have Some Bugs

related PureScript posts

ReasonML logo

ReasonML

65
72
9
A friendly programming language for JavaScript and OCaml
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72
+ 1
9
PROS OF REASONML
  • 4
    Pattern Matching
  • 3
    Type System
  • 1
    Fun
  • 1
    React
CONS OF REASONML
  • 1
    Bindings

related ReasonML posts

Haskell logo

Haskell

885
933
487
An advanced purely-functional programming language
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933
+ 1
487
PROS OF HASKELL
  • 83
    Purely-functional programming
  • 64
    Statically typed
  • 57
    Type-safe
  • 38
    Open source
  • 37
    Great community
  • 29
    Composable
  • 29
    Built-in concurrency
  • 28
    Built-in parallelism
  • 22
    Referentially transparent
  • 18
    Generics
  • 13
    Intellectual satisfaction
  • 13
    Type inference
  • 11
    If it compiles, it's correct
  • 7
    Monads
  • 7
    Flexible
  • 4
    Great type system
  • 4
    Proposition testing with QuickCheck
  • 3
    One of the most powerful languages *(see blub paradox)*
  • 2
    Highly expressive, type-safe, fast development time
  • 2
    Kind system
  • 2
    Purely-functional Programming
  • 2
    Pattern matching and completeness checking
  • 2
    Better type-safe than sorry
  • 2
    Type classes
  • 2
    Best in class thinking tool
  • 2
    Great maintainability of the code
  • 2
    Fun
  • 2
    Reliable
  • 0
    Orthogonality
  • 0
    Predictable
CONS OF HASKELL
  • 6
    Error messages can be very confusing
  • 6
    Too much distraction in language extensions
  • 4
    Libraries have poor documentation
  • 3
    No best practices
  • 3
    No good ABI
  • 2
    Poor packaging for apps written in it for Linux distros
  • 2
    Sometimes performance is unpredictable
  • 1
    Slow compilation

related Haskell posts

Vadim Bakaev
Shared insights
on
Haskell
Scala

Why I am using Haskell in my free time?

I have 3 reasons for it. I am looking for:

Fun.

Improve functional programming skill.

Improve problem-solving skill.

Laziness and mathematical abstractions behind Haskell makes it a wonderful language.

It is Pure functional, it helps me to write better Scala code.

Highly expressive language gives elegant ways to solve coding puzzle.

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Svelte logo

Svelte

558
665
380
A UI framework that compiles into tiny standalone JavaScript modules
558
665
+ 1
380
PROS OF SVELTE
  • 36
    Performance
  • 30
    Reactivity
  • 28
    Javascript compiler (do that browsers don't have to)
  • 27
    Components
  • 25
    Simplicity
  • 23
    Real Reactivity
  • 23
    Lightweight
  • 21
    Fast as vanilajs
  • 19
    Near to no learning curve
  • 16
    Compiler based
  • 15
    Use existing js libraries
  • 15
    All in one
  • 14
    Scalable
  • 12
    Very easy for beginners
  • 12
    SSR
  • 12
    Composable
  • 10
    No runtime overhead
  • 10
    Ease of use
  • 9
    Built in store
  • 6
    Typescript
  • 5
    Templates
  • 5
    Best Developer Experience
  • 5
    Start with pure html + css
  • 2
    Speed
CONS OF SVELTE
  • 2
    Complex
  • 2
    Learning Curve
  • 2
    Hard to learn
  • 2
    Event Listener Overload
  • 1
    Little to no libraries

related Svelte posts

Sarmad Chaudhary
Founder & CEO at Ebiz Ltd. · | 9 upvotes · 366.5K views

Hi there!

I just want to have a simple poll/vote...

If you guys need a UI/Component Library for React, Vue.js, or AngularJS, which type of library would you prefer between:

1 ) A single maintained cross-framework library that is 100% compatible and can be integrated with any popular framework like Vue, React, Angular 2, Svelte, etc.

2) A native framework-specific library developed to work only on target framework like ElementUI for Vue, Ant Design for React.

Your advice would help a lot! Thanks in advance :)

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Elixir logo

Elixir

2.5K
2.5K
1.2K
Dynamic, functional language designed for building scalable and maintainable applications
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PROS OF ELIXIR
  • 163
    Concurrency
  • 151
    Functional
  • 127
    Erlang vm
  • 109
    Great documentation
  • 102
    Great tooling
  • 82
    Immutable data structures
  • 77
    Open source
  • 74
    Pattern-matching
  • 61
    Easy to get started
  • 57
    Actor library
  • 28
    Functional with a neat syntax
  • 28
    Ruby inspired
  • 24
    Homoiconic
  • 22
    Erlang evolved
  • 20
    Beauty of Ruby, Speed of Erlang/C
  • 17
    Fault Tolerant
  • 13
    Simple
  • 13
    High Performance
  • 10
    Good lang
  • 9
    Stinkin' fast, no memory leaks, easy on the eyes
  • 9
    Doc as first class citizen
  • 8
    Pipe Operator
  • 7
    Resilient to failure
  • 6
    Fun to write
  • 5
    GenServer takes the guesswork out of background work
  • 5
    OTP
  • 4
    Not Swift
  • 4
    Pattern matching
  • 4
    Idempotence
  • 4
    Fast, Concurrent with clean error messages
  • 2
    Error isolation
  • 1
    Dynamic Typing
CONS OF ELIXIR
  • 11
    Fewer jobs for Elixir experts
  • 7
    Smaller userbase than other mainstream languages
  • 5
    Elixir's dot notation less readable ("object": 1st arg)
  • 3
    Dynamic typing
  • 1
    Not a lot of learning books available

related Elixir posts

Kamil Kowalski
Lead Architect at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 944.5K views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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Sebastian Gębski

Another major decision was to adopt Elixir and Phoenix Framework - the DX (Developer eXperience) is pretty similar to what we know from RoR, but this tech is running on the top of rock-solid Erlang platform which is powering planet-scale telecom solutions for 20+ years. So we're getting pretty much the best from both worlds: minimum friction & smart conventions that eliminate the excessive boilerplate AND highly concurrent EVM (Erlang's Virtual Machine) that makes all the scalability problems vanish. The transition was very smooth - none of Ruby developers we had decided to leave because of Elixir. What is more, we kept recruiting Ruby developers w/o any requirement regarding Elixir proficiency & we still were able to educate them internally in almost no time. Obviously Elixir comes with some more tools in the stack: Credo , Hex , AppSignal (required to properly monitor BEAM apps).

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JavaScript logo

JavaScript

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148.1K
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Lightweight, interpreted, object-oriented language with first-class functions
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PROS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 1.6K
    Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 1.5K
    It's everywhere
  • 1.1K
    Lots of great frameworks
  • 884
    Fast
  • 733
    Light weight
  • 412
    Flexible
  • 378
    You can't get a device today that doesn't run js
  • 280
    Non-blocking i/o
  • 230
    Ubiquitousness
  • 185
    Expressive
  • 49
    Extended functionality to web pages
  • 42
    Relatively easy language
  • 40
    Executed on the client side
  • 24
    Relatively fast to the end user
  • 20
    Pure Javascript
  • 15
    Functional programming
  • 9
    Async
  • 7
    Setup is easy
  • 6
    JavaScript is the New PHP
  • 6
    Full-stack
  • 6
    Because I love functions
  • 5
    Like it or not, JS is part of the web standard
  • 5
    Future Language of The Web
  • 5
    Can be used in backend, frontend and DB
  • 5
    Its everywhere
  • 5
    Expansive community
  • 4
    Everyone use it
  • 4
    Supports lambdas and closures
  • 4
    Love-hate relationship
  • 4
    Popularized Class-Less Architecture & Lambdas
  • 4
    Evolution of C
  • 4
    For the good parts
  • 4
    Easy to hire developers
  • 3
    Only Programming language on browser
  • 3
    Nice
  • 3
    Easy to make something
  • 3
    Promise relationship
  • 3
    Scope manipulation
  • 3
    Hard not to use
  • 3
    Client processing
  • 3
    Client side JS uses the visitors CPU to save Server Res
  • 3
    Stockholm Syndrome
  • 3
    Clojurescript
  • 3
    Easy
  • 3
    Can be used both as frontend and backend as well
  • 3
    Most Popular Language in the World
  • 3
    Versitile
  • 3
    No need to use PHP
  • 3
    Photoshop has 3 JS runtimes built in
  • 3
    Function expressions are useful for callbacks
  • 3
    Can be used on frontend/backend/Mobile/create PRO Ui
  • 3
    Because it is so simple and lightweight
  • 3
    Its fun and fast
  • 3
    It let's me use Babel & Typescript
  • 3
    What to add
  • 3
    1.6K Can be used on frontend/backend
  • 3
    Powerful
  • 3
    It's fun
  • 3
    Everywhere
  • 3
    Agile, packages simple to use
  • 1
    JavaScript j.s
  • 1
    Acoperișul 0757604335
CONS OF JAVASCRIPT
  • 21
    A constant moving target, too much churn
  • 20
    Horribly inconsistent
  • 14
    Javascript is the New PHP
  • 8
    No ability to monitor memory utilitization
  • 6
    Shows Zero output in case of ANY error
  • 5
    Can be ugly
  • 4
    Thinks strange results are better than errors
  • 2
    No GitHub
  • 1
    Slow

related JavaScript posts

Zach Holman

Oof. I have truly hated JavaScript for a long time. Like, for over twenty years now. Like, since the Clinton administration. It's always been a nightmare to deal with all of the aspects of that silly language.

But wowza, things have changed. Tooling is just way, way better. I'm primarily web-oriented, and using React and Apollo together the past few years really opened my eyes to building rich apps. And I deeply apologize for using the phrase rich apps; I don't think I've ever said such Enterprisey words before.

But yeah, things are different now. I still love Rails, and still use it for a lot of apps I build. But it's that silly rich apps phrase that's the problem. Users have way more comprehensive expectations than they did even five years ago, and the JS community does a good job at building tools and tech that tackle the problems of making heavy, complicated UI and frontend work.

Obviously there's a lot of things happening here, so just saying "JavaScript isn't terrible" might encompass a huge amount of libraries and frameworks. But if you're like me, yeah, give things another shot- I'm somehow not hating on JavaScript anymore and... gulp... I kinda love it.

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Conor Myhrvold
Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 38 upvotes · 3.7M views

How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

(GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

Bindings/Operator: Python Java Node.js Go C++ Kubernetes JavaScript OpenShift C# Apache Spark

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