Alternatives to Fastly logo

Alternatives to Fastly

CloudFlare, Akamai, Netlify, Varnish, and StackPath are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Fastly.
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What is Fastly and what are its top alternatives?

Fastly's real-time content delivery network gives you total control over your content, unprecedented access to performance analytics, and the ability to instantly update content in 150 milliseconds.
Fastly is a tool in the Content Delivery Network category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to Fastly

  • CloudFlare

    CloudFlare

    Cloudflare speeds up and protects millions of websites, APIs, SaaS services, and other properties connected to the Internet. ...

  • Akamai

    Akamai

    If you've ever shopped online, downloaded music, watched a web video or connected to work remotely, you've probably used Akamai's cloud platform. Akamai helps businesses connect the hyperconnected, empowering them to transform and reinvent their business online. We remove the complexities of technology, so you can focus on driving your business faster forward. ...

  • Netlify

    Netlify

    Netlify is smart enough to process your site and make sure all assets gets optimized and served with perfect caching-headers from a cookie-less domain. We make sure your HTML is served straight from our CDN edge nodes without any round-trip to our backend servers and are the only ones to give you instant cache invalidation when you push a new deploy. Netlify is also the only static hosting service with integrated continuous deployment. ...

  • Varnish

    Varnish

    Varnish Cache is a web application accelerator also known as a caching HTTP reverse proxy. You install it in front of any server that speaks HTTP and configure it to cache the contents. Varnish Cache is really, really fast. It typically speeds up delivery with a factor of 300 - 1000x, depending on your architecture. ...

  • StackPath

    StackPath

    Build your applications and services at the edge, with Edge Computing and Edge Services that give you high performance, full security, and total control. ...

  • Twilio

    Twilio

    Twilio offers developers a powerful API for phone services to make and receive phone calls, and send and receive text messages. Their product allows programmers to more easily integrate various communication methods into their software and programs. ...

  • Datadog

    Datadog

    Datadog is the leading service for cloud-scale monitoring. It is used by IT, operations, and development teams who build and operate applications that run on dynamic or hybrid cloud infrastructure. Start monitoring in minutes with Datadog! ...

  • Amazon CloudFront

    Amazon CloudFront

    Amazon CloudFront can be used to deliver your entire website, including dynamic, static, streaming, and interactive content using a global network of edge locations. Requests for your content are automatically routed to the nearest edge location, so content is delivered with the best possible performance. ...

Fastly alternatives & related posts

CloudFlare logo

CloudFlare

67.4K
15.2K
1.7K
The Web Performance & Security Company.
67.4K
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PROS OF CLOUDFLARE
  • 420
    Easy setup, great cdn
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    Free ssl
  • 196
    Easy setup
  • 184
    Security
  • 179
    Ssl
  • 94
    Great cdn
  • 76
    Optimizer
  • 69
    Simple
  • 43
    Great UI
  • 28
    Great js cdn
  • 11
    HTTP/2 Support
  • 11
    AutoMinify
  • 11
    Apps
  • 11
    DNS Analytics
  • 8
    Ipv6
  • 8
    Easy
  • 8
    Rocket Loader
  • 7
    IPv6 "One Click"
  • 6
    Free GeoIP
  • 6
    Fantastic CDN service
  • 6
    Nice DNS
  • 6
    SSHFP
  • 6
    Cheapest SSL
  • 6
    Amazing performance
  • 6
    API
  • 5
    Free and reliable, Faster then anyone else
  • 5
    SPDY
  • 5
    DNSSEC
  • 4
    Asynchronous resource loading
  • 4
    Ip
  • 3
    Easy Use
  • 3
    Ubuntu
  • 3
    Global Load Balancing
  • 3
    Performance
  • 1
    CDN
  • 1
    Maker
  • 1
    Support for SSHFP records
  • 1
    Mtn
CONS OF CLOUDFLARE
  • 1
    Expensive when you exceed their fair usage limits
  • 1
    No support for SSHFP records

related CloudFlare posts

Johnny Bell

When I first built my portfolio I used GitHub for the source control and deployed directly to Netlify on a push to master. This was a perfect setup, I didn't need any knowledge about #DevOps or anything, it was all just done for me.

One of the issues I had with Netlify was I wanted to gzip my JavaScript files, I had this setup in my #Webpack file, however Netlify didn't offer an easy way to set this.

Over the weekend I decided I wanted to know more about how #DevOps worked so I decided to switch from Netlify to Amazon S3. Instead of creating any #Git Webhooks I decided to use Buddy for my pipeline and to run commands. Buddy is a fantastic tool, very easy to setup builds, copying the files to my Amazon S3 bucket, then running some #AWS console commands to set the content-encoding of the JavaScript files. - Buddy is also free if you only have a few pipelines, so I didn't need to pay anything 馃馃徎.

When I made these changes I also wanted to monitor my code, and make sure I was keeping up with the best practices so I implemented Code Climate to look over my code and tell me where there code smells, issues, and other issues I've been super happy with it so far, on the free tier so its also free.

I did plan on using Amazon CloudFront for my SSL and cacheing, however it was overly complex to setup and it costs money. So I decided to go with the free tier of CloudFlare and it is amazing, best choice I've made for caching / SSL in a long time.

See more
Johnny Bell

I recently moved my portfolio to Amazon S3 and I needed a new way to cache and SSL my site as Amazon S3 does not come with this right out of the box. I tried Amazon CloudFront as I was already on Amazon S3 I thought this would be super easy and straight forward to setup... It was not, I was unable to get this working even though I followed all the online steps and even reached out for help to Amazon.

I'd used CloudFlare in the past, and thought let me see if I can set up CloudFlare on an Amazon S3 bucket. The setup for this was so basic and easy... I had it setup with caching and SSL within 5 minutes, and it was 100% free.

See more
Akamai logo

Akamai

1.9K
385
0
The leading platform for cloud, mobile, media and security across any device, anywhere.
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PROS OF AKAMAI
    Be the first to leave a pro
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      Netlify logo

      Netlify

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      PROS OF NETLIFY
      • 43
        Easy deploy
      • 41
        Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
      • 21
        Free SSL support
      • 21
        Super simple deploys
      • 15
        Easy Setup and Continous deployments
      • 9
        Free plan for personal websites
      • 9
        Faster than any other option in the market
      • 7
        Deploy previews
      • 6
        Free Open Source (Pro) plan
      • 4
        Easy to use and great support
      • 4
        Analytics
      • 4
        Great loop-in material on a blog
      • 3
        Great drag and drop functionality
      • 3
        Fastest static hosting and continuous deployments
      • 2
        Custom domains support
      • 1
        Canary Releases (Split Tests)
      • 1
        Tech oriented support
      • 1
        Supports static site generators
      CONS OF NETLIFY
      • 8
        It's expensive
      • 1
        Bandwidth limitation

      related Netlify posts

      Johnny Bell

      I was building a personal project that I needed to store items in a real time database. I am more comfortable with my Frontend skills than my backend so I didn't want to spend time building out anything in Ruby or Go.

      I stumbled on Firebase by #Google, and it was really all I needed. It had realtime data, an area for storing file uploads and best of all for the amount of data I needed it was free!

      I built out my application using tools I was familiar with, React for the framework, Redux.js to manage my state across components, and styled-components for the styling.

      Now as this was a project I was just working on in my free time for fun I didn't really want to pay for hosting. I did some research and I found Netlify. I had actually seen them at #ReactRally the year before and deployed a Gatsby site to Netlify already.

      Netlify was very easy to setup and link to my GitHub account you select a repo and pretty much with very little configuration you have a live site that will deploy every time you push to master.

      With the selection of these tools I was able to build out my application, connect it to a realtime database, and deploy to a live environment all with $0 spent.

      If you're looking to build out a small app I suggest giving these tools a go as you can get your idea out into the real world for absolutely no cost.

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      Stephen Gheysens
      Senior Solutions Engineer at Twilio | 14 upvotes 路 426.4K views

      Hi Otensia! I'd definitely recommend using the skills you've already got and building with JavaScript is a smart way to go these days. Most platform services have JavaScript/Node SDKs or NPM packages, many serverless platforms support Node in case you need to write any backend logic, and JavaScript is incredibly popular - meaning it will be easy to hire for, should you ever need to.

      My advice would be "don't reinvent the wheel". If you already have a skill set that will work well to solve the problem at hand, and you don't need it for any other projects, don't spend the time jumping into a new language. If you're looking for an excuse to learn something new, it would be better to invest that time in learning a new platform/tool that compliments your knowledge of JavaScript. For this project, I might recommend using Netlify, Vercel, or Google Firebase to quickly and easily deploy your web app. If you need to add user authentication, there are great examples out there for Firebase Authentication, Auth0, or even Magic (a newcomer on the Auth scene, but very user friendly). All of these services work very well with a JavaScript-based application.

      See more
      Varnish logo

      Varnish

      11.4K
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      359
      High-performance HTTP accelerator
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      PROS OF VARNISH
      • 103
        High-performance
      • 66
        Very Fast
      • 56
        Very Stable
      • 43
        Very Robust
      • 36
        HTTP reverse proxy
      • 20
        Open Source
      • 17
        Web application accelerator
      • 10
        Easy to config
      • 4
        Widely Used
      • 3
        Great community
      • 1
        Essential software for HTTP
      CONS OF VARNISH
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        Around the time of their Series A, Pinterest鈥檚 stack included Python and Django, with Tornado and Node.js as web servers. Memcached / Membase and Redis handled caching, with RabbitMQ handling queueing. Nginx, HAproxy and Varnish managed static-delivery and load-balancing, with persistent data storage handled by MySQL.

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        Tom Klein

        We're using Git through GitHub for public repositories and GitLab for our private repositories due to its easy to use features. Docker and Kubernetes are a must have for our highly scalable infrastructure complimented by HAProxy with Varnish in front of it. We are using a lot of npm and Visual Studio Code in our development sessions.

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        StackPath logo

        StackPath

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        Secure Edge Platform for Developers
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        PROS OF STACKPATH
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          Easy DO-like setup, but with edge performance
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          Supports the open source community
        CONS OF STACKPATH
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          Twilio logo

          Twilio

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            Powerful, simple, and well documented api
          • 87
            RESTful API
          • 66
            Clear pricing
          • 61
            Great sms services
          • 58
            Low cost of entry
          • 29
            Global SMS Gateway
          • 14
            Good value
          • 12
            Cloud IVR
          • 11
            Simple
          • 11
            Extremely simple to integrate with rails
          • 6
            Great for startups
          • 4
            SMS
          • 3
            Hassle free
          • 3
            Great developer program
          • 2
            Text me the app pages
          • 1
            New Features constantly rolling out
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            Many deployment options, from build from scratch to buy
          • 1
            Easy integration
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          Hi, Stackshare community, I plan to build an app where people can go live, and users can watch him, 1 to many, follow each other, and text.

          I am expecting a huge number of users to use the app in the first month (100k+)

          I made the UX/UI design, and my designer asked me to find a developer.

          I want your advice. What server is the best for video quality and fast text messages (like uplive, bigo)?

          Ex. Agora, Twilio, Amazon Chime, Aws, or fiberbass

          I need for both operating systems, (ios, android). Do you recommend Flutter?

          • I have AWS server in my country (Bahrain), and 80% of the audience are from the same area. Does it help in the video quality between the audience?

          Thank you for this helpful website.

          See more
          Shared insights
          on
          AgoraAgoraTwilioTwilioFirebaseFirebase

          Hello,

          My app will be a live streaming app (like tango, BigoLive) An app developer asked me to choose a tech stack and a team. expected auditions from (Bahrain-KSA-UAE-Kuwait-Oman)

          200 (broadcaster) at a time (minimum) (for 12 hours a day);10K watching the 200 (like 50 to 500) each live.

          What servers are the best to use and give smooth high quality like Bigolive? For live streaming, and texting, and everything.

          Which one is the best combination for my app? (Firebase, AWS, Twilio. Agora)

          Thanks

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          Datadog logo

          Datadog

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            Flexibility
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            Cost
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            Monitor almost everything
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            Easy to Analyze
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            Expensive
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            Simple, powerful, great for infra
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            Source control and bug tracking
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          Robert Zuber

          Our primary source of monitoring and alerting is Datadog. We鈥檝e got prebuilt dashboards for every scenario and integration with PagerDuty to manage routing any alerts. We鈥檝e definitely scaled past the point where managing dashboards is easy, but we haven鈥檛 had time to invest in using features like Anomaly Detection. We鈥檝e started using Honeycomb for some targeted debugging of complex production issues and we are liking what we鈥檝e seen. We capture any unhandled exceptions with Rollbar and, if we realize one will keep happening, we quickly convert the metrics to point back to Datadog, to keep Rollbar as clean as possible.

          We use Segment to consolidate all of our trackers, the most important of which goes to Amplitude to analyze user patterns. However, if we need a more consolidated view, we push all of our data to our own data warehouse running PostgreSQL; this is available for analytics and dashboard creation through Looker.

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          We are looking for a centralised monitoring solution for our application deployed on Amazon EKS. We would like to monitor using metrics from Kubernetes, AWS services (NeptuneDB, AWS Elastic Load Balancing (ELB), Amazon EBS, Amazon S3, etc) and application microservice's custom metrics.

          We are expected to use around 80 microservices (not replicas). I think a total of 200-250 microservices will be there in the system with 10-12 slave nodes.

          We tried Prometheus but it looks like maintenance is a big issue. We need to manage scaling, maintaining the storage, and dealing with multiple exporters and Grafana. I felt this itself needs few dedicated resources (at least 2-3 people) to manage. Not sure if I am thinking in the correct direction. Please confirm.

          You mentioned Datadog and Sysdig charges per host. Does it charge per slave node?

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          Amazon CloudFront logo

          Amazon CloudFront

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          935
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            Global
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            Cheap
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            Cost-effective
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            Reliable
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            One stop solution
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          Russel Werner
          Lead Engineer at StackShare | 30 upvotes 路 1.5M views

          StackShare Feed is built entirely with React, Glamorous, and Apollo. One of our objectives with the public launch of the Feed was to enable a Server-side rendered (SSR) experience for our organic search traffic. When you visit the StackShare Feed, and you aren't logged in, you are delivered the Trending feed experience. We use an in-house Node.js rendering microservice to generate this HTML. This microservice needs to run and serve requests independent of our Rails web app. Up until recently, we had a mono-repo with our Rails and React code living happily together and all served from the same web process. In order to deploy our SSR app into a Heroku environment, we needed to split out our front-end application into a separate repo in GitHub. The driving factor in this decision was mostly due to limitations imposed by Heroku specifically with how processes can't communicate with each other. A new SSR app was created in Heroku and linked directly to the frontend repo so it stays in-sync with changes.

          Related to this, we need a way to "deploy" our frontend changes to various server environments without building & releasing the entire Ruby application. We built a hybrid Amazon S3 Amazon CloudFront solution to host our Webpack bundles. A new CircleCI script builds the bundles and uploads them to S3. The final step in our rollout is to update some keys in Redis so our Rails app knows which bundles to serve. The result of these efforts were significant. Our frontend team now moves independently of our backend team, our build & release process takes only a few minutes, we are now using an edge CDN to serve JS assets, and we have pre-rendered React pages!

          #StackDecisionsLaunch #SSR #Microservices #FrontEndRepoSplit

          See more
          Julien DeFrance
          Principal Software Engineer at Tophatter | 16 upvotes 路 2.4M views

          Back in 2014, I was given an opportunity to re-architect SmartZip Analytics platform, and flagship product: SmartTargeting. This is a SaaS software helping real estate professionals keeping up with their prospects and leads in a given neighborhood/territory, finding out (thanks to predictive analytics) who's the most likely to list/sell their home, and running cross-channel marketing automation against them: direct mail, online ads, email... The company also does provide Data APIs to Enterprise customers.

          I had inherited years and years of technical debt and I knew things had to change radically. The first enabler to this was to make use of the cloud and go with AWS, so we would stop re-inventing the wheel, and build around managed/scalable services.

          For the SaaS product, we kept on working with Rails as this was what my team had the most knowledge in. We've however broken up the monolith and decoupled the front-end application from the backend thanks to the use of Rails API so we'd get independently scalable micro-services from now on.

          Our various applications could now be deployed using AWS Elastic Beanstalk so we wouldn't waste any more efforts writing time-consuming Capistrano deployment scripts for instance. Combined with Docker so our application would run within its own container, independently from the underlying host configuration.

          Storage-wise, we went with Amazon S3 and ditched any pre-existing local or network storage people used to deal with in our legacy systems. On the database side: Amazon RDS / MySQL initially. Ultimately migrated to Amazon RDS for Aurora / MySQL when it got released. Once again, here you need a managed service your cloud provider handles for you.

          Future improvements / technology decisions included:

          Caching: Amazon ElastiCache / Memcached CDN: Amazon CloudFront Systems Integration: Segment / Zapier Data-warehousing: Amazon Redshift BI: Amazon Quicksight / Superset Search: Elasticsearch / Amazon Elasticsearch Service / Algolia Monitoring: New Relic

          As our usage grows, patterns changed, and/or our business needs evolved, my role as Engineering Manager then Director of Engineering was also to ensure my team kept on learning and innovating, while delivering on business value.

          One of these innovations was to get ourselves into Serverless : Adopting AWS Lambda was a big step forward. At the time, only available for Node.js (Not Ruby ) but a great way to handle cost efficiency, unpredictable traffic, sudden bursts of traffic... Ultimately you want the whole chain of services involved in a call to be serverless, and that's when we've started leveraging Amazon DynamoDB on these projects so they'd be fully scalable.

          See more