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Alternatives to Phabricator

Redmine, GitHub, Jira, GitLab, and Asana are the most popular alternatives and competitors to Phabricator.
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What is Phabricator and what are its top alternatives?

Phabricator is a collection of open source web applications that help software companies build better software.
Phabricator is a tool in the Code Review category of a tech stack.

Phabricator alternatives & related posts

related Redmine posts

Redmine
Redmine
Jira
Jira
Confluence
Confluence
Bamboo
Bamboo

We were using a hosted version of Redmine to track defects and user stories originally. We migrated to Jira.

Jira was an easy decision for a number of reasons:

  • It's much more "Scrum ready" straight out of the box
  • It's so much easier to keep a track of progress (I love the reporting)
  • It natively encourages you to adhere to Scrum/Agile/Kanban practices
  • Atlassian has a fantastic DevOps ecosystem when considering the likes of Confluence and Bamboo etc
  • So many integrations!
  • Its UI is so intuitive which makes it an absolute pleasure to use!

I know there are alot of other tools in this space but not even considering anything else at the moment. Love Jira!

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GitHub logo

GitHub

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Powerful collaboration, review, and code management for open source and private development projects
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related GitHub posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 17 upvotes · 156.3K views
atZulipZulip
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

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Ali Soueidan
Ali Soueidan
Creative Web Developer at Ali Soueidan · | 16 upvotes · 127.5K views
npm
npm
Vue.js
Vue.js
vuex
vuex
JavaScript
JavaScript
Pug
Pug
Sass
Sass
JSON
JSON
Git
Git
GitHub
GitHub
ES6
ES6
Asana
Asana
Adobe Illustrator
Adobe Illustrator
PHP
PHP
Babel
Babel

Application and Data: Since my personal website ( https://alisoueidan.com ) is a SPA I've chosen to use Vue.js, as a framework to create it. After a short skeptical phase I immediately felt in love with the single file component concept! I also used vuex for state management, which makes working with several components, which are communicating with each other even more fun and convenient to use. Of course, using Vue requires using JavaScript as well, since it is the basis of it.

For markup and style, I used Pug and Sass, since they’re the perfect match to me. I love the clean and strict syntax of both of them and even more that their structure is almost similar. Also, both of them come with an expanded functionality such as mixins, loops and so on related to their “siblings” (HTML and CSS). Both of them require nesting and prevent untidy code, which can be a huge advantage when working in teams. I used JSON to store data (since the data quantity on my website is moderate) – JSON works also good in combo with Pug, using for loops, based on the JSON Objects for example.

To send my contact form I used PHP, since sending emails using PHP is still relatively convenient, simple and easy done.

DevOps: Of course, I used Git to do my version management (which I even do in smaller projects like my website just have an additional backup of my code). On top of that I used GitHub since it now supports private repository for free accounts (which I am using for my own). I use Babel to use ES6 functionality such as arrow functions and so on, and still don’t losing cross browser compatibility.

Side note: I used npm for package management. 🎉

*Business Tools: * I use Asana to organize my project. This is a big advantage to me, even if I work alone, since “private” projects can get interrupted for some time. By using Asana I still know (even after month of not touching a project) what I’ve done, on which task I was at last working on and what still is to do. Working in Teams (for enterprise I’d take on Jira instead) of course Asana is a Tool which I really love to use as well. All the graphics on my website are SVG which I have created with Adobe Illustrator and adjusted within the SVG code or by using JavaScript or CSS (SASS).

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Jira

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related Jira posts

David Ritsema
David Ritsema
Frontend Architect at Herman Miller · | 10 upvotes · 52.4K views
atHerman MillerHerman Miller
Jira
Jira
Confluence
Confluence
GitHub
GitHub

We knew how we wanted to build our Design System, now it was time to choose the tools to get us there. The essence of Scrum is a small team of people. The team is highly flexible and adaptive. Perfect, so we'll work in 2 week sprints where each sprint can be a mix of new R&D stories, a presentation of decisions made, and showcasing key development milestones.

We are also able to run content stories in parallel, focusing development efforts around key areas of the site that our authors need first. Our stories would exist in a Jira backlog, documentation would be hosted in Confluence , and GitHub would host our codebase. If developers identify technical improvements during the sprint, they can be added as GitHub issues and transferred to Jira if we decide to represent them as stories for the Backlog. For Sprint Retrospectives, @groupmap proved to be a great way to include our remote members of the dev team.

This worked well for our team and allowed us to be flexible in what we wanted to build and how we wanted to build it. As we further defined our Backlog and estimated each story, we could accurately measure the team's capacity (velocity) and confidently estimate a launch date.

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Priit Kaasik
Priit Kaasik
Engineering Lead at Katana MRP · | 9 upvotes · 76.6K views
atKatana MRPKatana MRP
Slack
Slack
Jira
Jira
Intercom
Intercom
Confluence
Confluence
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
appear.in
appear.in
Papertrail
Papertrail
#RemoteTeam
#Agile
#CustomerSupportChat
#Notes
#SourceCode
#Logging
#Release
#InProductCommunication
#ContinuousDelivery
#Alerts
#Documentation
#Requirements

As a new company we could early adopt and bet on #RemoteTeam setup without cultural baggage derailing us. Our building blocks for developing remote working culture are:

  • Hiring people who are self sufficient, self-disciplined and excel at video and written communication to work remotely
  • Set up periodic ceremonies ( #DailyStandup, #Grooming, Release calls and chats etc) to keep the company rhythm / heartbeat going across remote cells
  • Regularly train your leaders to take into account remote working aspects of organizing f2f calls, events, meetups, parties etc. when communicating and organizing workflows
  • And last, but not least - select the right tools to support effective communication and collaboration:
  1. All feeds and conversations come together in Slack
  2. #Agile workflows in Jira
  3. InProductCommunication and #CustomerSupportChat in Intercom
  4. #Notes, #Documentation and #Requirements in Confluence
  5. #SourceCode and ContinuousDelivery in Bitbucket
  6. Persistent video streams between locations, demos, meetings run on appear.in
  7. #Logging and Alerts in Papertrail
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related GitLab posts

Tim Abbott
Tim Abbott
Founder at Zulip · | 17 upvotes · 156.3K views
atZulipZulip
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab
GitLab

I have mixed feelings on GitHub as a product and our use of it for the Zulip open source project. On the one hand, I do feel that being on GitHub helps people discover Zulip, because we have enough stars (etc.) that we rank highly among projects on the platform. and there is a definite benefit for lowering barriers to contribution (which is important to us) that GitHub has such a dominant position in terms of what everyone has accounts with.

But even ignoring how one might feel about their new corporate owner (MicroSoft), in a lot of ways GitHub is a bad product for open source projects. Years after the "Dear GitHub" letter, there are still basic gaps in its issue tracker:

  • You can't give someone permission to label/categorize issues without full write access to a project (including ability to merge things to master, post releases, etc.).
  • You can't let anyone with a GitHub account self-assign issues to themselves.
  • Many more similar issues.

It's embarrassing, because I've talked to GitHub product managers at various open source events about these things for 3 years, and they always agree the thing is important, but then nothing ever improves in the Issues product. Maybe the new management at MicroSoft will fix their product management situation, but if not, I imagine we'll eventually do the migration to GitLab.

We have a custom bot project, http://github.com/zulip/zulipbot, to deal with some of these issues where possible, and every other large project we talk to does the same thing, more or less.

See more
Michael Kelly
Michael Kelly
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 14 upvotes · 191.3K views
atACK FoundryACK Foundry
GitLab
GitLab
GitHub
GitHub
GitLab CI
GitLab CI
GitLab Pages
GitLab Pages
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
#OpenSourceCloud

I use GitLab when building side-projects and MVPs. The interface and interactions are close enough to those of GitHub to prevent cognitive switching costs between professional and personal projects hosted on different services.

GitLab also provides a suite of tools including issue/project management, CI/CD with GitLab CI, and validation/landing pages with GitLab Pages. With everything in one place, on an #OpenSourceCloud GitLab makes it easy for me to manage much larger projects on my own, than would be possible with other solutions or tools.

It's petty I know, but I can also read the GitLab code diffs far more easily than diffs on GitHub or Bitbucket...they just look better in my opinion.

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related Asana posts

Radu Cioplea
Radu Cioplea
Trello
Trello
Basecamp
Basecamp
Asana
Asana
Jira
Jira
#Kanban

There are lots of project management tools available nowadays. The choice ended up between Trello and Basecamp. Asana , JIRA and monday.com got a fair review but they didn't make it to the final list for several reasons (either way to complex or some UX issues or just too many options - good in some cases but not a good fit in this case).

Between Basecamp and Trello the battle was between ease of use and price. Basecamp packs a great set of features and if you are ready to move to an all in one solution: chat, file storage, and a PM tool, then @basecanp is by far the right choice. But since all the features are within one package that cannot be customized, moving to Basecamp but only using a part of the tool feels.. well.. not right. On the other hand Trello has the #kanban format that is just too easy to use and the price point for small and midsize team that no one can beat.

At the end, all solutions have a good fit in some cases. A better fit. But I think Trello can do the job in any case - it can fit with any scenario.

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Justin Dorfman
Justin Dorfman
Developer Evangelist at StackShare · | 3 upvotes · 27.5K views
Trello
Trello
macOS
macOS
Google Chrome
Google Chrome
Asana
Asana
Jira
Jira

I use Trello, the macOS app for my personal projects and Google Chrome for work. At work, I have 7-8 active boards for various projects.

At first, I wasn't sure about Trello. The last company I worked at used Asana and I was really used to that. Before then I was using Jira. Now I ❤️Trello. It is amazing. Power-Ups™️ are so awesome!

For personal projects, I have used it for planning a move across town. I'm also using it for my Wedding. I got my fiancè almost loving it too.

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related ESLint posts

Johnny Bell
Johnny Bell
Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 17 upvotes · 142.5K views
Webpack
Webpack
Node.js
Node.js
Yarn
Yarn
npm
npm
Babel
Babel
Prettier
Prettier
ESLint
ESLint
#ES6
#ES5

So when starting a new project you generally have your go to tools to get your site up and running locally, and some scripts to build out a production version of your site. Create React App is great for that, however for my projects I feel as though there is to much bloat in Create React App and if I use it, then I'm tied to React, which I love but if I want to switch it up to Vue or something I want that flexibility.

So to start everything up and running I clone my personal Webpack boilerplate - This is still in Webpack 3, and does need some updating but gets the job done for now. So given the name of the repo you may have guessed that yes I am using Webpack as my bundler I use Webpack because it is so powerful, and even though it has a steep learning curve once you get it, its amazing.

The next thing I do is make sure my machine has Node.js configured and the right version installed then run Yarn. I decided to use Yarn because when I was building out this project npm had some shortcomings such as no .lock file. I could probably move from Yarn to npm but I don't really see any point really.

I use Babel to transpile all of my #ES6 to #ES5 so the browser can read it, I love Babel and to be honest haven't looked up any other transpilers because Babel is amazing.

Finally when developing I have Prettier setup to make sure all my code is clean and uniform across all my JS files, and ESLint to make sure I catch any errors or code that could be optimized.

I'm really happy with this stack for my local env setup, and I'll probably stick with it for a while.

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Francisco Quintero
Francisco Quintero
Tech Lead at Dev As Pros · | 7 upvotes · 75.4K views
atDev As ProsDev As Pros
Node.js
Node.js
Rails
Rails
Amazon EC2
Amazon EC2
Heroku
Heroku
RuboCop
RuboCop
JavaScript
JavaScript
ESLint
ESLint
Slack
Slack
Twist
Twist

For many(if not all) small and medium size business time and cost matter a lot.

That's why languages, frameworks, tools, and services that are easy to use and provide 0 to productive in less time, it's best.

Maybe Node.js frameworks might provide better features compared to Rails but in terms of MVPs, for us Rails is the leading alternative.

Amazon EC2 might be cheaper and more customizable than Heroku but in the initial terms of a project, you need to complete configurationos and deploy early.

Advanced configurations can be done down the road, when the project is running and making money, not before.

But moving fast isn't the only thing we care about. We also take the job to leave a good codebase from the beginning and because of that we try to follow, as much as we can, style guides in Ruby with RuboCop and in JavaScript with ESLint and StandardJS.

Finally, comunication and keeping a good history of conversations, decisions, and discussions is important so we use a mix of Slack and Twist

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SonarQube

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Continuous Code Quality
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related SonarQube posts

Ganesa Vijayakumar
Ganesa Vijayakumar
Full Stack Coder | Module Lead · | 15 upvotes · 489.9K views
Codacy
Codacy
SonarQube
SonarQube
React
React
React Router
React Router
React Native
React Native
JavaScript
JavaScript
jQuery
jQuery
jQuery UI
jQuery UI
jQuery Mobile
jQuery Mobile
Bootstrap
Bootstrap
Java
Java
Node.js
Node.js
MySQL
MySQL
Hibernate
Hibernate
Heroku
Heroku
Amazon S3
Amazon S3
Amazon RDS
Amazon RDS
Solr
Solr
Elasticsearch
Elasticsearch
Amazon Route 53
Amazon Route 53
Microsoft Azure
Microsoft Azure
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Amazon EC2 Container Service
Apache Maven
Apache Maven
Git
Git
Docker
Docker

I'm planning to create a web application and also a mobile application to provide a very good shopping experience to the end customers. Shortly, my application will be aggregate the product details from difference sources and giving a clear picture to the user that when and where to buy that product with best in Quality and cost.

I have planned to develop this in many milestones for adding N number of features and I have picked my first part to complete the core part (aggregate the product details from different sources).

As per my work experience and knowledge, I have chosen the followings stacks to this mission.

UI: I would like to develop this application using React, React Router and React Native since I'm a little bit familiar on this and also most importantly these will help on developing both web and mobile apps. In addition, I'm gonna use the stacks JavaScript, jQuery, jQuery UI, jQuery Mobile, Bootstrap wherever required.

Service: I have planned to use Java as the main business layer language as I have 7+ years of experience on this I believe I can do better work using Java than other languages. In addition, I'm thinking to use the stacks Node.js.

Database and ORM: I'm gonna pick MySQL as DB and Hibernate as ORM since I have a piece of good knowledge and also work experience on this combination.

Search Engine: I need to deal with a large amount of product data and it's in-detailed info to provide enough details to end user at the same time I need to focus on the performance area too. so I have decided to use Solr as a search engine for product search and suggestions. In addition, I'm thinking to replace Solr by Elasticsearch once explored/reviewed enough about Elasticsearch.

Host: As of now, my plan to complete the application with decent features first and deploy it in a free hosting environment like Docker and Heroku and then once it is stable then I have planned to use the AWS products Amazon S3, EC2, Amazon RDS and Amazon Route 53. I'm not sure about Microsoft Azure that what is the specialty in it than Heroku and Amazon EC2 Container Service. Anyhow, I will do explore these once again and pick the best suite one for my requirement once I reached this level.

Build and Repositories: I have decided to choose Apache Maven and Git as these are my favorites and also so popular on respectively build and repositories.

Additional Utilities :) - I would like to choose Codacy for code review as their Startup plan will be very helpful to this application. I'm already experienced with Google CheckStyle and SonarQube even I'm looking something on Codacy.

Happy Coding! Suggestions are welcome! :)

Thanks, Ganesa

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SonarQube
SonarQube
codebeat
codebeat
Codacy
Codacy

It is very important to have clean code. To be sure that the code quality is not really bad I use a few tools. I love SonarQube with many relevant hints and deep analysis of code. codebeat isn't so detailed, but it can find complexity issues and duplications. Codacy cannot find more bugs then your IDE. The winner for me is SonarQube that shows me really relevant bugs in my code.

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related Code Climate posts

Jerome Dalbert
Jerome Dalbert
Senior Backend Engineer at StackShare · | 5 upvotes · 69.7K views
atStackShareStackShare
GitHub
GitHub
CircleCI
CircleCI
Code Climate
Code Climate
Brakeman
Brakeman
RuboCop
RuboCop
RSpec
RSpec
Rails
Rails
Git
Git
#ContinuousIntegration

The continuous integration process for our Rails backend app starts by opening a GitHub pull request. This triggers a CircleCI build and some Code Climate checks.

The CircleCI build is a workflow that runs the following jobs:

  • check for security vulnerabilities with Brakeman
  • check code quality with RuboCop
  • run RSpec tests in parallel with the knapsack gem, and output test coverage reports with the simplecov gem
  • upload test coverage to Code Climate

Code Climate checks the following:

  • code quality metrics like code complexity
  • test coverage minimum thresholds

The CircleCI jobs and Code Climate checks above have corresponding GitHub status checks.

Once all the mandatory GitHub checks pass and the code+functionality have been reviewed, developers can merge their pull request into our Git master branch. Code is then ready to deploy!

#ContinuousIntegration

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    Johnny Bell
    Johnny Bell
    Senior Software Engineer at StackShare · | 17 upvotes · 142.