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Elm Alternatives

Explore the pros & cons of Elm and its alternatives. Learn about popular competitors like TypeScript, React, and PureScript
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What is Elm and what are its top alternatives?

Writing HTML apps is super easy with elm-lang/html. Not only does it render extremely fast, it also quietly guides you towards well-architected code.
Elm is a tool in the Package Managers category of a tech stack.
Elm is an open source tool with GitHub stars and GitHub forks. Here’s a link to Elm's open source repository on GitHub

Top Alternatives to Elm

  • TypeScript
    TypeScript

    TypeScript is a language for application-scale JavaScript development. It's a typed superset of JavaScript that compiles to plain JavaScript. ...

  • React
    React

    Lots of people use React as the V in MVC. Since React makes no assumptions about the rest of your technology stack, it's easy to try it out on a small feature in an existing project. ...

  • PureScript
    PureScript

    A small strongly typed programming language with expressive types that compiles to JavaScript, written in and inspired by Haskell. ...

  • ReasonML
    ReasonML

    It lets you write simple, fast and quality type safe code while leveraging both the JavaScript & OCaml ecosystems.It is powerful, safe type inference means you rarely have to annotate types, but everything gets checked for you. ...

  • Haskell
    Haskell

    It is a general purpose language that can be used in any domain and use case, it is ideally suited for proprietary business logic and data analysis, fast prototyping and enhancing existing software environments with correct code, performance and scalability. ...

  • Svelte
    Svelte

    If you've ever built a JavaScript application, the chances are you've encountered – or at least heard of – frameworks like React, Angular, Vue and Ractive. Like Svelte, these tools all share a goal of making it easy to build slick interactive user interfaces. Rather than interpreting your application code at run time, your app is converted into ideal JavaScript at build time. That means you don't pay the performance cost of the framework's abstractions, or incur a penalty when your app first loads. ...

  • Elixir
    Elixir

    Elixir leverages the Erlang VM, known for running low-latency, distributed and fault-tolerant systems, while also being successfully used in web development and the embedded software domain. ...

  • RubyGems
    RubyGems

    It is a package manager for the Ruby programming language that provides a standard format for distributing Ruby programs and libraries, a tool designed to easily manage the installation of gems, and a server for distributing them. ...

Elm alternatives & related posts

TypeScript logo

TypeScript

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70.1K
502
A superset of JavaScript that compiles to clean JavaScript output
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PROS OF TYPESCRIPT
  • 174
    More intuitive and type safe javascript
  • 106
    Type safe
  • 80
    JavaScript superset
  • 48
    The best AltJS ever
  • 27
    Best AltJS for BackEnd
  • 15
    Powerful type system, including generics & JS features
  • 11
    Compile time errors
  • 11
    Nice and seamless hybrid of static and dynamic typing
  • 10
    Aligned with ES development for compatibility
  • 7
    Angular
  • 7
    Structural, rather than nominal, subtyping
  • 5
    Starts and ends with JavaScript
  • 1
    Garbage collection
CONS OF TYPESCRIPT
  • 5
    Code may look heavy and confusing
  • 4
    Hype

related TypeScript posts

Yshay Yaacobi

Our first experience with .NET core was when we developed our OSS feature management platform - Tweek (https://github.com/soluto/tweek). We wanted to create a solution that is able to run anywhere (super important for OSS), has excellent performance characteristics and can fit in a multi-container architecture. We decided to implement our rule engine processor in F# , our main service was implemented in C# and other components were built using JavaScript / TypeScript and Go.

Visual Studio Code worked really well for us as well, it worked well with all our polyglot services and the .Net core integration had great cross-platform developer experience (to be fair, F# was a bit trickier) - actually, each of our team members used a different OS (Ubuntu, macos, windows). Our production deployment ran for a time on Docker Swarm until we've decided to adopt Kubernetes with almost seamless migration process.

After our positive experience of running .Net core workloads in containers and developing Tweek's .Net services on non-windows machines, C# had gained back some of its popularity (originally lost to Node.js), and other teams have been using it for developing microservices, k8s sidecars (like https://github.com/Soluto/airbag), cli tools, serverless functions and other projects...

See more
Adebayo Akinlaja
Engineering Manager at Andela · | 30 upvotes · 3.3M views

I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

See more
React logo

React

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138.8K
4.1K
A JavaScript library for building user interfaces
167.8K
138.8K
+ 1
4.1K
PROS OF REACT
  • 830
    Components
  • 672
    Virtual dom
  • 578
    Performance
  • 507
    Simplicity
  • 442
    Composable
  • 186
    Data flow
  • 166
    Declarative
  • 128
    Isn't an mvc framework
  • 120
    Reactive updates
  • 115
    Explicit app state
  • 50
    JSX
  • 29
    Learn once, write everywhere
  • 22
    Easy to Use
  • 21
    Uni-directional data flow
  • 17
    Works great with Flux Architecture
  • 11
    Great perfomance
  • 10
    Javascript
  • 9
    Built by Facebook
  • 8
    TypeScript support
  • 6
    Speed
  • 6
    Server Side Rendering
  • 5
    Feels like the 90s
  • 5
    Excellent Documentation
  • 5
    Props
  • 5
    Functional
  • 5
    Easy as Lego
  • 5
    Closer to standard JavaScript and HTML than others
  • 5
    Cross-platform
  • 5
    Easy to start
  • 5
    Hooks
  • 5
    Awesome
  • 5
    Scalable
  • 4
    Super easy
  • 4
    Allows creating single page applications
  • 4
    Server side views
  • 4
    Sdfsdfsdf
  • 4
    Start simple
  • 4
    Strong Community
  • 4
    Fancy third party tools
  • 4
    Scales super well
  • 3
    Has arrow functions
  • 3
    Beautiful and Neat Component Management
  • 3
    Just the View of MVC
  • 3
    Simple, easy to reason about and makes you productive
  • 3
    Fast evolving
  • 3
    SSR
  • 3
    Great migration pathway for older systems
  • 3
    Rich ecosystem
  • 3
    Simple
  • 3
    Has functional components
  • 3
    Every decision architecture wise makes sense
  • 3
    Very gentle learning curve
  • 2
    Split your UI into components with one true state
  • 2
    Recharts
  • 2
    Permissively-licensed
  • 2
    Fragments
  • 2
    Sharable
  • 2
    Image upload
  • 2
    HTML-like
  • 1
    React hooks
  • 1
    Datatables
CONS OF REACT
  • 40
    Requires discipline to keep architecture organized
  • 29
    No predefined way to structure your app
  • 28
    Need to be familiar with lots of third party packages
  • 13
    JSX
  • 10
    Not enterprise friendly
  • 6
    One-way binding only
  • 3
    State consistency with backend neglected
  • 3
    Bad Documentation
  • 2
    Error boundary is needed
  • 2
    Paradigms change too fast

related React posts

Vaibhav Taunk
Team Lead at Technovert · | 31 upvotes · 3.6M views

I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

See more
Adebayo Akinlaja
Engineering Manager at Andela · | 30 upvotes · 3.3M views

I picked up an idea to develop and it was no brainer I had to go with React for the frontend. I was faced with challenges when it came to what component framework to use. I had worked extensively with Material-UI but I needed something different that would offer me wider range of well customized components (I became pretty slow at styling). I brought in Evergreen after several sampling and reads online but again, after several prototype development against Evergreen—since I was using TypeScript and I had to import custom Type, it felt exhaustive. After I validated Evergreen with the designs of the idea I was developing, I also noticed I might have to do a lot of styling. I later stumbled on Material Kit, the one specifically made for React . It was promising with beautifully crafted components, most of which fits into the designs pages I had on ground.

A major problem of Material Kit for me is it isn't written in TypeScript and there isn't any plans to support its TypeScript version. I rolled up my sleeve and started converting their components to TypeScript and if you'll ask me, I am still on it.

In summary, I used the Create React App with TypeScript support and I am spending some time converting Material Kit to TypeScript before I start developing against it. All of these components are going to be hosted on Bit.

If you feel I am crazy or I have gotten something wrong, I'll be willing to listen to your opinion. Also, if you want to have a share of whatever TypeScript version of Material Kit I end up coming up with, let me know.

See more
PureScript logo

PureScript

88
85
18
A strongly-typed language that compiles to Javascript
88
85
+ 1
18
PROS OF PURESCRIPT
  • 6
    Purely functional
  • 4
    Great FFI to JavaScript
  • 2
    The best type system
  • 2
    Alternate backends
  • 1
    Pursuit
  • 1
    More Haskell-ish than Haskell
  • 1
    Coherent type classes
  • 1
    Libraries
CONS OF PURESCRIPT
  • 1
    No JSX/Template
  • 1
    Have Some Bugs
  • 1
    Not so fancy error reporting

related PureScript posts

ReasonML logo

ReasonML

73
90
8
A friendly programming language for JavaScript and OCaml
73
90
+ 1
8
PROS OF REASONML
  • 4
    Pattern Matching
  • 3
    Type System
  • 1
    React
CONS OF REASONML
  • 1
    Bindings

related ReasonML posts

Haskell logo

Haskell

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An advanced purely-functional programming language
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PROS OF HASKELL
  • 90
    Purely-functional programming
  • 66
    Statically typed
  • 59
    Type-safe
  • 39
    Open source
  • 38
    Great community
  • 31
    Built-in concurrency
  • 30
    Built-in parallelism
  • 30
    Composable
  • 24
    Referentially transparent
  • 20
    Generics
  • 15
    Type inference
  • 15
    Intellectual satisfaction
  • 12
    If it compiles, it's correct
  • 8
    Flexible
  • 8
    Monads
  • 5
    Great type system
  • 4
    Proposition testing with QuickCheck
  • 4
    One of the most powerful languages *(see blub paradox)*
  • 4
    Purely-functional Programming
  • 3
    Highly expressive, type-safe, fast development time
  • 3
    Pattern matching and completeness checking
  • 3
    Great maintainability of the code
  • 3
    Fun
  • 3
    Reliable
  • 2
    Best in class thinking tool
  • 2
    Kind system
  • 2
    Better type-safe than sorry
  • 2
    Type classes
  • 1
    Predictable
  • 1
    Orthogonality
CONS OF HASKELL
  • 9
    Too much distraction in language extensions
  • 8
    Error messages can be very confusing
  • 5
    Libraries have poor documentation
  • 3
    No good ABI
  • 3
    No best practices
  • 2
    Poor packaging for apps written in it for Linux distros
  • 2
    Sometimes performance is unpredictable
  • 1
    Slow compilation
  • 1
    Monads are hard to understand

related Haskell posts

Shared insights
on
HaskellHaskellScalaScala

Why I am using Haskell in my free time?

I have 3 reasons for it. I am looking for:

Fun.

Improve functional programming skill.

Improve problem-solving skill.

Laziness and mathematical abstractions behind Haskell makes it a wonderful language.

It is Pure functional, it helps me to write better Scala code.

Highly expressive language gives elegant ways to solve coding puzzle.

See more
Svelte logo

Svelte

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A UI framework that compiles into tiny standalone JavaScript modules
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PROS OF SVELTE
  • 56
    Performance
  • 39
    Reactivity
  • 34
    Components
  • 34
    Simplicity
  • 34
    Javascript compiler (do that browsers don't have to)
  • 30
    Lightweight
  • 28
    Near to no learning curve
  • 26
    Fast as vanilajs
  • 26
    Real Reactivity
  • 22
    All in one
  • 18
    Compiler based
  • 18
    Use existing js libraries
  • 16
    SSR
  • 16
    Very easy for beginners
  • 16
    Scalable
  • 13
    Composable
  • 12
    Ease of use
  • 12
    No runtime overhead
  • 10
    Built in store
  • 9
    Typescript
  • 7
    Best Developer Experience
  • 7
    Start with pure html + css
  • 6
    Templates
  • 4
    Speed
CONS OF SVELTE
  • 3
    Event Listener Overload
  • 2
    Little to no libraries
  • 2
    Complex
  • 2
    Learning Curve
  • 2
    Hard to learn

related Svelte posts

Sarmad Chaudhary
Founder & CEO at Ebiz Ltd. · | 9 upvotes · 1.3M views

Hi there!

I just want to have a simple poll/vote...

If you guys need a UI/Component Library for React, Vue.js, or AngularJS, which type of library would you prefer between:

1 ) A single maintained cross-framework library that is 100% compatible and can be integrated with any popular framework like Vue, React, Angular 2, Svelte, etc.

2) A native framework-specific library developed to work only on target framework like ElementUI for Vue, Ant Design for React.

Your advice would help a lot! Thanks in advance :)

See more
Aleksander Jess
Marketer at ITMAGINATION · | 5 upvotes · 15K views

React is pretty much the standard nowadays. Companies of all sizes released integrations: the ecommerce ones too. I will bring up Shopify , that released their Hydrogen

There are (arguably) much better tools than React, you are right. There's Svelte (SvelteKit) , Solid.js, and more. They all suffer from morer or less the same issue, though (when it comes to SEO, at least).

The problem is not with React , it's with SPAs. It used to be (and still is sometimes) that search engines' bots wouldn't run JavaScript , meaning they wouldn't see anything on the page. Nowadays, it is said they do load it, but that takes longer than loading the HTML, which is what they are mostly interested in.

So what do you do? You use a static site generator, a prerenderer, a static site, or a server-side rendered site. Next.js does both SSG & SSR, which is why your Next.js sites should rank higher than the plain React sites (assuming the same content & structure).

I hope this answers your question.

See more
Elixir logo

Elixir

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3.2K
1.3K
Dynamic, functional language designed for building scalable and maintainable applications
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PROS OF ELIXIR
  • 172
    Concurrency
  • 161
    Functional
  • 133
    Erlang vm
  • 112
    Great documentation
  • 105
    Great tooling
  • 86
    Immutable data structures
  • 81
    Open source
  • 77
    Pattern-matching
  • 62
    Easy to get started
  • 59
    Actor library
  • 32
    Functional with a neat syntax
  • 29
    Ruby inspired
  • 25
    Erlang evolved
  • 24
    Homoiconic
  • 22
    Beauty of Ruby, Speed of Erlang/C
  • 17
    Fault Tolerant
  • 14
    Simple
  • 13
    High Performance
  • 11
    Pipe Operator
  • 11
    Good lang
  • 11
    Doc as first class citizen
  • 9
    Stinkin' fast, no memory leaks, easy on the eyes
  • 9
    Fun to write
  • 8
    Resilient to failure
  • 8
    OTP
  • 6
    GenServer takes the guesswork out of background work
  • 4
    Not Swift
  • 4
    Pattern matching
  • 4
    Idempotence
  • 4
    Fast, Concurrent with clean error messages
  • 3
    Easy to use
  • 2
    Dynamic Typing
  • 2
    Error isolation
CONS OF ELIXIR
  • 11
    Fewer jobs for Elixir experts
  • 7
    Smaller userbase than other mainstream languages
  • 5
    Elixir's dot notation less readable ("object": 1st arg)
  • 4
    Dynamic typing
  • 1
    Difficult to understand
  • 1
    Not a lot of learning books available

related Elixir posts

Kamil Kowalski
Lead Architect at Fresha · | 28 upvotes · 3.8M views

When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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Sebastian Gębski

Another major decision was to adopt Elixir and Phoenix Framework - the DX (Developer eXperience) is pretty similar to what we know from RoR, but this tech is running on the top of rock-solid Erlang platform which is powering planet-scale telecom solutions for 20+ years. So we're getting pretty much the best from both worlds: minimum friction & smart conventions that eliminate the excessive boilerplate AND highly concurrent EVM (Erlang's Virtual Machine) that makes all the scalability problems vanish. The transition was very smooth - none of Ruby developers we had decided to leave because of Elixir. What is more, we kept recruiting Ruby developers w/o any requirement regarding Elixir proficiency & we still were able to educate them internally in almost no time. Obviously Elixir comes with some more tools in the stack: Credo , Hex , AppSignal (required to properly monitor BEAM apps).

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RubyGems logo

RubyGems

6.7K
6
0
Easily download, install, and use ruby software packages on your system
6.7K
6
+ 1
0
PROS OF RUBYGEMS
    Be the first to leave a pro
    CONS OF RUBYGEMS
      Be the first to leave a con

      related RubyGems posts