Alternatives to JavaFX logo

Alternatives to JavaFX

GWT, Vaadin, Qt, JSF, and Electron are the most popular alternatives and competitors to JavaFX.
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What is JavaFX and what are its top alternatives?

It is a set of graphics and media packages that enables developers to design, create, test, debug, and deploy rich client applications that operate consistently across diverse platforms.
JavaFX is a tool in the Cross-Platform Desktop Development category of a tech stack.

Top Alternatives to JavaFX

JavaFX alternatives & related posts

GWT logo

GWT

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An open-source set of tools to create and maintain complex JavaScript front-end applications
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PROS OF GWT
    No pros available
    CONS OF GWT
      No cons available
      Vaadin logo

      Vaadin

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      Components and tools for building web apps in Java
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      JSF logo

      JSF

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      It is used for building component-based web interfaces
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      PROS OF JSF
        No pros available
        CONS OF JSF
          No cons available
          Electron logo

          Electron

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          Build cross platform desktop apps with web technologies. Formerly known as Atom Shell, made by GitHub.
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          related Electron posts

          Slack's new desktop application was launched for macOS. It was built using Electron for a faster, frameless look with a host of background improvements for a superior Slack experience. Instead of adopting a complete-in-box approach taken by other apps, Slack prefers a hybrid approach where some of the assets are loaded as part of the app, while others are made available remotely. Slack's original desktop app was written using the MacGap v1 framework using WebView to host web content within the native app frame. But it was difficult to upgrade with new features only available to Apple's WKWebView and moving to this view called for a total application rewrite.

          Electron brings together Chromium's rendering engine with the Node.js runtime and module system. The new desktop app is now based on an ES6 + async/await React application is currently being moved gradually to TypeScript. Electron functions on Chromium's multi-process model, with each Slack team signed into a separate process and memory space. It also helps prevent remote content to directly access desktop features using a feature called WebView Element which creates a fresh Chromium renderer process and assigns rendering of content for its hosting renderer. Additional security can be ensured by preventing Node.js modules from leaking into the API surface and watching out for APIs with file paths. Communication between processes on Electron is carried out via electron-remote, a pared-down, zippy version of Electron's remote module, which makes implementing the web apps UI much easier.

          See more

          The Slack desktop app was originally written us the MacGap framework, which used Apple’s WebView to host web content inside of a native app frame. As this approach continued to present product limitations, Slack decided to migrate the desktop app to Electron. Electron is a platform that combines the rendering engine from Chromium and the Node.js runtime and module system. The desktop app is written as a modern ES6 + async/await React application.

          For the desktop app, Slack takes a hybrid approach, wherein some of the assets ship as part of the app, but most of their assets and code are loaded remotely.

          See more

          related Java posts

          Conor Myhrvold
          Conor Myhrvold
          Tech Brand Mgr, Office of CTO at Uber · | 28 upvotes · 2.6M views

          How Uber developed the open source, end-to-end distributed tracing Jaeger , now a CNCF project:

          Distributed tracing is quickly becoming a must-have component in the tools that organizations use to monitor their complex, microservice-based architectures. At Uber, our open source distributed tracing system Jaeger saw large-scale internal adoption throughout 2016, integrated into hundreds of microservices and now recording thousands of traces every second.

          Here is the story of how we got here, from investigating off-the-shelf solutions like Zipkin, to why we switched from pull to push architecture, and how distributed tracing will continue to evolve:

          https://eng.uber.com/distributed-tracing/

          (GitHub Pages : https://www.jaegertracing.io/, GitHub: https://github.com/jaegertracing/jaeger)

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          Kamil Kowalski
          Kamil Kowalski
          Engineering Manager at Fresha · | 27 upvotes · 558.2K views

          When you think about test automation, it’s crucial to make it everyone’s responsibility (not just QA Engineers'). We started with Selenium and Java, but with our platform revolving around Ruby, Elixir and JavaScript, QA Engineers were left alone to automate tests. Cypress was the answer, as we could switch to JS and simply involve more people from day one. There's a downside too, as it meant testing on Chrome only, but that was "good enough" for us + if really needed we can always cover some specific cases in a different way.

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          Vaibhav Taunk
          Vaibhav Taunk
          Team Lead at Technovert · | 30 upvotes · 926.9K views

          I am starting to become a full-stack developer, by choosing and learning .NET Core for API Development, Angular CLI / React for UI Development, MongoDB for database, as it a NoSQL DB and Flutter / React Native for Mobile App Development. Using Postman, Markdown and Visual Studio Code for development.

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          Shared insights
          on
          Vue.jsVue.jsReactReact

          I find using Vue.js to be easier (more concise / less boilerplate) and more intuitive than writing React. However, there are a lot more readily available React components that I can just plug into my projects. I'm debating whether to use Vue.js or React for an upcoming project that I'm going to use to help teach a friend how to build an interactive frontend. Which would you recommend I use?

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          related Spring posts

          I've just finished my Masters degree and I am looking at routes into developing my Java knowledge.

          The University I studied at requested that all practical Java assignments were done in Java Swing and as such I have a strong understanding in that area of development. Looking at job prospects, many employers are now looking for Java Spring or Android developers.

          The plan is to move away from Java SE and skill up in Android development. I was planning on learning Spring Boot to gain exposure in web application development, however looking at StackShare, Django seems to be the more attractive choice for developers.

          Does anyone have any advice on which routes/stacks would be the most advisable to adopt. If Spring is not receiving as much exposure or support as Django, is it worth adding to my stack?

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          Spring Spring-Boot Java IntelliJ IDEA Slack

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